graphics card – My computer’s display goes black after a while of use, but it isn’t the display. Is the issue my motherboard, or my GPU?

For reference, I am running Linux on my PC, but I know the issue isn’t a software one, since I run Linux on all my machines and have on this one for a while, and this issue is relatively recent, so it can’t be Linux itself.

I suspect the problem may be with the motherboard, but I am unsure. I suspect this because one of the two PCIe slots on the motherboard is bent, probably during transit (traveled with my PC recently). I tried using the other slot for the GPU, thinking that that might fix it, but the problem still occurred within the next 24 hours. If it is the motherboard, I assume the problem would have to be with the PCIe bus itself, but again, I don’t know enough to be sure.

I’m hoping the issue is with the motherboard, since that would be easier to replace money-wise.

The GPU is new (purchased March 2020), and is an AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and worked perfectly until I traveled with the machine, further leading me to the above conclusion about the motherboard.

This is a really important issue for me, since the computer is question is needed for both gaming and schoolwork for the upcoming semester.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Universal browser based Dark Mode (Dark Reader) vs. Individual separate black themes on each site

I’m pondering an idea about browser based, concentrated dark mode/dark theme service’s that operate pretty much like current superb add-on Dark Reader.

What makes me wonder why does the community that usually optimizes for not repeating work among developers, does take the burden of developing a dark theme for pretty much every popular web application.

Wouldn’t it be wiser to develop a set of standards when it comes to colour management, maybe even a .darktheme config file to override some of the basic settings, alongside a single browser based dark mode program for every browser that operates on the principle of current dark reader? I mean the reader is so good that I pretty much prefer it to custom made dark modes on most of the sites anyway.

What’s your insight on this matter?

My personal opinion is that it’s the inevitable future, but I haven’t found any signs that the process has started yet.

EDIT- before someone suggests sticking to the Dark Reader extension, It’s all good but compare a little a bit clunky extension developed by few enthusiasts to fully fledged browser options backed by hundreds of full-time developers.

Thanks!

reflection – Black fabric, or material, that is truely non-reflective

The usual photography suspects – materials such as Duvetyne – are meant for reflection control on-set or as backgrounds. The fabric is dark enough that you can use them in conjunction with the inverse square law to pretty much ensure that local lights (and reflections from objects on set) will be well below “exposure black” by the time (or, rather, by the distance) they make it back to your shooting subject. A very high-quality black velvet is even deader, provided that the surface fibres are properly aligned for your purposes (the sides of the fuzzy bits are merely black fabric; it’s the canyons between the fibres that does most of the actual hard work). That’s good and all, but it’s not going to get you to the dead black you want to prevent, say, dashboard reflections in windshield glass. (Well, it could work, but you’d need to brush the velvet to suit the shot, so it’s no good for video on the go or for quick shooting.) For that, you need specialty stuff.

There are two problems with specialty stuff. One is that it’s fragile, so if it’s anything that is exposed and needs to last, it’s going to need relatively frequent replacement. Every material that does what you want relies on structure as much as colour to do what it do, and that structure won’t stand up to much cleaning. The other problem is that it tends to be on the expensive side. Not “mortgage your house” expensive, just a whole lot more than most fabrics, at around $10 to $25 US per square foot (130 to 300-ish € per square metre), depending on the material. And there is stuff that is significantly more expensive – and effective – still, but it becomes entirely impractical for anything except the innards of cameras and optical instruments – all of the increased light absorbency will be killed by ordinary dust and moisture in minutes. A couple of possible solutions are Fineshut SP and VL Flocksheet, both by KoPro and available at Amazon. (The company makes black, and that’s about it. They’re the makers of Mosou Black paint as well.) Fineshut sheets are meant to line optical instruments of various sorts, with the SP version being the high-cost-but-maybe-practical end of what you’re looking for, depending on budget. Fineshut KIWAMI is the stupid-expensive stuff you really don’t want to waste money on. It’s the best stuff out there for other uses, but not for your use case. Flocksheet is more of a TelePrompTer-liner sort of thing, which is more or less what you’re looking for. Again, they’re all fragile to one degree or another, but that’s what makes them work.

