Why aren’t search engines indexing my content?

There are a number of reasons your content may not appear in search
engine results, however, it is important to note that
a search engine’s
index may contain pages that it doesn’t display in its
results
page
.

How to tell if your content is actually indexed

It may actually be difficult to tell if your content is indexed.

  • Search for all the documents from your site and see how many are listed
    • Google: enter site:example.com (where example.com is your domain, there must not be any space after the colon.)
    • Bing: enter site: example.com
    • Yahoo: enter site: example.com (or use advanced search form)
  • Search for a specific document by a unique sentence of eight to twelve words and search for that sentence in quotes. For example, to find this document, you might choose to search for “number of reasons your content may not appear in search engine results”
  • In addition to above, search for keywords using inurl: and intitle: you may try something like, keyword with another keyword inurl:example.com this will bring upi pages that are indexed only for specified domain.

    • Log into webmaster tools to see stats from the search engine itself about how many pages are indexed from the site
    • Google Webmaster Tools – Information is available under “Health” » “Index Status”. If you have submitted site maps, you can also see how many documents in each site map file have been indexed.
    • Bing Webmaster Tools

In some cases, documents may not appear to be indexed via one of
these methods, but documents can be found in the index using other
methods. For example, webmaster tools may report that few documents
are indexed even when you can search for their sentences and find the
documents on the search engine. In such a case, the documents are
actually indexed.

How content becomes indexed

Before search engines index content, they must find it using a
web crawler.
You should check your webserver’s logs to see whether
search engines’ crawlers (identified by their user agent – e.g.
Googlebot,
Bing/MSNbot)
are visiting your site.

Larger search engines like Google and Bing typically crawl sites
frequently, but the crawler may not know about new site. You can
notify search engines to the existence of your site by
registering as its webmaster (Google Webmaster
Tools
, Bing Webmaster
Tools
) or, if the search
engine does not provide this facility, submitting a link to its
crawlers (e.g. Yahoo).

How long has your site/content been online?

Search engines may index content very
quickly after it has been found, however, these updates are occasionally delayed.
Smaller search engines can also be much less responsive and take weeks to index
new content.

If your content has only been online for several days and does not have
any links from other sites (or its links come from sites which
crawlers do not visit frequently) it is probably not indexed.
If your site hasn’t been live for more than a few months, the search engines
may not trust it enough to index much content from it yet.

Has the content been excluded by the webmaster?

This step is especially important if you are taking over a site from
someone else and there is an issue with a specific page or directory:
check for
robots.txt
and META
robots

exclusions and remove them if you want crawlers to index the content
being excluded.

Is there a technical issue preventing your content from being indexed?

If you have an established site but specific content is not being
indexed (there are no web crawler hits on the URLs where the content
resides) the webmaster tools provided by Google and Bing may provide
useful diagnostic information.

Google’s Crawl
Errors

documentation provides extensive background on common problems for web
crawlers which prevent content from being indexed and, if you use
Google Webmaster Tools, you will receive an alert if any of these
issues are detected on your site.

Correct errors and misconfigurations as quickly as possible to ensure
that all of your site’s content is indexed.

Is the content low quality?

Search engines don’t index most pages they crawl. They only index the highest quality content. Search engines will not index content if:

  • It is spam, gibberish, or nonsense.
  • It is found elsewhere. When search engines find duplicate content, they choose only one of the duplicates to index. Usually that is the original that has more reputation and links.
  • It is thin. It needs more than a couple lines of original text. Preferably much more. Automatically created pages with little content such as a page for each of your users are unlikely to get indexed.
  • It doesn’t have enough reputation or links. A page may be buried too deep in your site to rank. Any page without external links and more than a few clicks from the home page is unlikely to get indexed.

Is some of your content indexed, but not all?

If your site has hundreds of pages, Google will almost never choose to index every single page. If you site has tens of thousands of pages, it is very common for Google to choose to index only a small portion of those pages.

Google chooses the number of pages to index from a site based on the site’s overall reputation and the quality of the content. Google typically indexes a larger percent of a site over time as the site’s reputation grows.

Why aren’t search engines indexing my content?

There are a number of reasons your content may not appear in search
engine results, however, it is important to note that
a search engine’s
index may contain pages that it doesn’t display in its
results
page
.

