dnd 5e – Do Goliaths get cold resistance?

Both are correct at the moment, depending on which sourcebook you’re taking the stats from.

As RallozarX has already mentioned, the Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden adventure includes Goliaths as a playable race and they have added cold resistance.

D&D Beyond has obviously updated the Goliath page to include the addition from Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden.1

Volo’s Guide, however, was first released in November 2016, with the only errata to-date released roughly a year later, well before Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden which was released September 2020.

Since they can’t go back in time and change the Volo’s Guide Goliath, and since Rime of the Frostmaiden is so new, there is going to be that discrepancy. Whether or not cold resistance is errata’d into Volo’s Guide in the future, who knows.

1: Also note that even though D&D Beyond is an official source for rules, it is also 3rd party so there is the possibility of discrepancies, especially considering the Goliath D&D Beyond page still has the Elemental Evil Player’s Companion footnote.

dnd 5e – Where might one find copper wire?

I mean you could go to a metal forger with raw cooper and ask him to make thin wire. There could also be intratic jewelry which has wire as part of the design. But ultimately it is DM choice and so you can ask him where you could make a makeshift copper wire. Either it be the options mentioned above or even the corpses of constructs or wizards without a arcane focus.

dnd 5e – What kinds of training and research are possible within the paradises found within a Rod of Security?

The Rod of Security gives a person access to ‘any paradise one could imagine’, specifically:

‘… the rod then instantly transports you and up to 199 other willing creatures you can see to a paradise that exists in an extraplanar space. You choose the form that the paradise takes. It could be a tranquil garden, lovely glade, cheery tavern, immense palace, tropical island, fantastic carnival, or whatever else you can imagine.’

This ageless paradise has a 199 day limit, divided by the number of occupants staying within Example: a party of five gets ( 199 days / 5 people = ) 39.8 days maximum. Once out it takes ten days to regain this 199-day-persons capacity.

Plenty of rest, good times and amazing food (i.e. ‘possible weight-gain hazard’) – but so much free time… with incredible resources! Imagine gaining new tool proficiencies, catching up on some downtime stuff or whatever you like. But could one research old &/or new spells? Develop a formula / blueprint / pattern for almost any magic item? Research ancient lore in a paradise-library? Suddenly this rod is a very powerful item. Possibly derailing a campaign – or even presenting as a bit too powerful?

Given access to ‘any paradise’ – be that training &/or library-research – what limits exist for players’ gains in skills, abilities &/or knowledge?

dnd 5e – What is an axe beak’s travel speed in Icewind Dale?

Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden gives travel speeds for dogsleds, snowshoes, and on foot (p. 11). On the same page, it says that dogsleds, at 1mph, are the fastest way to get around in the Dale.

However, this section says nothing about axe beaks, which p. 20 offers as a travel option. How fast would these travel?

My gut says if they are speedier than sled dogs (50 vs 40 feet per round, per MM), they might run 1.25 mph. Is this the best/proper way to calculate it? How does this reconcile with sled dogs being the fastest travel method (p. 11)? Do sled dog rest requirements (1 hour after an hour of pulling, p. 20) factor into the answer at all?

dnd 5e – Necromancy subclass balance suggestion?

I am using This as the base. My homebrew is a subclass added to the ones already existing: Guides of the Forgotten

GUIDE OF THE FORGOTTEN

Necromancer subclass
Lore:
Guides of the Forgotten are determined to make the new world remember the old, the ones that once were. To uncover the potential of those long forgotten. The fossils of Dinosaurs revived by necrotic magic, brought to new life. They are trained in the mastery of will. Determination is key. To force one’s beliefs on the World is the essence of necromancy, to force the dead to raise because you want them to raise. Guides of the forgotten have mastered this ancient art of WILL. Their strength of conviction combined with necromancy allows them to restore and revive bodies which haven’t moved for millions of years. For a given amount of time, that is. However, they can extend this time through use of WILL. The will of a Soul can be captured after death. In the moments where the Soul leaves the Body a skilled necromancer can capture the will of a Soul for later use such as lengthening the time a body can be sustained with necrotic energy.