Another product mentioned here is Cinefoil. Great stuff, but not at all what you’re looking for. Cinefoil’s party trick is that it’s heat-resistant while being pretty darned black. That means it can be used near hot lights. And being foil, it can easily be shaped. Needless to say, that makes it the ideal thing for impromptu light-shaping tools. It’s also great for killing reflections from light stands and so forth, mostly because there’s going to be a roll or two or three of the stuff in your gear bag or on your tape-and-gel rack in the studio. When it’s the right stuff, it can’t be beat, but it’s not the right stuff for the case you’ve laid out. It’s matte black, but it’s not nearly black enough or matte enough. You want something that looks like somebody pulled a Looney Toons portable hole out of their pocket and threw it on the surface you want to get rid of. Cinefoil isn’t that. Optical blacks are.

Well, they mostly are, at least. Light them bright enough and crank the exposure up high enough, and you’ll be able to shoot them. If you’re parked in full sun at high noon and trying to get shots of something at the back of a dimly-lit parking garage, physics doesn’t really care about your feelings… or your job. Slightly less than one percent of an awful lot is going to drown out 80 percent of next to nothing. You’d need to make sure that the light doesn’t make it to your side of the glass in that case (with shades), to the extent that you can. Black materials can only do so much.

I will colorize 03 black and white photos within 24 hours for $4

I will colorize 03 black and white photos within 24 hours

Are you looking for colorize a black and white photo done?

Yes you are at the right place.

We are offering following services

I will add color to your black and white photos

High Resolution

Commercial Use

Why you will offer me?

Fast and accurate service

Easy to communication

100% satisfaction

Please contact me in inbox before placing the order

if you have any question, you can ask me without any hesitation

if you want my service,

Just place your Order…

Thank you

.

LCD screen of Canon showing black in auto mode

Whether an image is automatically displayed or not following capture can be turned on or off using the menu on all digital Canon EOS cameras. If you have selected a setting that displays the image, you can also select from several options that determine for how long the review image is displayed. You may have turned it off without realizing what you were doing. The reason you see it when in the C1 mode is that the C1 mode was set up before you accidently changed the setting. When you turn the dial to C1 it uses the settings active at the time you recorded the then-current settings to C1.¹

You can turn image review on or off using the Shooting1 (red) menu tab of your camera’s menu. From page 180 of the EOS Rebel T5/1200D Instruction Manual:

enter image description here

To control when the settings appear on the screen, use the Setup2 (yellow) menu tab of your camera’s menu. From page 193 of the Manual:

enter image description here

For Live View, please be sure you have Live View enabled under the last tab of the Shooting (red) menu:

enter image description here

¹ This, of course, requires a Canon camera that offers user configurable “Custom” modes on the mode dial. The EOS Rebel T5/1200D does not include this feature.

reflection – black fabric or material that is really non-reflective

The usual photography suspects – materials such as Duvetyne – are meant for reflection control on-set or as backgrounds. The fabric is dark enough that you can use them in conjunction with the inverse square law to pretty much ensure that local lights (and reflections from objects on set) will be well below “exposure black” by the time (or, rather, by the distance) they make it back to your shooting subject. A very high-quality black velvet is even deader, provided that the surface fibres are properly aligned for your purposes (the sides of the fuzzy bits are merely black fabric; it’s the canyons between the fibres that does most of the actual hard work). That’s good and all, but it’s not going to get you to the dead black you want to prevent, say, dashboard reflections in windshield glass. (Well, it could work, but you’d need to brush the velvet to suit the shot, so it’s no good for video on the go or for quick shooting.) For that, you need specialty stuff.

