JOURNEY – My New Online Earning Adventure | NewProxyLists

Hello all.

I have been spending some time setting up an website where i will be posting payment proofs of sites i have been earning money and crypto from. I am currently earning around 20$ per week atm from all sites but it is slowly increasing every day. If you want you can follow my journey forward as I will be posting updates on my earnings in this thread and also on the website. (the link is at the end of this thread)

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My earnings last week:
22.03.2020 – 29.03.2020

  1. 16803 satoshi (btc) – around 1,02$ (been low this week since i have been working on my website)
  2. 18,47 $ (HYIP sites)

Total: 19,49 (only counting from websites that has paid me to a wallet i have control over)

The payment proofs and which sites im currently using can be seen at my website at https://sharecrypto.site/

dungeons and dragons – Upgrading from D&D Adventure System to a full D&D Campaign

As someone who started with the D&DAS games and moved to D&D, here are some thoughts.

The D&DAS board games are not RPGs. They are board games inspired by D&D 4e, with the latest installment, Temple of Elemental Evil, also having a few basic elements from 5e. As you have noticed, if you expect an RPG experience from them, you’ll be disappointed.

They are, however, a great gateway to D&D. They share the basic mechanic of rolling a d20, adding a modifier, and comparing the result to a target number. Additionally, they are a fantastic source of minis to use in any edition of D&D. Specifically, Temple of Elemental Evil contains hero minis matching the classes and races of the pregenerated characters that are found in the 5e starter set.

Which brings us to the 5e starter set. This box includes a rule book containing the most minimal set of rules possible for 5e. It does not contain any rules for using a grid and minis. However, the accompanying adventure works perfectly well with a grid and minis. Basic rules for grids are found in the 5e Players Handbook or SRD, with more complete rules in the Dungeon Master’s Guide.

In order to utilize minis in the starter set, you will need to either draw or print (or build, if you’re really ambitious) each location where fights take place to scale (1″:5′). Most locations described in the book are accompanied by gridded maps which can either be drawn by hand to scale, or either scanned or purchased online for printing to scale. Those locations that don’t have maps in the book are easily drawn (a road with bushes to either side, a simple cave, etc).

Having transitioned from D&DAS games to the 5e starter set, I highly recommend giving it a try, adding in the rules for grid and minis from the PH and DMG. I also recommend following the starter set with Princes of the Apocalypse, a great adventure for 5e, which will utilize just about every mini you got in Temple of Elemental Evil, as they were released together.

However, coming from a war gaming background, 5e may not be your best choice. D&D 4e required much more tactical play than 5e, which is more optionally tactics-heavy. 5e’s more tactical play options (flanking, facing, more exact grid usage) are found in the DMG. D&D of any edition is, in the end, a pen and paper game. If your groups are not interested in this, but actually want a single unit war game, D&D is not right for you.

In summary, my advice to you is to take the 5e starter set, throw away the rule book it comes with, get the PH or SRD and the DMG, and give it a try, printing/drawing out the adventure’s maps to scale.

c – A small GOTO text adventure game

I was discussing with someone about using GOTO at stackoverflow. May someone teach me some hidden tricks in using GOTO? Do you have some suggestions for improvement? You may enjoy my little adventure game, give it a try. ^^

PS play the game before you read the source, otherwise you get spoiled

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

enum _directions{
    DIR_0 =    0b0000,
    DIR_E =    0b0001,
    DIR_W =    0b0010,
    DIR_WE =   0b0011,
    DIR_S =    0b0100,
    DIR_SE =   0b0101,
    DIR_SW =   0b0110,
    DIR_SWE =  0b0111,
    DIR_N =    0b1000,
    DIR_NE =   0b1001,
    DIR_NW =   0b1010,
    DIR_NWE =  0b1011,
    DIR_NS =   0b1100,
    DIR_NSE =  0b1101,
    DIR_NSW =  0b1110,
    DIR_NSWE = 0b1111
} DIRECTIONS;

void giveline(){
    printf("--------------------------------------------------------------------------------n");
}

void where(int room, unsigned char dir){
    printf("nYou are in room %i. Where do you want to go?n", room);
    if(dir & 8) printf("NORTH: Wn");
    else printf(".n");
    if(dir & 4) printf("SOUTH: Sn");
    else printf(".n");
    if(dir & 2) printf("WEST:  An");
    else printf(".n");
    if(dir & 1) printf("EAST:  Dn");
    else printf(".n");
}

char getdir(){
    char c = getchar();
    switch(c){
        case 'w' :
        case 'W' :
            return 'N';
        case 's' :
        case 'S' :
            return 'S';
        case 'a' :
        case 'A' :
            return 'W';
        case 'd' :
        case 'D' :
            return 'E';
        case 'e' :
            return 0;
    }
    return -1;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv()){
    START:
    printf("THE EVIL GOTO DUNGEONn");
    printf("---------------------n");
    printf("nPress a direction key "W, A, S, D" followed with 'ENTER' for moving.nn");
    char dir = -1;
        
