5th dnd – Does a creature know that she is hidden?

When a creature tries to hide, it performs a stealth test, which is compared to passive Perception of enemy creatures likely to notice it, or to a group control if there are more than one. 39; a.

Does the creature trying to hide know if it has been successfully hidden or not?

If an opposing creature decides to perform the search action by doing a Perception check to try to detect the creature that is hiding, does the creature that hides it know if it has remained hidden? ? Does the creature that is hiding know that the search action has been performed?

Dungeons and Dragons – Can you shrink and then teleport yourself inside an enemy using a different size, then again to make you bigger and blow up the creature?

So, my party is playing a god campaign and my character has divine rank 1. I chose a different size as my divine ability, but one of the benefits of being a literal god is that I can teleport myself at will as free action. My question is therefore: in combat, if I use a different size to reduce the size of a pinhead and I teleport INSIDE I'LL enemy, I use it again to expand enough for my body to explode … calculate that exactly ……

5th dnd – Use a water whip to shoot a creature that is restrained

Here is the situation:

An ally is detained and attacked by an NPC. NPC drag the character.

My character, seeing this, decides to use Water Whip on Ally. It will take damage, but as it is mastered, it will automatically fail to save dexterity and I will be able to recover it.

Water Whip states:

You can spend 2 points of ki as an action to create a water whip that pushes and pulls a creature to unbalance it. A creature you can see within 10 yards of you must make a Dexterity save roll. On a missed save, the creature suffers 3d10 bludgeoning damage, plus 1d10 extra damage for every extra Ki point spent, and you can knock it out or shoot it up to 25 feet closer to you. If saved successfully, the creature suffers half the damage and you do not shoot it or hit it.

Given that this situation is somewhat different, my deputy minister decided that there would be a "tug of war" that would take place instead of the typical backup throw of Dexterity. NPC dragging the character would rather make a Strength save through my Ki Save DC. Essentially transform my water whip into a lasso.

His logic was that you could not turn a whip into a creature attached and chained to a wall and wait for it to work.

So, basically my question is:

dnd 5th – What happens when the Immolate spell is cast on a creature immune from fire damage?

I am already aware of the question "Does a creature immune to all effects (conditions, damage, etc.) of an effect still make a saving throw?" and also "Is a creature immune to the damage type of an immune spell against the other effects of the spell?" but i do not know how to tell if the effects of a spell are "related" or not. For example, there have been the following questions: "How does the aging of the spectrum by a horrifying face interact with immunity to the terrorized disease?" and "Does immunity to fear prevent the appalling look of a mummy from paralyzing a character?" where it is controversial whether or not the effects are linked and even if the target is making a saving throw or not.

And so I wonder about the immolation spell that says:

(…) The target must make a Dexterity save roll. It takes 8d6 points of fire damage in case of failure of a backup, or half less if successful. On a failed backup, target as well burn for the duration of the spell. The target on fire emits a bright light in a radius of 30 feet and a dim light during 30 (…)

Assuming the target is immune to fire damage, does it clear if it fails the save throw? Do they make a saving throw at all?

5th dnd – What are the consequences for an unarmed creature having to perform the search action to find his weapon in combat?

Disarming in D & D seems to be very trivial, as explained in this question. The rule as written, disarming a creature does not prevent it from attacking you with that weapon in turn, as it can use its free object interaction to grab it and perform the Attack action with that weapon. It seems to me that Disarm was added afterwards, it seems almost useless, because the disarmed creature can get his weapon back immediately.

Over the years, many people have suggested using your own object interaction to keep the enemy's weapon, including Jeremy Crawford, suggesting not to do it once but at least twice.

Others have suggested creating a homebrew rule allowing opportunity attacks against a creature that is attempting to take an unarmed weapon into battle.

Although, if these two options allow you to disarm a creature more beneficial to the disarmer, one of them is not an official rule and the other one is not really intuitive, forcing you to use your own interaction just to prevent the opponent from using their own in turn.


However, what would happen if there was already a rule that improved disarmament but was simply neglected? If "Search for an unarmed weapon" was part of the Search action, all of a sudden Disarming becomes much more useful. If for an unarmed opponent to use his object interaction to retrieve his weapon, he would first have to use the Find action to find it, that would prevent him from taking the ###. ## # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Attack on the same turn, according to the stock economy. Now, an opponent could always attack instead of searching for his missing weapon. However, the unarmed weapon was probably their main weapon, which means that future attacks would probably cause less damage. For example, lose their spear 1d8 and use instead their spare weapon, a dagger 1d4. However, disarming your opponent may allow you to avoid, or at least reduce, his next turn.

As far as I know, the action of research is not used in this way. However, the wording of the search action seems to allow this and, as far as I know, there is no published list of examples of what a search action may or may not use.


So, my question is:

What are the consequences of forcing a creature that has been disarmed to search for its weapon before it can use an object interaction to retrieve it?

5th dnd – Should an unarmed creature perform the search action to find his weapon in combat?

Disarming in D & D seems to be very trivial, as explained in this question. The rule as written, disarming a creature does not prevent it from attacking you with that weapon in turn, as it can use its free object interaction to grab it and perform the Attack action with that weapon. It seems to me that Disarm was added afterwards, it seems almost useless, because the disarmed creature can get his weapon back immediately.