There are two problems with specialty stuff. One is that it’s fragile, so if it’s anything that is exposed and needs to last, it’s going to need relatively frequent replacement. Every material that does what you want relies on structure as much as colour to do what it do, and that structure won’t stand up to much cleaning. The other problem is that it tends to be on the expensive side. Not “mortgage your house” expensive, just a whole lot more than most fabrics, at around $10 to $25 US per square foot (130 to 300-ish € per square metre), depending on the material. And there is stuff that is significantly more expensive – and effective – still, but it becomes entirely impractical for anything except the innards of cameras and optical instruments – all of the increased light absorbency will be killed by ordinary dust and moisture in minutes. A couple of possible solutions are Fineshut SP and VL Flocksheet, both by KoPro and available at Amazon. (The company makes black, and that’s about it. They’re the makers of Mosou Black paint as well.) Fineshut sheets are meant to line optical instruments of various sorts, with the SP version being the high-cost-but-maybe-practical end of what you’re looking for, depending on budget. Fineshut KIWAMI is the stupid-expensive stuff you really don’t want to waste money on. It’s the best stuff out there for other uses, but not for your use case. Flocksheet is more of a TelePrompTer-liner sort of thing, which is more or less what you’re looking for. Again, they’re all fragile to one degree or another, but that’s what makes them work.

Another product mentioned here is Cinefoil. Great stuff, but not at all what you’re looking for. Cinefoil’s party trick is that it’s heat-resistant while being pretty darned black. That means it can be used near hot lights. And being foil, it can easily be shaped. Needless to say, that makes it the ideal thing for impromptu light-shaping tools. It’s also great for killing reflections from light stands and so forth, mostly because there’s going to be a roll or two or three of the stuff in your gear bag or on your tape-and-gel rack in the studio. When it’s the right stuff, it can’t be beat, but it’s not the right stuff for the case you’ve laid out. It’s matte black, but it’s not nearly black enough or matte enough. You want something that looks like somebody pulled a Looney Toons portable hole out of their pocket and threw it on the surface you want to get rid of. Cinefoil isn’t that. Optical blacks are.

Well, they mostly are, at least. Light them bright enough and crank the exposure up high enough, and you’ll be able to shoot them. If you’re parked in full sun at high noon and trying to get shots of something at the back of a dimly-lit parking garage, physics doesn’t really care about your feelings… or your job. Slightly less than one percent of an awful lot is going to drown out 80 percent of next to nothing. You’d need to make sure that the light doesn’t make it to your side of the glass in that case (with shades), to the extent that you can. Black materials can only do so much.

opengl – Get black bars with framebuffer and glViewport

I have read several tutorials and answers regarding framebuffers and glViewport, but I can’t seem to resolve this issue I have. I want to take a low resolution framebuffer (400×225) and place it in a 1280×720 window at the position 100×100 (from bottom-left);

  1. Load a 400×225 png image in a framebuffer with the same size
glGenFramebuffers(1, &m_framebuffer);
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, m_framebuffer);

glGenTextures(1, &m_textureColorbuffer);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, m_textureColorbuffer);
glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGB, 400, 225, 0, GL_RGB, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, NULL);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);
glFramebufferTexture2D(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0, GL_TEXTURE_2D, m_textureColorbuffer, 0);

glGenRenderbuffers(1, &m_renderBuffer);
glBindRenderbuffer(GL_RENDERBUFFER, m_renderBuffer);
glRenderbufferStorage(GL_RENDERBUFFER, GL_DEPTH24_STENCIL8, screenW, screenH); stencil buffer.
glFramebufferRenderbuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_DEPTH_STENCIL_ATTACHMENT, GL_RENDERBUFFER, m_renderBuffer); 
if (glCheckFramebufferStatus(GL_FRAMEBUFFER) != GL_FRAMEBUFFER_COMPLETE)
    printf("ERROR::FRAMEBUFFER:: Framebuffer is not complete!");
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, 0);
  1. Generate the quad for the framebuffer:
    float quadVertices() = { // vertex attributes for a quad that fills the entire screen in Normalized Device Coordinates.
    // positions   // texCoords
    -1.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f, 1.0f,
    -1.0f, -1.0f,  0.0f, 0.0f,
     1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f,

