iStorage DatAshur PRO 256-bit AES-XTS – 15-digit pin duration up to brute force

I'm looking into the USB drive encrypted above, however, my concern is that it's only a 15-digit numeric digit pin, and I'm not sure how to do the calculations in time until I get it. to brute force …

Is a 15-digit numeric character PIN strong enough to prevent brute force?

add hacking forums, hacking forums, carding forums and brute force forums

Hello, please add hacking forums, hacking forums, carding forums and brute force forums (forums where there are specialists of the selection passwords).

Firewalls – Brute Force Centralized Connection Detection Using Netflow Data

Is brute force connection detection possible with Netflow data?
With netflow data, you can check the number of incoming packets on a specific destination port (for the search flow). If the number is less than a service-specific threshold value (SSH, FTP, etc.), the source IP address may be considered an attacker.

Has anyone ever experienced it, or is there an alternative for establishing a centralized detection of brute force? It's about protecting a few hundred Linux hosts running different services (SSH, FTP, HTTP, SMTP, IMAP, POP3).

c ++ – Sieve premium and brute force

I was caught up by this morning question on C ++.
So I thought I was going to try.

#understand 
#understand 
#understand 

bool isPrime (std :: size_t num, std :: vector const & bonuses)
{
std :: size_t max = std :: sqrt (num);
for (auto const & prime: first)
{
if (first> max) {
return true;
}
if (num% prime == 0)
{
returns false;
}
}
return true;
}

sieve std :: size_t (std :: size size_t, std :: vector& results)
{
// primeCandidates holds 0/1 for each potential lead candidate.
// The index represents the potential prime number (index * 2 + 1)
// This allows us to ignore all the factors of 2
// max is a past the highest candidate we can test and store in primeCandidates
std :: size_t const max = size * 2 + 1;
std :: vector    primeCandidates (size, 1);

// Add some well-known prime numbers by default.
results.push_back (2);
results.push_back (3);

// We will use the technique of incrementing 2 then 4 then 2 then 4
// This means ignoring all factors of 2 and 3 automatically.
std :: size_t inc = 2;
std :: size_t loop = 5;
for (; loop <max; loop + = inc, inc = 6 - inc) {
std :: size_t index = loop / 2;

// If we find a valid candidate, add it to the results.
if (primeCandidates[index]) {
results.push_back (loop);

// Now clear all the factors of the prime number we have just found.
for (; index <primeCandidates.size (); index + = loop) {
primeCandidates[index] = 0;
}
}
}
return loop;
}

int main ()
{
std :: size_t constexpr primeRequired = 1001;
std :: size_t constexpr siveStartSize = 1000;

std :: vector    result;
result.reserve (primeRequired);

// Use the Eratosthenes sieve to get a basic set of prime numbers.
std :: size_t next = sieve (siveStartSize, result);

// Wants to reuse the 2/4/2/4 increment pattern
// So determine the correct starting point and increment value.
std :: size_t inc = next% 6 == 5? 2: 4;

// We now use brute force checking each number against all prime numbers
// that we have already found.
while (result.size () <= primeRequired) {
if (isPrime (next, result)) {
result.emplace_back (next);
}
next + = inc;
inc = 6 - inc;
}

// Display the prime numbers found
for (auto val: result) {
std :: cost << val << "";
}
std :: cout << <<  n ";
}

brute force attacks filling faiil2ban logs using the same IP addresses again and again?

Hi guys,
I have exactly the same small list of IP addresses banned by fail2ban when attempting brute force postfix sasl.

185,137,111.44 already forbidden
2019-05-27 22: 13: 40,664 fail2ban.actions [4281]: NOTE [postfix-sasl] 185.137.111.77 already banned
2019-05-27 22: 14: 13,701 fail2ban.actions [4281]: NOTE [postfix-sasl] 185.137.111.77 already banned
2019-05-27 22: 14: 20,710 fail2ban.actions [4281]: NOTE [postfix-sasl] 185.137.111.145 already forbidden
2019-05-27 22: 14: 26,717 fail2ban.actions [4281]: NOTE [postfix-sasl] 45.13.36.22 already banned

Is there some sort of loop script or something that I can use that will just allow this bot to think that it's going somewhere but does not actually hit my server … how can I do it? to bind somewhere in the space instead of filling my server fail2ban connects with it hundreds of times a day?

penetration test – WPA / WPA2 access point in brute force?