Over the years, many people have suggested using your own object interaction to keep the enemy's weapon, including Jeremy Crawford, suggesting not to do it once but at least twice.

Others have suggested creating a homebrew rule allowing opportunity attacks against a creature that is attempting to take an unarmed weapon into battle.

Although, if these two options allow you to disarm a creature more beneficial to the disarmer, one of them is not an official rule and the other one is not really intuitive, forcing you to use your own interaction just to prevent the opponent from using their own in turn.


However, what would happen if there was already a rule that improved disarmament but was simply neglected? If "Search for an unarmed weapon" was part of the Search action, all of a sudden Disarming becomes much more useful. If for an unarmed opponent to use his object interaction to retrieve his weapon, he would first have to use the Find action to find it, that would prevent him from taking the ###. ## # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Attack on the same turn, according to the stock economy. Now, an opponent could always attack instead of searching for his missing weapon. However, the unarmed weapon was probably their main weapon, which means that future attacks would probably cause less damage. For example, lose their spear 1d8 and use instead their spare weapon, a dagger 1d4. However, disarming your opponent may allow you to avoid, or at least reduce, his next turn.

As far as I know, the action of research is not used in this way. However, the wording of the search action seems to allow this and, as far as I know, there is no published list of examples of what a search action may or may not use.


So my question is, should a creature that has been disarmed search for its weapon before it can use an object interaction to retrieve it?

dnd 5th – If a thief thief rolls True Polymorph (a creature item), does the creature move in its two turns from the Thief's Reflexes?

The Reflexes function of the thief's thief is as follows:

When you reach the 17th level, you become a fan of ambushes and you quickly escape danger. You can take two rounds in the first round of any fight. You take your first turn at your normal initiative and your second turn at your initiative minus 10. You can not use this feature if you are surprised.

the true polymorph spell states:

[…] Object in creature. You can turn an object into any creature type, as long as the creature size is not larger than the object size and the creature's challenge score is 9 or higher. less. The creature is friendly with you and your companions. It acts on each of your turns. You decide what action he takes and how he moves. The GM has the stats of the creature and resolves all his actions and movements.

Do these work together, giving the creature an extra turn?


Note: At least one way that a thief thief could launch true polymorph is through exploits or multiclassing and using a spell parchment.

5th dnd – Does a Savethrow type attack cause critical damage to an unconscious creature?

An attack is no matter what with an attack jet; Backup throws do not have an attack roll, so they are not attacks and do not interact with the rule of the unconscious.

the Player's manual States:

If you are wondering if something you are counting as an attack, the rule is simple: if you make an attack roll, you make an attack.

(See the question "What counts as an attack?" For other evidence / aids)

Since frostbite cantrip involves a saving throw and not an attack roll, it is not an attack and is not turned into a critical hit. In fact, saving throws can not be critical hits because they do not even do it. hit. Attacks are the only things that can hit or miss, and so these are the only things that can hit or miss critically. This is explained in the question "If you roll a 1 on a saving throw against a damage spell, do you take additional damage?"

5th dnd – Do you count as "a creature within X feet" of you?

Various characteristics affect "targets within X feet".

For example, Wild Magic Sorcerer's Wild Magic Surge chart (PHB, p.104) gives the following result on a d100 result of 83-84:

Each creature within 30 feet of you suffers 1d10 necrotic damage. You gain life equal to the sum of the necrotic damage dealt.

Do you also take this damage and treat them immediately?


Below, some examples that I found while supporting you are a creature in X feet:

There is the sword flush cantrip (SCAG, 143):

(…) Every creature in range, other than you, must make a Dexterity save roll or suffer 1d6 power damage (…)

Which seems to imply that you make count as "a creature at hand".

Then there is the question "Can a character bless themselves?", And this answer indicates that "you are still within 10 meters of you".


Below are some examples that I have found by saying that you are do not "a creature in X feet":

Result of the Wild Magic Surge table of Wild Magic Sorcerer on a d100 result of 95-96:

You and all creatures within 10 yards of you become vulnerable to damage for one minute.

This seems to imply that you would do not to be considered "a creature within 30 feet".

Then there is the ice knife spell (EEPC, 19, XGtE, 157), which says:

(…) Struck or missed, the shard explodes then. The target and each creature within 5 feet of it must make a dexterity save roll or suffer 2d6 cold damage (…)

This too seems to imply that you do not count as "a creature within 5 feet".

There is also the question "Does Lightning Arrow's target also suffer secondary damage?", And this answer quotes the following unofficial tweet from rule designer Jeremy Crawford:

The splattered damage of the Lightning Arrow affects each creature within 10 feet of the target, not the target.


Do you count as "a creature within X feet" of yourself?

dnd 5th – Can a creature of 0 HP take damage?

Not exactly.

The mechanics of life points change when a character reaches 0 VP. The character can still be touched the attacks and other damaging effects, but they do not take any additional HP damage points. Instead, there are two variants:

1. Missed death saves

Instead of taking damage, a 0 HP character who is hit by an attack immediately fails to save death (two saves of death on a critical hit). This brings a character closer to death, but does not change his HP from 0.

2. Massive damage

Massive damage as well does not treat the value of individual points but is rather effective Three failed death saves at once. This occurs if the creature with 0 HP is hit by a damage effect that deals damage equal to or greater than the creature's maximum HP. Although HP damage calculation is necessary to determine this effect, the damage is not really applied in this way.