How to tell if your content is actually indexed

It may actually be difficult to tell if your content is indexed.

  • Search for all the documents from your site and see how many are listed
    • Google: enter site:example.com (where example.com is your domain, there must not be any space after the colon.)
    • Bing: enter site: example.com
    • Yahoo: enter site: example.com (or use advanced search form)
  • Search for a specific document by a unique sentence of eight to twelve words and search for that sentence in quotes. For example, to find this document, you might choose to search for “number of reasons your content may not appear in search engine results”
  • In addition to above, search for keywords using inurl: and intitle: you may try something like, keyword with another keyword inurl:example.com this will bring upi pages that are indexed only for specified domain.

    • Log into webmaster tools to see stats from the search engine itself about how many pages are indexed from the site
    • Google Webmaster Tools – Information is available under “Health” » “Index Status”. If you have submitted site maps, you can also see how many documents in each site map file have been indexed.
    • Bing Webmaster Tools

In some cases, documents may not appear to be indexed via one of
these methods, but documents can be found in the index using other
methods. For example, webmaster tools may report that few documents
are indexed even when you can search for their sentences and find the
documents on the search engine. In such a case, the documents are
actually indexed.

How content becomes indexed

Before search engines index content, they must find it using a
web crawler.
You should check your webserver’s logs to see whether
search engines’ crawlers (identified by their user agent – e.g.
Googlebot,
Bing/MSNbot)
are visiting your site.

Larger search engines like Google and Bing typically crawl sites
frequently, but the crawler may not know about new site. You can
notify search engines to the existence of your site by
registering as its webmaster (Google Webmaster
Tools
, Bing Webmaster
Tools
) or, if the search
engine does not provide this facility, submitting a link to its
crawlers (e.g. Yahoo).

How long has your site/content been online?

Search engines may index content very
quickly after it has been found, however, these updates are occasionally delayed.
Smaller search engines can also be much less responsive and take weeks to index
new content.

If your content has only been online for several days and does not have
any links from other sites (or its links come from sites which
crawlers do not visit frequently) it is probably not indexed.
If your site hasn’t been live for more than a few months, the search engines
may not trust it enough to index much content from it yet.

Has the content been excluded by the webmaster?

This step is especially important if you are taking over a site from
someone else and there is an issue with a specific page or directory:
check for
robots.txt
and META
robots

exclusions and remove them if you want crawlers to index the content
being excluded.

Is there a technical issue preventing your content from being indexed?

If you have an established site but specific content is not being
indexed (there are no web crawler hits on the URLs where the content
resides) the webmaster tools provided by Google and Bing may provide
useful diagnostic information.

Google’s Crawl
Errors

documentation provides extensive background on common problems for web
crawlers which prevent content from being indexed and, if you use
Google Webmaster Tools, you will receive an alert if any of these
issues are detected on your site.

Correct errors and misconfigurations as quickly as possible to ensure
that all of your site’s content is indexed.

Is the content low quality?

Search engines don’t index most pages they crawl. They only index the highest quality content. Search engines will not index content if:

  • It is spam, gibberish, or nonsense.
  • It is found elsewhere. When search engines find duplicate content, they choose only one of the duplicates to index. Usually that is the original that has more reputation and links.
  • It is thin. It needs more than a couple lines of original text. Preferably much more. Automatically created pages with little content such as a page for each of your users are unlikely to get indexed.
  • It doesn’t have enough reputation or links. A page may be buried too deep in your site to rank. Any page without external links and more than a few clicks from the home page is unlikely to get indexed.

Is some of your content indexed, but not all?

If your site has hundreds of pages, Google will almost never choose to index every single page. If you site has tens of thousands of pages, it is very common for Google to choose to index only a small portion of those pages.

Google chooses the number of pages to index from a site based on the site’s overall reputation and the quality of the content. Google typically indexes a larger percent of a site over time as the site’s reputation grows.

web hosting – Search engines indexing only the old site which has been moved to a subdomain

I recently took up a project for a website overhaul. I went on to deploy my website on the client’s hosting service. It uses cPanel. On the hosting service they had the old version of the website.

I moved that to a subdomain named old.example.com. I rigged my version of the website to the main domain. Everything seems to work except for one thing.