Body decay system

Determines duration and Strength of reanimated things:

  • missing limbs etc.
  • Disfigured
    Necrotic energy recreates the missing body parts, this energy lasts for a set amount of time, depending on the creature. After this time, the dismembered body drops to the ground, it then has a 1 in 3 chance of breaking. Roll a d6, 1 or 2 means it breaks.
  • after death, a body can be reanimated into a undead who remains under your control till death
  • after decay (3 hours), can be reanimated into a zombie. This zombie remains under your control for 24h, after that he will remain still, only defending himself from attacks
  • fossilized bones and other remains of creatures, need to be found or bought.
    Fossils can be assembled into a fossilized skeleton if all pieces of one creature are obtained. They then count as a body.

All creatures summoned have an ac of 10, while HP is based on CR

CR : HP

  • 1: 11hp
  • 2: 17hp
  • 3: 26hp
  • 4: 42hp
  • 5: 51hp
  • 6: 62hp

Restriction from level 1: Guides of the forgotten cannot cast spells higher than fourth level. The power of will comes with a curse, the arcanum is limited to guides of the forgotten, since magic is like a river, searching for the way of least resistance. The stubborn way of the guides builds a dam for magic, only allowing drips to run through.

Passive ability at level 3: Guides of the Forgotten gain a feeling for the will of others, especially shortly before dying. They can harness will-points after a soul leaves a body, or a will gets reincarnated into a body. Roll a d4-1 to determine the amount of will-points gathered if a creature died within 20 feet of you or any undead under your control. You can spend will points on your turn, with a maximum of your level per round.

Will: When a Will is captured, it can enchant a fossil through a ritual (4h) The enchanted fossil is protected from breaking of natural/spell(self) causes. It can still be destroyed by Players/NPCs. If a will enchanted fossil is destroyed, the will escapes, unless you cast bound will in your next round.
Will points:
You can have a maximum of your level times 4 Will-points.

Free use

  • For 1 will point you can issue a command to one undead under your control. This does not count as an action/bonus action.
  • For 1 will point you can give your undead 1d4 temporary health. This does not count as an action/bonus action (max. is the double of the creatures maximum hp)
  • For 1 will point you can expand the time of a disfigured undead for (in combat for 1 round) 3 hours. This does not count as an action/bonus action
    Bonus Action
  • For 2 will points you can double the speed of an undead under your control. (does not stack)
  • For 2 will points you can increase the AC of an undead you control by 2. (max. AC of 17)
  • For 2 will points you can transfer hp from yourself to one undead creature (as temporary hp) under your control, or the other way around. (maximum of 15 temp. hp above max hp through this ability)
    Action
  • For 3 will points one undead creature under your control deals 3d4 extra damage
  • For 5 will points you can prevent a fatal blow to an undead under your control, but its hit points drop to 1d6 (this can be used as a reaction in an enemies turn)
    Ability at level 6: your fossils count as one CR higher, this affects hp only. Their default AC increases by 2.

Ability at level 10: you gather twice as many will points.

Spells:

  • Reanimate fossil:
    second level (V; S; M) a fossil, after spell ends there is a 1/3 chance of it breaking
    fossil needs to be as close as 40 feet to the caster
    Action-instant cast: Reanimate Fossil for three rounds in combat if the CR of this creature is 3 or less. If it is higher it will last for two rounds of combat. If outside of combat, it lasts an hour no matter the CR.
  • Explode undead
    First level spell (S; M) an undead under your control
    Undead needs to be in 100 feet of caster
    Action-instant cast: target an undead you control; through your power of mind their body attracts necrotic energy and will collect it for a maximum of three rounds. You can detonate it manually for a bonus action. It explodes in an 20ft radius. In the first round it deals 2d4 plus2 necrotic damage. In the second 4d4 plus4, and in the third 6d4 plus6 necrotic damage.

Cantrips:

Bound will Bonus Action (S,M – An empty glass vial):

To capture the Will of a dying creature, one has to possess an empty glass container and cast the cantrip bound will within your next turn after the creature’s death. You can posses a number of Wills equal to half your level rounded down. If a Will is captured, roll a d4-1 to determine the gathered will-points.

