dnd 5th – Can the Dragon's Breath spell cause damage to enemies without a clear path to the caster?

Full coverage and protection of effect areas on the point of origin, not on the launcher

The breath of the dragon goes through two 'steps'; the spell is first cast on a creature targeted by a touchscreen. Standard touch targeting rules are applied. Then, the affected creature (as long as the spell lasts) can use its action to produce an area of ​​effect that deals damage.

The relevant extract from the Player's manual with regard to the effect areas:

The effect of a spell grows in straight lines from the point of origin. If no unblocked straight line extends from the point of origin to a location in the effect area, that location is not included in the area of ​​the spell. To obstruct one of these imaginary lines, an obstruction must provide total coverage […]

Player's manualp. 204

Who like The breath of the dragon There is no exception to this (some other spells say "this effect extends around the corners" or whatever), the area of ​​the spell's effect is blocked by corners.

However, the area of ​​effect of The breath of the dragon is a cone from the affected creature (the one who needs to use his action). The position of the wheel does not enter the picture.

Similarly, a spell with an area of ​​a sphere can affect a creature that has full coverage of the caster, provided that the origin point (in this case the center of the sphere) has a clear line with this creature.

5th dnd – Increasing the damage done by the breath of a dragonborn would help to balance them?

Dragonborn is one of the weaker races in the game, as confirmed by the answers to my other recent question: How could the addition of a dark-eyed racial trait to Dragonborn's balance affect it?

It seems to me that part of their weakness, at least, is that their breathing weapon is underpowered, so in another attempt by mine to bring them into line with the other playable races, I'm considering how to increase the Damage can help balance them, and how much to increase it.

As before, my goal is to make them more attractive to players, but not make them too strong to master them. Ideally, they should not be better than a mountain dwarf (one of the strongest but always balanced playable races) at most.

So, in this spirit, here is the damage caused by their breathing weapon, RAW:

A creature takes 2d6 points of damage in case of failure in a save and half the damage if successful. The damage increases to 3d6 at the 6th level, 4d6 at the 11th level and 5d6 at the 16th.

I have considered the following:

  • Damage increase of 1d6 in total: this would give 3d6, which will increase to 4d6, 5d6 and 6d6 as their level increases. My concern is that 3d6 would be very powerful for a level 1 character, but 4d6 is not very impressive for a level 9 or 10 character …
  • Damage increase from 1d6 to level 3 only: this means that the damage remains at 2d6 at level 1, but is increased to a more respectable level 3 at level 3, and the progression after is very similar to the option above, but still at higher levels. I wonder if it's still a little skinny …
  • Increases damage by 1d6 more often: by adding increases to levels 3, 8-9 and 13-14 (you have not decided yet exactly), so that a level 1 character always has 2d6 but at level 3 it's 3d6, which is a bit more respectable for a level 3 character, and at level 6, it's 5d6, according to my previous option. However, it starts to increase more quickly and we end up at 8d6 at level 16, which is comparable to a fireball or lightning fate, but on the other hand, a level 5 demon demon can cast two or three fireballs by short rest, is it so bad for a level 16 dragonborn?

As you can see by my rationalizations about Fiend Warlocks, I'm tempted by the last option, but I'm afraid its speed makes this feature too powerful. Even races that have an innate spellcast (ie a tiefling, a newt, etc.) do not have an offensive third-level spell, so maybe the second option is the better one?

Since it is difficult to evaluate using the tools mentioned in the answers to my last question, I hope there is a better way to judge the power of such increases to make the original dragon breed more powerful than it is, but no more powerful than a mountain dwarf at maximum in terms of balance. Which of my options above would achieve the type of balance sought?

dnd 5th – Does the Elemental Adept feat apply to Dragon's Breath spell?

the Basic Adept function does not qualify the fact that a spell damage must be rolled at the same turn like when the spell is cast. So, because the damage caused by The breath of the dragon comes from a spell, he would be eligible for this feature.

The caveat is that this is absolutely true only if the thrower targets himself with the effect of the original spell. If they target someone else, the decision is different.

There are two scenarios to consider:

Launcher The breath of the dragon on creature B, creature B has the Basic Adept functionality

In this scenario, creature B does not benefit from Basic Adept: The exploit specifically requires that the damage comes from a spell that the creature has cast itself. Because the effect was conferred by someone else, he would not qualify in this scenario.