    ROOM1:
    giveline();
    printf("Somehow you've managed to wake up at this place. You see a sign on the wall.n");
    printf(""Do you know what's more evil than an EVIL GOTO DUNGEON?"n");
    printf("You're wondering what this cryptic message means.n");
    where(1, DIR_SE);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'S') goto ROOM4;
        if(dir == 'E') goto ROOM2;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM2:
    giveline();
    printf("Besides another sign, this room is empty.n");
    printf(""Let's play a game!"n");
    where(2, DIR_W);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'W') goto ROOM1;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM3:
    giveline();
    printf("Man, dead ends are boring.n");
    printf("Why can't I escape this nightmare?n");
    where(3, DIR_S);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'S') goto ROOM6;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM4:
    giveline();
    printf("Is this a real place, or just fantasy?n");
    printf(""All good things come in three GOTOs."n");
    where(4, DIR_NSE);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'N') goto ROOM1;
        if(dir == 'S') goto ROOM7;
        if(dir == 'E') goto ROOM5;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM5:
    giveline();
    printf("This is a big river crossing. I guess I need to jump.n");
    where(5, DIR_SWE);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'S') goto ROOM8;
        if(dir == 'W') goto ROOM4;
        if(dir == 'E') goto ROOM6;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM6:
    giveline();
    printf("This place doesn't look very promising.n");
    where(6, DIR_NSW);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'N') goto ROOM3;
        if(dir == 'S') goto ROOM9;
        if(dir == 'W') goto ROOM5;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM7:
    giveline();
    printf(""Give a man a LOOP and you feed him FOR a WHILE;n");
    printf(" teach a man a GOTO and you feed him for a RUNTIME."n");
    where(7, DIR_NE);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'N') goto ROOM4;
        if(dir == 'E') goto ROOM8;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM8:
    giveline();
    printf("This looks like an endless loop of rooms.n");
    where(8, DIR_NW);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'N') goto ROOM5;
        if(dir == 'W') goto ROOM7;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    ROOM9:
    giveline();
    printf("You've found your old friend Domino. He doesn't looks scared, like you do.n");
    printf("n"Listen my friend,n");
    printf(" If you want to escape this place, you need to find the ESCAPE KEY."n");
    printf("nWhat does this mean?n");
    where(9, DIR_N);
    do{
        dir = getdir();
        if(dir == 'N') goto ROOM6;
    }while(dir);
    goto END;
    
    printf("You never saw me.n");
    
    END:
    giveline();
    printf("The Endn");
    return 0;
}

gm preparation – Adventure ideas for teachers at a “magic school”

I have been GMing a campaign of “Scion” for some years and my players have established a “School/University” for young scions (Legend 1-3), where they can “learn” to be heroes fighting titans. Up until now my plots were mostly “investigate this strange occurrence”, “slay this titanspawn”, “protect this new pupil”, “find that rare substance” commonly initiated by other scions and adversaries.

Now the players would like to involve themselves more with the pupils, help them grow, etc, so the plots should be more focused on the institutional side of things. They still want to play their powerful characters (Legend 5-6). They don’t want to play any of the pupils, they just want to interact more with them and have the stories revolve more around the school. Do you have some plot ideas for that?

dungeons and dragons – What is the earliest example of a variant monster in a published D&D adventure?

In an answer to another question I made the point that using non-standard variants of published monsters has been common practice since the early days of D&D. This was based on my own experience, but I am certain I have seen the practice in published aventures. What is the earliest instance of a variant monster in a published D&D adventure?

How I am defining the term “variant monster”:

  • A variant monster must be based on a published, official monster but differs from the official monster in a significant way. By significant way, I mean any change in physical statisics (including hit points outside the range normally possible) or a change in the monster’s physical description that might cause players to misidentify it or not notice it (example: red slime with green slime stats).
  • Includes any monster with abilities not accounted for in its official description, such as a spell-casting medusa, a psionic basilisk, a day-walking vampire, or a water-breathing owl-bear.
  • Includes any monster that behaves in a way that would normally be impossible for that monster (example: a sentient iron golem that acts on its own free will). But this does not include a creature that has been turned into a monster and still behaves as its natural self (example: a gnome trapped inside an iron golem’s body).
  • Does not include new monsters that are not based on existing oficial monsters.
  • Does not include new types of old monsters that receive a full description in the module and possibly later were published as monsters in their own right in supplements. Example: the drow (mentioned briefly, not statted in the 1e Monster Manual) was fully described and statted in the appendix of the first adventure in which they appeared (G3 Hall of the Fire Giant King) and was later published in the 1e Fiend Folio, so drow is a unique monster in its own right, not a variant monster.
  • Does not include monsters that are physically and statistically the same as their official type but behave in an unusual way (e.g., a good-aligned red dragon or a cunning, educated ogre).
  • Does not include monsters equipped in an unusual way.
  • Does not include variants that are actually mentioned in the monster’s official description. Example: the 1E AD&D Monster Manual description of the ghoul mentioned the existence of lacedons, an aquatic ghoul that conforms in all other respects to a standard ghoul. The manual does not give a swim speed for the lacedon, which presumably it has, so giving a lacedon a swim speed in a published adventure would not count as a variant, unless other of its stats or characteristics have been changed.