Fossil pieces:

  • Tooth
  • Claw
  • Spine
  • Rib
  • Skull – needed to summon a creature
  • Arm
  • Leg

These are the components needed to create one fossilized skeleton. A fossilized skeleton will not decay and is counted as a body. For every additional part of the same skeleton you pay half of the previous price

Fossil costs:

  • T-rex (CR 12) = 650 gp
  • Tarbosaurus (CR 8) = 400 gp
  • Yutyrannos (CR 3) = 20 gold
  • Troodon (CR 1/8) = 5 silber
  • Therizinosaurus (CR 5) = 100 gp
  • Stegosaurus (CR 5) = 100 gp
  • Hatzegopteryx (CR 2) = 10 gold
  • Plateosaurus (CR 2) = 8 gold
  • Pachycephalosaurs (CR ½) = 2 gold
  • Nodosaurus (CR 3) = 20 gold
  • Gallimimus (CR 2) = 8 gold
  • (Feathered) Velociraptor (CR ¼) = 1 gold
  • Dilophosaurus (CR 2) = 10 gold
  • Carnotaurus(CR 4) = 45 gold
  • Allosaurus(CR 2) = 8 gold
  • Compsognathus (C ½) = 2 gold
  • Dimetrodon (CR 2) = 8 gold
  • Plesiosaurus (CR 2) = 10 gold
  • Pteranodon (CR ¼) = 1 gold
  • Deinonychus (CR 1) = 5 gold
  • Triceratops (CR 5) = 100 gp

dnd 5e – Can the Produce Flame cantrip be used to grapple, or as an unarmed strike, in the right circumstances?

The flame does not affect an unarmed strike or a grapple

Holding a flame in your hand does not influence the mechanics of an unarmed strike. An unarmed strike is:

a punch, kick, head–butt, or similar forceful blow… (which on a hit) deals bludgeoning damage equal to 1 + your Strength modifier.

Nothing restricts you utilizing an unarmed strike while holding the fire from produce flame, but nothing about the spell description affects the unarmed strike.

It’s unclear to me how a hand that is currently holding a flame could be considered free, but even if it is, the same would hold for grapples as would for unarmed strikes. Nothing about the spell implies any different interaction.

Improvised Weapon

In order to qualify as an Improvised Weapon, the thing in question must be an object (emphasis mine):

An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands

The fire from produce flame is a spell effect, not an object.

Ask your GM

Since this is for a silly one shot, ask your GM if he can work with you to allow this anyway in some form.

It may be fairly balanced if it is simply changing the damage type of your unarmed strikes or serves as an improvised weapon (dealing 1d4 damage). However, I caution against increasing the numerical damage output of the unarmed strike using this technique. Monks are very capable of dishing out many attacks in a turn, so any increase to the damage compounds quickly.

Additionally, as noted by ThomasMarkov in comments, it takes a 2nd level spell, magic weapon, to do something similar in improving the damage output of a weapon. A cantrip should not be able to do something comparable in power. I recommend sticking with 1d4 as a damage die.

dnd 5e – Can the Produce Flame cantrip be used to grapple, or as an unarmed strike, in the right circumstances?

The flame does not affect an unarmed strike or a grapple

Holding a flame in your hand does not influence the mechanics of an unarmed strike. An unarmed strike is:

a punch, kick, head–butt, or similar forceful blow… (which on a hit) deals bludgeoning damage equal to 1 + your Strength modifier.

Nothing restricts you utilizing an unarmed strike while holding the fire from produce flame, but nothing about the spell description affects the unarmed strike.

It’s unclear to me how a hand that is currently holding a flame could be considered free, but even if it is, the same would hold for grapples as would for unarmed strikes. Nothing about the spell implies any different interaction.

Improvised Weapon

In order to qualify as an Improvised Weapon, the thing in question must be an object (emphasis mine):

An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands

The fire from produce flame is a spell effect, not an object.

Ask your GM

Since this is for a silly one shot, ask your GM if he can work with you to allow this anyway in some form.

It may be fairly balanced if it is simply changing the damage type of your unarmed strikes or serves as an improvised weapon (dealing 1d4 damage). However, I caution against increasing the numerical damage output of the unarmed strike using this technique. Monks are very capable of dishing out many attacks in a turn, so any increase to the damage compounds quickly.

Additionally, as noted by ThomasMarkov in comments, it takes a 2nd level spell, magic weapon, to do something similar in improving the damage output of a weapon. A cantrip should not be able to do something comparable in power. I recommend sticking with 1d4 as a damage die.

dnd 5e – How to give a whale barding?