Launcher The breath of the dragon on creature B, launcher A has the Basic Adept functionality

It's ambiguous because when a creature buffered with The breath of the dragon rolls the dice for their action, we do not know if they Count as launch damage dice or if it's the original caster who does it.

  • If, as a DM, we decide that Creature B rolls damage dice, then these the damage rollers would not benefit from Basic Adept.
  • If, however, we decide that Launcher A rolls the dice, then these rolls of damage would have benefit from Basic Adept.

So, although I do not know the correct answer to this particular puzzle (maybe the subject of another question?), I think that if you or your Deputy Commissioner decide the correct answer, one of the two affirmations above is correct.

5th dnd – Does the Elemental Adept apply to Dragon's Breath spell?

The feat of the elemental follower states:

[When] You deal damage for a spell you cast that deals damage of this type, you can deal with any 1 of a die like a 2.

the The breath of the dragon the spell deals damage, but not as a direct result of the spell:

Until the spell ends, the creature can use an action to exhale the energy of the chosen type in a 15 foot cone. Each creature in this area must make a dexterity save roll, taking 3d6 damage of the chosen type in case of failure of the save or half less damage if successful.

Would these exhalations be eligible for the application of Elemental Adept? If so, who needs the exploit (the caster or the exhaler)?

5th dnd – Does the Elemental Adept apply to Dragon's Breath?

The feat of the elemental follower states:

[When] You deal damage for a spell you cast that deals damage of this type, you can deal with any 1 of a die like a 2.

the The breath of the dragon the spell deals damage, but not as a direct result of the spell:

Until the spell ends, the creature can use an action to exhale the energy of the chosen type in a 15 foot cone. Each creature in this area must make a dexterity save roll, taking 3d6 damage of the chosen type in case of failure of the save or half less damage if successful.

Would these exhalations be eligible for the application of Elemental Adept? If so, who needs the exploit (the caster or the exhaler)?

Pathfinder Kineticist, does the electric breath lead as normal electricity

I play a kineticist, currently level 3, and I use electric explosions as the main attack.

My DM has decided, and I do not exactly disagree, that when I attack an enemy with the help of an electric blast, any other player coming into contact with my target will also receive the damage. of the explosion.

This led me to kill a teammate who was attacked by a manticore. (He was unconscious and dying)

By extension, if 2 enemies were in a puddle or were submerged, and I attacked one, the other was also damaged.

I would like to know what the experts think about this decision.

dnd 5th – If I find myself spontaneously in an environment where I can not breathe, do I hold my breath?

Of course, if I want to dive into the underwater cave or explore a mine shaft with an unbreathable air, I can announce that my character holds his breath. I would be fine for 1 minute CON modifier. And hold my breath is not an action, I can just do it.

But what happens if the transition from a safe environment to a dangerous environment occurs suddenly? For example: a) I am drunk and I fall from a ship; b) I teleport myself in a plane without a breathing atmosphere; c) I turn into a beast that can breathe only under water; etc.

In this case, the character did not really hold his breath at that moment, because everything was happening so fast. Does this mean that it is running out of air immediately and that it drops to 0 health after a number of turns equal to its CON modifier? But at some point, you will have at least a little oxygen in your lungs (and your blood), even without holding your breath. Is it one of those questions where the answer is "There is no rule, ask your GM?" Because I am the GM and all these monologues are annoying ^^.

If I find myself spontaneously in an environment where I can not breathe, do I hold my breath automatically?

5th dnd – In a 2-on-1 fight, can a caster launch Dragon's Breath on his ally while he is charmed by the enemy?

Jeremy Crawford, 5th rule designer, said the following in a tweet about the The breath of the dragon to spell:

The dragon's breath has two sets of targets: the creature to whom you give the breath weapon and the creatures in the effect area created by the spell.

Imagine that there are 3 creatures in a fight: a wizard, his ally and an enemy. The enemy is able to impose the enchanted condition on the magician. Although charmed, can the magician The breath of the dragon on their ally?

Since there are only three creatures, the enchanted wizard should have realized that giving The breath of the dragon to their ally would allow them to use it against the charmer. It looks like, "Hey, I can not beat that guy, stay a bat, beat him for me!"

Since charmed forbids you to cast a harmful spell targeting the charmer, does this mean that it is a potential secondary target for the The breath of the dragon spell prevents the charmed magician from casting The breath of the dragon while charmed?

Is it ok to forbid the enchanted magician to throw The breath of the dragon in this situation?