NOTE: The question specifies D&D, which includes all editions and Pathfinder. Published adventures would be any official adventure modules, adventures published in Dragon or Dungeon magazines, or third party modules designed for use with a qualifying D&D or Pathfinder system.

What is the earliest example of a varint monster in a published adventure?

In an answer to another question I made the point that using non-standard variants of published monsters has been common practice since the early days of RPGs. This was based on my own experience, but I am certain I have seen the practice in published aventures. What is the earliest instance of a variant monster in a published adventure?

How I am defining the term “variant monster”:

  • A variant monster must be based on a published, official monster but differs from the official monster in a significant way. By significant way, I mean any change in physical statisics (including hit points outside the range normally possible) or a change in the monster’s physical description that might cause players to misidentify it or not notice it (example: red slime with green slime stats).
  • Includes any monster with abilities not accounted for in its official description, such as a spell-casting medusa or a psionic basilisk.
  • Includes any monster that behaves in a way that would normally be impossible for that monster (example: a sentient iron golem that acts on its own free will). But this does not include a creature that has been turned into a monster and still behaves as its natural self (example: a gnome trapped inside an iron golem’s body).
  • Does not include new monsters that are not based on existing oficial monsters.
  • Does not include new types of old monsters that receive a full description in the module and possibly later were published as monsters in supplements. Example: the drow (mentioned briefly, not statted in the 1e Monster Manual) was fully described and statted in the appendix of the first adventure in which they appeared (G3 Hall of the Fire Giant King) and was later published in the 1e Fiend Folio, so drow is not a variant monster.
  • Does not include monsters that are physically and statistically the same as their official type but behave in an unusual way (e.g., a good-aligned red dragon or a cunning, educated ogre).
  • Does not include monsters equipped in an unusual way.

dnd 5e – My players have a habit of always torturing enemies they capture for information, how can I make our adventure less macabre?

First, give them plenty of other opportunities to find stuff out. Can they sneak up on the goblins and listen to them talk? Can the one who speaks orc pretend to get captured and listen in, giving a signal to their friends for rescue when they’ve learned the plans? Do the guards carry their orders with them written down, even if it’s in code? Can they rescue someone who’s overheard their captors’ plans?

It would also work to use the The Dark Knight solution: give them information, but teach them that information obtained via torture is highly unreliable. Either the captive is vindictive and gives them false or misleading information to spite them, or they’re scared and intimidated and will say anything to make them stop the torture, whether they know the truth or not. Make it clear why the information is unreliable so they learn that what they’re doing is awful, not just ineffective.

Another option is to use NPC reactions: have a NPC witness their behaviour, or ask them how they learned secret enemy information, and have them react appropriately when they learn how the party got it. Alternatively have NPCs they rescue have heard about the party’s behaviour, perhaps even from their captors, and be frightened to travel with them. This might mean they’re wary around them, or if they see first hand their tactics, perhaps they run away or try and sneak off during the next rest.

Something else I’ve learned in these situations is to give the players a clear chance and path to redemption. If you haven’t had the out of character conversation or you want to find an excuse to have it, it helps to turn the story consequences into a good story opportunity, rather than just punishing behaviour you find gross (as do I) and they presumably (hopefully) haven’t thought too deeply about. So have the NPC they’re talking to put a hand on their shoulder and tell them this is not the way. Have the one who is with them when they go to cut something off a victim give the orc a clean death and tell them there are more honourable paths.

And, at the end of the day, have the out of character conversation where you explain that you know it’s not real and no-one’s really getting hurt, but in a game where they can literally choose to do anything, you’re not into imagining torture. It might help to walk this back to session zero chat and draw up some lines and veils, or introduce the X card – these techniques are not just for players, but for GMs too.

dungeons and dragons – Trying to identify this adventure

Many years ago (24+) I had a set of 4 warhammer fantasy roleplay adventures split between 2 books.

Each adventure was to try and claim an elemental gem of power, the gems where tremendously powerful and when combined and at the end of the adventure it was suggested the world ended.

At the time I remember being told the adventure had been converted from a famous published D and D campaign.

