architecture – What are common architecturally significant requirements?

Refering to the definition, architecturally significant requirements are are those requirements that have a measurable effect on a computer system’s architecture. Based on this definition both hardware and software should be considered.

I have read about the strategies for finding these requirements, but I am somehow in obsession about considering all important and common case of them.

Some of common ones are:

  1. User-Friendliness (Easy to use UI)

  2. Security of the system

  3. Consistency of the data

  4. Response time

  5. Deployment on platforms

How about the other common cases? Can we list the most common ones here?

What is the most common fix for duplicate content?

Hello friends,

 

What is the most common fix for duplicate content?

history – Was non-panchromatic film in common use long after the invention of panchromatic?

Ortho films were common as late as 1950. Panchro types were available as early as 1895 (based on the invention of tricolor technique around that time).

The famous Verichrome Pan, the commonest black and white film for American family photos as late as the 1980s, was called that to distinguish from the earlier Verichrome, which was an ortho film that was made from the 1930s until the early 1950s. “Verichrome” refers to “true color” to distinguish the film from the still earlier blue-sensitive stocks that were still familiar to photographers of the time.

Additionally, most Hollywood films shot before 1940 used ortho film — the color response of which is responsible for the green tinted makeup that appears in the 1960s TV series The Munsters — green was substituted for red on ortho films, because red lips, cheek blush, etc. recorded as unnaturally dark. Panchromatic films were available, but like many other things, cost was a big factor in film production, and panchro films generally cost more, in part because they couldn’t be packaged and produced under red safelight, but had to be produced and handled in total darkness.

Possibly related to the cited (TV series?) scene, many microfilms were orthochromatic right up until the end of the film document storage era, and as noted in a comment, scientific film stocks often had no need for red sensitivity — and even today, it’s simpler to produce an ortho emulsion than a panchro type, because a single sensitizing dye (pinacryptol yellow, found in food coloring) can add green sensitivity to a basic blue-sensitive emulsion, but red sensitivity requires more expensive and harder to obtain specialty dyes.

c# – Separate entities with common parent vs 1 entity with nullable properties

I’m working with .NET Core and Entity Framework Core and need to create an app where Employee can create 3 types of posts:

  • Idea – telling about what he think could change in organization. It have props:
  • Article Request – telling that there is need for something ex. new smartphone
  • Question

All three have some common properties which are: Id, AddedDate, Responses (list), Notifications. And each Response has list of Comments.

a) So 1st option – separate classes:

If I will make 3 separate classes with base class then I’ll end up with 3 tables for those 3 post types and there will be the same Ids for both – I mean there will be Question with Id=1, and Idea with Id=1.

On Response class I can’t reference it by PostId, because it doesn’t actually exist I would do something like that:

class BaseResponse<TPost> where TPost : BasePost {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }
    public User Author { get; set; }
    public TPost Post { get; set; }
}

class IdeaResponse : BaseResponse<Idea> {}
class ArticleRequestResponse : BaseResponse<ArticleRequest> {}
class QuestionResponse : BaseResponse<Question> {}

and in Context.cs:

public DbSet<Idea> Ideas { get; set; }
public DbSet<ArticleRequest> ArticleRequests { get; set; }
public DbSet<Question> Questions { get; set; }

public DbSet<IdeaResponse> IdeaResponses { get; set; }
public DbSet<ArticleRequestResponse> ArticleRequestResponses { get; set; }
public DbSet<QuestionResponse> QuestionResponses { get; set; }

So also 3 classes for responses, and then similar thing for notifications and also comments

b) 2nd option: 1 class with nullable properties with referenced data:

class Post {
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public DateTime AddedDate { get; set; }

    public PostType Type { get; set; { // enum

    public IdeaData IdeaData { get; set; } // != null when Type == PostType.Idea
    public ArticleRequestData ArticleRequestData { get; set; } // != null when Type == PostType.ArticleRequest
    public QuestionData QuestionData { get; set; } // != null when Type == PostType.Question
}

In that case I could create one Response class, one Notification class, and one Comment class.

Or maybe there is some other option? If something is unclear, please let me know and I will explain it in more details.

web development – Is it common practice to validate responses from 3rd party APIs?

I’m working on a PHP web application that depends on a few party services. These services are well documented and provided by fairly large organisations.

I feel paranoid when working with responses from these API which leads me to write validation code that validates that the responses match the structure and data types specified in the documentation. This mainly comes from the fact that its out with my control and if I blindly trust that the data will be correct and its not (maybe someone changes the json structure by accident), it could lead to unexpected behaviour in my application.