Assuming you have a list of passwords, is there an open source tool that can use this list and brutal authentication over a WPA / WPA2 wireless PSK network?

I do not try to crack a handshake or a PMKID, but make several attempts to authenticate with the help of the word list.

There is a provider who offers this, but I am specifically looking for open source.

Example of capacity I am looking for:
https://www.acrylicwifi.com/en/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX50q_gcMOY

untagged – 19 words out of 24 of BIP39 secret phrase (brute force last 5?)

I managed to lose 5 words from my 24 word phrase recovery Ledger Nano S. I have the words 1-19 but I miss words 20-24.
I have significant holdings in the wallet, so I would very much like to get it back if possible.
The passphrase is a BIP39 mnemonic (see https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki).
I have the bitcoin and ethereum public addresses for this mnemonic. I wonder if it is possible to brutally force the password.

Each word is 11 bits (2 ^ 11 = 2048 possible words).
The last word (24th) of the passphrase is of the following form [3 random bits][8 bit checksum].
Therefore, I only have to check 2 ^ (55 – 8) = 2 ^ 47 = 1,4×10 ^ 14 combinations.
I should compute SHA-512-HMAC with an iteration count of 2048.
As far as I know, this means that I will have to calculate 1.4 * 10 ^ 14 * 2048 = 2.87 * 10 ^ 17 in total.

Is there material designed for this? I know ASICs that compute sha-256 hashes but not sha-512 hashes.
I could perhaps modify one to work with sha-512 because they are very similar.

Assuming that a fairly typical ASIC is 1TH / s (10 ^ 12 hashes per second), I could exhaust the search space in 2.87 * 10 ^ 5 = 287,000 seconds = 3.3 days. I would probably get there sooner, of course (waited 1.65 days). I do not worry about the weather. Even if I have to wait for months, it does not bother me – so if I can get 10GH / s at a reasonable price, that would be great.

I would really appreciate any help / information you could provide to help me and ensure that I have not missed anything.
I could also use GPUs for this (I calculate that I can use them at about 1 / 10TH $ – so it would cost me $ 28.7K to exhaust the search space, which I will do again. there are no cheaper options).

Thank you so much,
James

mining equipment – 19 words out of 24 of passphrase BIP39 (brute force last 5?)

I managed to lose 5 words from my 24 word phrase recovery Ledger Nano S. I have the words 1-19 but I miss words 20-24. I have significant holdings in the wallet, so I would very much like to get it back if possible. The passphrase is a BIP39 mnemonic (see https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki). I have the bitcoin and ethereum public addresses for this mnemonic. I wonder if it is possible to brutally force the password.

Each word is 11 bits (2 ^ 11 = 2048 possible words). The last word (24th) of the passphrase is of the following form [3 random bits][8 bit checksum]. Therefore, I only have to check 2 ^ (55 – 8) = 2 ^ 47 = 1,4×10 ^ 14 combinations. I should compute SHA-512-HMAC with an iteration count of 2048. As far as I know, this means that I should calculate 1.4 * 10 ^ 14 * 2048 = 2.87 * 10 ^ 17 hashes in total .

Is there material designed for this? I know ASICs that compute sha-256 hashes but not sha-512 hashes. I could perhaps modify one to work with sha-512 because they are very similar.

Assuming that a fairly typical ASIC is 1TH / s (10 ^ 12 hashes per second), I could exhaust the search space in 2.87 * 10 ^ 5 = 287,000 seconds = 3.3 days. I would probably get there sooner, of course (waited 1.65 days). I do not worry about the weather. Even if I have to wait for months, it does not bother me – so if I can get 10GH / s at a reasonable price, that would be great.

I would really appreciate any help / information you could provide to help me and ensure that I have not missed anything. I could also use GPUs for this (I calculate that I can use them at about 1 / 10TH $ – so it would cost me $ 28.7K to exhaust the search space, which I will do again. there are no cheaper options).

Thank you very much, James

subdomain – Subdomain analyzer without brute force attack?

Are you looking for something like Sublist3r (https://github.com/aboul3la/Sublist3r)?

Quote his description because I can not explain it better:

Sublist3r is a python tool designed to enumerate subdomains of websites using OSINT. It helps intrusion testers and bug hunters to collect and gather subdomains for the targeted domain. Sublist3r enumerates the subdomains with the help of numerous search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, Baidu and Ask. Sublist3r also lists subdomains using Netcraft, Virustotal, ThreatCrowd, DNSdumpster, and ReverseDNS.