    -1.0f,  1.0f,  0.0f, 1.0f,
     1.0f, -1.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f,
     1.0f,  1.0f,  1.0f, 1.0f
    };

    unsigned int quadVBO;
    glGenVertexArrays(1, &m_quadVAO);
    glGenBuffers(1, &quadVBO);
    glBindVertexArray(m_quadVAO);
    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, quadVBO);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(quadVertices), &quadVertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);
    glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
    glVertexAttribPointer(0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 4 * sizeof(float), (void*)0);
    glEnableVertexAttribArray(1);
    glVertexAttribPointer(1, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 4 * sizeof(float), (void*)(2 * sizeof(float)));
  1. Create an orthographic projection matrix with the framebuffer size:
glm::mat4 bgProjection = glm::ortho(0.0f, static_cast<float>(400), static_cast<float>(225), 0.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f);
  1. Set the glViewport:
glViewport(0, 0, 400, 225);
  1. Bind the framebuffer
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, m_framebuffer);
  1. Draw the sprite:
    shader->use();
    glm::mat4 model = glm::mat4(1.0f);
    model = glm::translate(model, glm::vec3(position, 0.0f));  // first translate (transformations are: scale happens first, then rotation, and then final translation happens; reversed order)

    model = glm::translate(model, glm::vec3(0.5f * size.x, 0.5f * size.y, 0.0f)); // move origin of rotation to center of quad
    model = glm::rotate(model, glm::radians(rotate), glm::vec3(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f)); // then rotate
    model = glm::translate(model, glm::vec3(-0.5f * size.x, -0.5f * size.y, 0.0f)); // move origin back

    model = glm::scale(model, glm::vec3(size, 1.0f)); // last scale

    shader->setMat4("model", model);
    shader->setMat4("projection", projection);

    shader->setVec3("Colour", color);

    glBindVertexArray(this->quadVAO);
    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, 6, GL_UNSIGNED_INT, 0);
    glBindVertexArray(0);
  1. Unbind the framebuffer:
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, 0);
  1. Finally render the framebuffer:
    shader.use();
    glBindVertexArray(m_quadVAO);
    glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, m_textureColorbuffer); // use the color attachment texture as the texture of the quad plane
    glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 6);

This is the output I get when glViewport(0, 0, 400, 225);
enter image description here

But when I set the glViewport(100, 100, 400, 225); I get these black borders:
enter image description here

As you can see, the glViewport has moved to 100×100, but it has also created a 100×100 gap in the viewport. I have tried adjusting the projection matrix and framebuffer, but it seems like I am doing something incorrect with glViewport. Thank you.

c# – How to Make Organic Fade to Black in Unity

I’m working a retro/old-style video game, and I was wondering whether or not there is a way to create an organic fade-to-black, similar to what is found in the original NES console. I am aware of how to create a traditional fade-to-black screen, but it doesn’t really fit the theme of my game. I’m using Unity 2019.4 LTS.

Here’s a example of a character about to exit the area and cause a fade to black:

Here’s what the organic fade looks like at 75% completion:

And here’s what a traditional fade looks like at 75% completion:

image processing – How to create a smooth black and white texture without jaggies?

The following code creates a random black and white texture with ugly jaggies (pixelized “stairs”) all around the shapes, because of the Binarize command. I could add a final Blur or GaussianFilter to remove them, but the result is too blurry. How can I modify that code to get nice smooth shapes, without bluring it?

randomTiles = Table({RandomReal(), RandomReal(), RandomInteger({0, 1})}, {n, 1, 1000});

Binarize(Blur(ListDensityPlot(
   randomTiles,
   InterpolationOrder -> 0,
   Frame -> False,
   PlotRangePadding -> 0,
   ImageSize -> {400, 400}
   ), 10))

Preview of what this code is doing:

enter image description here

Why some of my whatsapp recieved images are turn black

I recieved them from i phone . My one is android . But some are ok.. only few are turned in to black