payment gateway – Adding paygate buttons to HTTP-only website?

Let’s say that I have a website where I want to sell homemade goods. I want customers to be able to pay for the goods without too much hassle.

A common option is to use buttons provided by a payment service like PayPal. The website uses HTTP, however, and the hosting service does not allow SSL certificates without paying for a higher hosting plan. What are the risks of using similar payment methods on my website?

One attack I am aware of, is that of an attacker redirecting the traffic to their own website — which pretends to be the payment service. I am not sure if this is even a concern for this case.

To be clear:

  • Purchases on the website will be rare, so there will be little opportunity for an attacker to intercept payments.
  • The website is hosted by a hosting service, similar to WordPress.

research – Should there be more square and round shaped buttons than there are at the moment in the main part of webpages and apps?

References regarding optimal and minimum contact area or touch target size on mobile devices (also similar question previously on UXSE here) suggest that the contact area should fit the rough size and contact point on a thumb.

Weighing up the pros and cons for a square or round shaped button or call-to-action, it doesn’t seem like there is enough square or round shaped buttons because of the amount of body text and length of characters used on labels and the typical way layouts are structured on webpages that focus a lot more on the width than height.

However, when we look at the proliferation of cards and tiles being used on many mobile apps and website home pages, it seems to suggest that they are more useful in certain types of contexts.

Also, in game interface designs where there is less emphasis on reading text (e.g. in dialogues) and more focus on interactions, buttons don’t tend to be rectangular shaped but have shapes that seem to be more fit for the purpose of optimizing the touch area.

With the more common use of voice-as-an-interface and also with more traffic now coming directly from mobile devices, is there any particular reason that there are not more square or round-shaped buttons on user interfaces? Is this a trend that we would expect to see more on the body of a webpage rather than just on the areas of the screen that are more condensed (e.g. menu headers and toolbars)?

gui design – Why do modern GUIs tend to have buttons on the side of message boxes?

Ruslan, if you look at older — dare I say, “historical?” 😉 — screenshots, you can see that button placement differs considerably between OS platforms.

The Guidebook GUI Gallery website is an awesome resource to compare such details.

I haven’t seen any research yet on the impact of left/center/right alignment of buttons in dialogs, but the general rule of striving for consistency applies to button placement as well, of course.

Placing key widgets in the same relative location in every context makes it easier for users to find them, and it reduces error rate. In particular, this applies to the key Cancel/Confirmation button pair.

Both macOS and Windows have defined simple principles on where to place those buttons, and which order they need to be in: you’ll typically find those buttons in the botton right corner of a dialog on both OSs. This convention dates back to Mac OS 7 from 1991 and to Window 95/NT4 from 1995/1996. (As seen, e.g., in Open File dialogs or Time and Date Settings.)

So I wonder: have you observed changing button placements for dialogs (or, rather, alerts) that contain more than one button, Ruslan? If not, maybe it was a purely aesthetic consideration for that particular one-button case?

social sharing buttons – What’s the unicode for the Share icon (or do I need to use SVG instead)?

A commonly recognised share icon looks like this:

Share Icon

I’m guessing there must be (surely) a Unicode symbol out there for this, but so far – despite pretty thorough searching – I’ve come up empty-handed.

I note that the approved list of new emojis for 2020 include:

  • a dodo
  • a rollerboot
  • a rainbow piñata

I’m concluding it’s unlikely that Unicode would have got as far as approving these but not yet approving a share icon.

What’s the Unicode for the share icon above, please?

Or do I need to use SVG, instead?

social sharing buttons – What’s the unicode for the Share icon?

A commonly recognised share icon looks like this:

Share Icon

I’m guessing there must be (surely) a Unicode symbol out there for this, but so far – despite pretty thorough searching – I’ve come up empty-handed.

I note that the approved list of new emojis for 2020 include:

  • a dodo
  • a rollerboot
  • a rainbow piñata

I’m concluding it’s unlikely that Unicode would have got as far as approving these but not yet approving a share icon.

What’s the Unicode for the share icon above, please?

How do form #states interact with dialog action buttons, if at all?