RAW: It’ll cost 6000 gp; you should use fabricate

The rules for barding (PHB p. 155) don’t account for size so the armour for any sized creature costs four times and weigh twice that of normal armour (as listed on PHB p. 145). This brings the barding in at 6000 gp and 130 lb. This is ostensibly the cost of having the armour made, although your DM might require the blacksmith to be persuaded to undertake such an odd task.

If you want to save money and have time to spare (and proficiency in Smith’s tools) you could make it yourself. Using the rules for crafting nonmagical items (PHB p. 187) you need materials equal to half the market value (3000 gp) and make 5gp worth of progress per day, a requiring mere 1200 days which is only slightly more than 3 years. Unfortunately, as you’re going to have to get this custom made (presumably) it’s going to take any smith the same amount of work days to get this done (the workdays can be shared between multiple smiths to reduce total time).

If you want a bit more expeditious progress you will need a Wizard friend. (I mean, we all need a Wizard friend.) A 7th-level (or higher) wizard, specifically, and one that is proficient with smith’s tools. The spell we’re after is fabricate which will let the Wizard transform raw materials into armour (among other, similar uses). Fabricate is (for metals) limited to a 5 ft. cube, which depending on how well whale barding can be tetrised into a cube, might require more than one casting (your DM’s call).

Also, if you don’t have a Wizard who would be willing to work for free and have to rely on Wizards-for-hire, that will cost you an amount up to your DM, as there are no rules specified in the Spellcasting services ‘rules’ (PHB p. 159).

The above assumed a whale would need as much (or little) barding as ‘regular’ mounts. These span the size range between Mastiffs (Medium) to Elephants (Huge). While not specifically addressed it is implied that the barding rules apply to all of these, likely in the interest of simplicity. However, your DM might require that effective armour for a whale need to cover more of its body than an elephant needs.

Also, there is no stat block for blue whales (as far I know) and the closest is Sperm Whale (from Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden) which are Gargantuan. Blue whales are even bigger, though there’s no greater creature size for them to be.

Therefore, your DM might rule that whale barding is double (or more) that of normal barding, which would apply that same multiplier to all the numbers given above (not the Wizard level). You have 6k gp and 6 years of your life to spend on this, right?

This is of course only the matter of obtaining the armour. Putting it on the whale is also gonna be non-trivial. The rules for getting into armour (PHB p. 146) puts donning heavy armour to 10 minutes. This is probably unrealistic. Whales don’t have handsCitation Needed! and so can’t help itself. Even assuming the whale is cooperative in this endeavour, you are probably gonna have to put this stuff in water unless you want go through the process of beaching and unbeaching (debeaching?) a whale.

Let’s talk about Armoured Whales

We’ll start with the rules-as-written effects of plate armour on a whale. For these purposes we’ll use the stats of a Sperm Whale. Firstly, its AC will become 18 (this was the point presumably). It fulfills the Strength score requirement (26 > 15); however, it is unlikely that whales are naturally proficient in heavy armour, and the downsides to that suck. While losing spellcasting probably isn’t going to affect the whale too badly, disadvantage on any roll (ability check, saving throw, or attack) that uses Strength or Dexterity is quite crippling.

How to train your whale (in heavy armour) is up to you though. I can’t help you. The whale is going to have disadvantage on Dexterity (Stealth) regardless. A Killer Whale has a carrying capacity of 3120 lb, though, so even with a lot of barding, it shouldn’t be encumbered. Quadrupled of normal barding (520 lb) and using the variant encumbrance rules (PHB p. 176), the whale is not encumbered (could carry 520 lb without being so), and even if it were, its speed would only be reduced by 10 ft. There are (to my knowledge) no rules which says being underwater affects such capacities. This seems like the point to mention that D&D is not a physics simulator. There is nothing given in D&D for how armour affects a whale’s ability to swim, but there are a lot of edge cases which aren’t covered super well (read: left to DM fiat).

Wrapping a whale (or pretty much anything else) in metal plating will increase its density. Increasing a whale’s density will likely make it sink. This is going to be very bad for your whale. You have in some sense made a whale-filled metal capsule and might be about to find out whether your DM’s world contains a version of the RSPCA and how aggressive they are.1

Assuming the whale doesn’t drown immediately, there are a couple of long term problems. Firstly, you have made armour out of (medieval) steel and whales live in water. Steel rusts. Armour which rusts is at best going to fall off and at worst we’re back to whale filled capsules — only now with a lovely patina. Of course you could get meteoric iron (which is nickel rich), but that’s gonna be a lot harder to track down.