My question is do you think this is overkill? How does everyone else handle this situation?

Website Design – How Common Is It To Customize The Content Of Marketing Pages For Different Types Of Users?

I recently worked with a client who really likes to hide all the content that might not interest a potential client. The reasoning is that he would like to "avoid confusing the user" or "show them things that are not" in context. "

For example: XYZ offers services to individuals, small businesses and businesses. This company wants to hide / show / adjust the content of the page according to the context represented by the user.

To do this, the company offers one of two solutions:

Option 1: have "toggle buttons" at the top. When the user clicks on "Small Business" at the top, it hides / shows / rephrases the content on the whole page, but leaves a large part of the content identical (or very close).

Option 2: have links at the top that point to a page dedicated to each context. Each of the landing pages is essentially the same, but contains subtle tweaks here and there (hide / show / rephrase).

Personally, I don't like either of the two options. I think the user will be very unclear as to the different or identical content between the different contexts, because at a glance, they appear almost the same. I would prefer the client to rework this to be in (a) a static page that shows everything, and the user can decide what they are not interested in, or (b) there are individual pages for each , but they don't share any content and seem very distinct from each other.

But at the end of the day, I'm just wondering if it's common practice for marketing teams to want to hide / show content on each page for different user contexts? Or is there another solution (like the ones I mentioned) that is more preferred by many?

visas – Difference between electronic residence permit and common format residence permit for transit through the United Kingdom?

I am a Russian citizen and I am going from Italy to Bridgetown (Barbados) with a transit to London.

I will arrive at 11:05 p.m. at London Terminal 1 (LHR) with Alitalia Airlines and I will go to final destination the next day at 11:30 a.m. from London Terminal 3 (LHR) with Virgin Atlantic.

Will I need a transit visa for this route?

For the transit visa I have:

  • You arrive and leave by plane.
    Okay
  • You have a confirmed continuous flight that leaves the day of your arrival or before midnight the day after your arrival.
    Okay
  • You have the correct documents for your destination (for example a visa for this country).
    Okay
  • You have a common format residence permit issued by a European Economic Area (EEA) country I DO NOT KNOW because I have a residence permit in Italy, but I do not know if it is an electronic residence permit (which is not acceptable to transit through immigration control without visa).

In Italian, my residence permit is called "Permesso di Soggiorno Elettronico". Please help me find the difference between the electronic residence permit and the others.

Find the nth term in a sequence with no common relationship

I had this sequence 4,9,21,40,66,99,139 that i need to formulate a formula to find the n-th term. But my problem is that there is no common ratio and I cannot find the nth term because of this.

Website Design – Is It Common To Rework The Content Of Marketing Pages According To The User

I recently worked with a client who really likes to hide all the content that might not interest a potential client. The reasoning is that he would like to "avoid confusing the user" or "show them things that are not" in context. "

For example: XYZ offers services to individuals, small businesses and businesses. This company wants to hide / show / adjust the content of the page according to the context represented by the user.

To do this, the company offers one of two solutions:

Option 1: have "toggle buttons" at the top. When the user clicks on "Small Business" at the top, it hides / shows / rephrases the content on the whole page, but leaves a large part of the content identical (or very close).

Option 2: have links at the top that point to a page dedicated to each context. Each of the landing pages is essentially the same, but contains subtle tweaks here and there (hide / show / rephrase).

Personally, I don't like either of the two options. I think the user will be very unclear as to the different or identical content between the different contexts, because at a glance, they appear almost the same. I would prefer the client to rework this into (a) a static page that shows everything, and the user can decide what they are not interested in, or (b) there are individual pages for each, but they don't share any content and seem very distinct from each other.

But at the end of the day, I'm just wondering if it's common practice for marketing teams to want to hide / show content on each page for different user contexts? Or is there another solution (like the ones I mentioned) that is more preferred by many?

How common is anal sex in heterosexual couples today?

In a study in 20 cities in the United States, about 1/3 of those interviewed (men and women) reported having had anal sex in the past year. Of course, not all of these people are in serious relationships or married to each other, but more recent studies show that anal sex is much more common in heterosexuals than it was 20/25 years ago.

However, what these studies reveal is that the majority of heterosexuals do not engage in regular anal intercourse. Personally, neither my partner nor I are interested in it and we are in a long term relationship.