A dialog can be fired by a link formatted as such:

<a class="use-ajax" 
    data-dialog-options="{&quot;width&quot;:400}" 
    data-dialog-type="modal" 
    href="https://drupal.stackexchange.com/some/path">
    Some path displayed in modal dialog.
</a>

If the contents of /some/path are a form, then drupal takes its action buttons and drops them into a “footer” <div class="ui-dialog-buttonset"></div> in the dialog. This seems to take into account the initial state of the buttons — so if submit has the disabled attribute by default then the corresponding UI button gets the .is-disabled class applied. The “real” form action buttons are rendered but set to display: none.

However, I’ve got #states set up on my submit button with

$form('actions')('submit')('#states') = (
  'disabled' => (
    ':input(name="field_fivestar_rating(0)(rating)")' => (
      (
        ('value' => '-'),
        ('OR'),
        ('value' => '0'),
      ),
    ),
  ),
);

The “real” form submit button is updated correctly according to its #states attribute, but the same cannot be said for the corresponding dialog button. It seems to be static based on the initial state of the submit button.

Is this expected behavior? If so, is this something that deserves an issue in the queue? Seems like an oversight and usability concern.

sharepoint online – How to hide “Share”, “Copy Link”, “Copy to” buttons in my site?

I’m using SharePoint Online modern UI.

And, I want to hide Quick edit, Sync, Export to Excel, PowerApps, Automate, Share, Copy Link, Copy to from my site.

Please check below picture.
this is my question

I found the easy solution about PowerApps, Automate, Sync buttons in below URLs.
https://mbangert.de/hide-power-apps-and-power-automate-flow-in-sharepoint-online
https://www.sharepointdiary.com/2017/08/disable-sync-button-in-sharepoint-online.html

But I can’t find solution other buttons.
I don’t want to use SPFX if possible, but is there no choice to use SPFX?

user behavior – Why are the titlebar buttons on the left side in OS X?

Is there a reason they’re on the left?

Yes. It’s that the ultimate button in this little micro “dialog” box (Window title bar) is the destructive action of closing the window, and Apple determined the ideal order of actions to be from left to right:

| Destructive || Neutral || Constructive |

Since the button on the far left closes the window, and is therefore the most destructive possible button in a window based GUI OS, it should be on the far left of the Window status bar that is its container when using these rules of lateral action distribution. This fundamental design choice informed the decision to put the close window button on the far left, the other two actions (minimise and maximise) are placed beside it because that’s now the area that is the “dialog box action area” of the Window Title Bar.

For a brief while we had the ideal of a super-maximise-to-a-new-screen-space on the top right, double tapping the middle section of the Window Title Bar to minimise and far left being the destructive close button with the minimise and maximise buttons next to it.

But then a (wrong headed) desire to put the download button and iOS sharing button in the top right of Safari seemed to override this ideal across all of Mac OS X, and we lost the normal and rightful maximise button in this little trio. It’s been replaced with the fullscreen, new space button. I’m pretty sure this little mess wouldn’t have happened under Steve Jobs’ watch.

In answer to your original question, yes everything about OS GUI design is intentional, and has reasoning behind both the intentions and the decided design. It’s just not always transparent, and sometimes not good intentions, like the desire to transplant the ideas of iOS sharing button placement to Mac OS X.

buttons – Showing edit mode for messages

I’m working on a desktop UI that has a notes section which allows the user to submit notes and edit them afterwards. When I go into edit mode, the “save” button shows up, and I worry that it competes against the submit button (we’re not doing a return to submit, so we need to have the submit button).

I can’t decide if I should be turning it into a modal edit, or whether it’s technically ok to keep the edit mode inline like this? I’m worried that the buttons are competing. Is there anything out there that does something similar?

modal edit

templates – Swap WooCommerce product catalog ordering dropdown with buttons?

I’d like to swap the standard WooCommerce dropdown for ordering the product catalogue using buttons, yet no Google search for an easy method of doing this (or a plugin) has been fruitful.

I’m using a custom theme so any edits can be easily added!

Any suggestions as to the easiest method of displaying this as a group of buttons?

Thanks in advance,
Alex