Secondly, wearing plate armour all the time isn’t going to be very comfortable and your whale is going to have a hard time doffing it on its own. Humans need help putting plate armour on (which is a big part of why knights have squires) and unless your whale has some miraculously dexterous flippers it’s gonna need help.


1: See this list to translate into your local version of this joke.

dnd 5e – Can you attack with a Loading and different weapon in the same turn?

Yes, the loading property doesn’t care about other weapons.

The loading property says:

Because of the time required to load this weapon, you can fire only one piece of ammunition from it when you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to fire it, regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

This restricts only the use of the weapon fired, and doesn’t say anything about other weapons, so if you have more than one attack per Attack action, the other attack(s) can be made with another weapon. Note, the action economy can be tricky. You have to be already holding the other weapon, or you can use your free object interaction to draw it. If you have already used your object interaction this turn for something else, you would not be able to draw a weapon after firing a hand crossbow. This answer gets more into the details of the action economy at work here.

dnd 5e – Can you attack more than once using multiple weapons with the “loading” property?

… kind of…

The rules on loading weapons say the following (emphasis mine):

Because of the time required to load this weapon, you can fire only one piece of ammunition from it when you use an action, bonus action, or reaction to fire it, regardless of the number of attacks you can normally make.

This reads as one piece of ammunition fired per weapon. The extra attack class feature does not specify whether the extra attacks can be with one or multiple weapons. In light of this, I would personally rule that you can use multiple weapons, but it is not explicitly stated in the rules. However, this will only work once. It takes an object interaction to reload the crossbow (index refers to objects: using during combat, which suggests that reloading your crossbow costs an interact with object, requiring you to use your action if you want to do it twice in a round), which means that you can shoot both of the crossbows, but can only reload one of them in a round (or two, if you use your action). You might be able to fire twice during two turns in combat, though. If you fire both crossbows with extra attack and then spend your free interact with object to reload one crossbow, you end the turn with one loaded crossbow. Then, at the start of your next turn, you spend your free interact with object to reload the other crossbow, and fire both. You then end the turn with no loaded crossbows, and you’re back to firing one crossbow per turn.

Interestingly, the rules on two-weapon fighting are not at all helpful in this case. The rules on two-weapon fighting state the following (emphasis mine):

When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand, you can use a bonus action to attack with a different light melee weapon that you’re holding in the other hand. You don’t add your ability modifier to the damage of the bonus attack, unless that modifier is negative.

If either weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon, instead of making a melee attack with it.

This means that two-weapon fighting doesn’t allow her to fire the second crossbow as a bonus action. Furthermore, if she is holding a light melee weapon, such as a shortsword or dagger, and a hand crossbow, she has to choose between firing the crossbow and using the melee weapon.

The only way to fire two hand crossbows in one turn (ignoring extra attack) is with the Crossbow Expert feat, which (among other things) states the following (emphasis mine):

When you use the attack action and attack with a one-handed weapon, you can use a bonus action to attack with a loaded hand crossbow you are holding.

Note that the feat doesn’t state melee weapon, which allows you to fire the second hand crossbow as a bonus action.


In conclusion, I wanted to summarize the different ways to attack using hand crossbows in 5e.

  • dual wielding two hand crossbows, without extra attack or crossbow expert. This allows you to make one attack per turn, and one attack only. Wielding a sword in one hand and a crossbow in the other allows you to choose, but you still don’t get a bonus action attack.
  • dual wielding two hand crossbows, with extra attack, but without crossbow expert. This allows you to make two attacks during your first turn, and possibly your second turn, depending on what your DM is willing to allow (technically legal using RAW, but is an obvious target of house rules)
  • dual wielding two hand crossbows, without extra attack, but with crossbow expert. This allows you one attack during your action, and one as a bonus action. Having a melee weapon in your main hand also allows you to fire the hand crossbow as a bonus action.
  • Dual wielding two hand crossbows, with both extra attack and crossbow expert. This allows you to make up to 5 attacks with your hand crossbows, 4 from extra attack, and one from the crossbow expert bonus action, depending on your class.

Your specific example is number two, allowing you two attacks on the first (and possibly second) turn(s), and only one on every turn after that.