I am trying to remember both the name of the WFRP adventure and the DnD campaign it may have been based on. If this is better split into 2 questions I am happy to ask B once A is answered.

dnd 5e – Applying XP to a pre-created adventure with milestones?

The upsides of this are of course that you don’t have to mess with the pre-created module and can just play it as-is, but that’s not the reason I’m suggesting this. I’m suggesting this because of something you mentioned in comments:

… I want to encourage out of the box thinking and role playing vs just killing everything in sight to churn through the quests, XP is a good tool for this as it allows me to hand out bonus XP do good bits of roleplay as opposed to just, Quest 1 complete here is level 1, I don’t care how you got there.

I completely disagree with this reasoning. In my experience (no pun intended), I’ve found that games that make use of XP tend to encourage players to pick more fights and rely on combat, fighting everything to the last, because the more things you kill = more XP = faster level progression. It tends to discourage more roleplaying-based solutions and clever planning (besides how to kill the most enemies with minimal risk, but still expecting full XP for it).

However, I’ve found, both in using milestone levelling and being a player in games that use it, the use of milestones tends to encourage players to forget about how they’re going to get to the next level, allowing them to engage in the story more, roleplaying their way out of combat if it better fits the narrative, being more creative, focusing on the story precisely because they trust that you’ll hand out the next level up when the story calls for it, freeing them up to progress with the story in whichever way they please (i.e. not just fighting everything for XP).

The accepted answer to Does 5e address the murderhobos problem? proposes using milestone levelling as a way to reduce murderhobo style play (assuming you agree with OP/accepted answer).

But what about when I start using my homebrew stuff?

I’d recommend still using milestone levelling, even if your game isn’t going to necessarily “follow a strict story” in a railroading sense. However, your party will still be achieving something and when you feel like they’ve achieved enough since their last level to deserve the next one, that’s when they level up. This still allows you to run the game with player decisions front-and-centre, allowing the party to decide where to go and what to do next.

In a couple of games I’m currently running, I’m effectively using milestone levelling, but behind the scenes, I’m also lumping together how much XP the various combat encounters would provide so that I know that, when I decide the party have achieved enough in an in-game narrative sense, I can also double check that they’ve also earned a sizeable chunk of “XP” for the level to feel justified.

This prevents me from handing out levels to frequently, or holding out on the party too long. I don’t care if they earn exactly the XP they needed (otherwise, I might as well use XP levelling), and effectively whatever they don’t earn via XP they’ve “earned” via roleplaying and story progression, but it’s more of a sanity check so that I have more confidence in how often I hand out levels.

dnd 5e – How are PCs supposed to know this detail relevant to Area 4 of the Redbrand Hideout in the Lost Mine of Phandelver adventure?

Spoilers ahead:

The most information we can get from the book can be found in the General Features section of the hideout description, in the box titled “What the Redbrands know” (page 20):

The Redbrands have a handful of captives in a holding area “near the old crypts,” which are guarded by skeletons (see areas 4 and 5).

This only tells us that the Redbrands are aware of the skeletons (it’s their trap after all). However, it is likely that at least some of the Redbrands would know the command word as well, as the trap is positioned right in front of their prison, and the skeletons might otherwise interfere with prisoner transfer.

If this doesn’t seem likely to you, there is at least one person in the hideout that is expected to know such things: Glasstaff himself. Though it is not strictly specified in the book, it is very likely that he’s the one who set up the whole trap, and thus would know the codeword.

As for how could your PC-s find this out? Interrogation, persuasion, magical effects, and others. While getting information that you don’t ask for in an interrogation seems unlikely, a particularly successful one could yield it. For instance, if your PC rolled an Intimidation check while interrogating and got a very high score, an NPC might be so scared that he starts spewing out everything he knows (possibly pissing his pants at the same time). Or a well worded Suggestion (“Lead us safely through the hideout”) spell might prompt an NPC to divulge such secrets. It’s even possible to make allies out of enemies, and an ally would be incentivized to keep his new friends safe from skeletons.


As a side note: the adventure book you’re using is not a rulebook. It is merely a suggestion on how to play the adventure the way the author imagined it. DM’s are allowed (and required, imho) to adapt the adventure according to how the campaign is going.

Sticking to the book is handy for new DM’s that are still struggling with all their other responsibilities and don’t want to add adaptive storytelling to the list. But the book was not meant to be a cook book, so there are naturally some holes in the text that the DM is required to fill in. This is also good practice, as modifying the initial script in reaction to PC’s actions usually leads to a much more enjoyable campaign than just going by the book.

In short:

The PC’s might not enter the skeleton room at all, at which point the keyword is irrelevant. It is also irrelevant in case the players stumble upon the room before gathering any information. But it’s good for a DM to know it exists so he can throw it in at any point in the game where it would make the game more enjoyable (as a reward for a high roll, or even as a new plot point that enriches the original adventure).