If I search the web for their website, the only search result that appears is the old.example.com. The only way to access the current version is via direct link.

The old version of the website was maintained by another outside developer.

Is it possible the old developer is running some sort of indexing service or what not on their version that automatically updates the domain of their site or is this some sort of cPanel option that I can change?

Forgive any vagueness in the question, if there is more info that I should provide, I’ll add it in an edit. It’s also important to note that the clients aren’t all too tech savvy so the amount of info I can acquire is quite limited.

redirects – How to prevent discovery of URLs by search engines?

The best way to not make the site accessible is not to serve it. You can block bots by denying access via the user-agent string but that can be spoofed by malicious crawlers.

The example provided makes not attempts at redirecting traffic through the desired URL which lets users and bots crawl the site via 4 versions (https://www.example.com, http://www.example.com, https://example.com and http://example.com). By adding a few lines to your .htaccess file, you can permanently redirect traffic to the three undesired protocol and host combinations which means you will no longer be serving pages with URLs you don’t want. There are different ways to do this but here is one:

RewriteEngine on

RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off
RewriteRule ^/?(.*)$ https://www.example.com/$1 (R=301,L)

RewriteCond %{HTTPS} on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www.example.com$
RewriteRule ^/?(.*)$ https://www.example.com/$1 (R=301,L)

Without the above or something equivalent, all 4 versions are accessible and even without links to the URLs you don’t want, I found that they eventually get accessed occasionally. It’s not clear why but I’ve seen it many times in logs.

Since this is a new site, you may even not redirect at all and return 404 not found since there is no incoming links to preserve but it’s usually good to redirect in case users type the site from memory and don’t enter it the way you expect.

How can I change the use of Bluetooth headset to phone controled engines?

I want to use Bluetooth speaker board and connect a mini motor (like the ones in the toy’s )
insisted than the speakers and control it by my phone is it possible ?

And how can I reprogram the board to take other orders than the sound ?

No targets to post to (maybe blocked by search engines, no scheduled posting)

i wan to fix this failed, i try to some fix but not success. I want to help, thank you 

Why aren’t search engines indexing my content?

There are a number of reasons your content may not appear in search
engine results, however, it is important to note that
a search engine’s
index may contain pages that it doesn’t display in its
results
page
.

How to tell if your content is actually indexed

It may actually be difficult to tell if your content is indexed.

  • Search for all the documents from your site and see how many are listed
    • Google: enter site:example.com (where example.com is your domain, there must not be any space after the colon.)
    • Bing: enter site: example.com
    • Yahoo: enter site: example.com (or use advanced search form)
  • Search for a specific document by a unique sentence of eight to twelve words and search for that sentence in quotes. For example, to find this document, you might choose to search for “number of reasons your content may not appear in search engine results”
  • In addition to above, search for keywords using inurl: and intitle: you may try something like, keyword with another keyword inurl:example.com this will bring upi pages that are indexed only for specified domain.

    • Log into webmaster tools to see stats from the search engine itself about how many pages are indexed from the site
    • Google Webmaster Tools – Information is available under “Health” » “Index Status”. If you have submitted site maps, you can also see how many documents in each site map file have been indexed.
    • Bing Webmaster Tools

In some cases, documents may not appear to be indexed via one of
these methods, but documents can be found in the index using other
methods. For example, webmaster tools may report that few documents
are indexed even when you can search for their sentences and find the
documents on the search engine. In such a case, the documents are
actually indexed.

How content becomes indexed

Before search engines index content, they must find it using a
web crawler.
You should check your webserver’s logs to see whether
search engines’ crawlers (identified by their user agent – e.g.
Googlebot,
Bing/MSNbot)
are visiting your site.

Larger search engines like Google and Bing typically crawl sites
frequently, but the crawler may not know about new site. You can
notify search engines to the existence of your site by
registering as its webmaster (Google Webmaster
Tools
, Bing Webmaster
Tools
) or, if the search
engine does not provide this facility, submitting a link to its
crawlers (e.g. Yahoo).

How long has your site/content been online?

Search engines may index content very
quickly after it has been found, however, these updates are occasionally delayed.
Smaller search engines can also be much less responsive and take weeks to index
new content.

If your content has only been online for several days and does not have
any links from other sites (or its links come from sites which
crawlers do not visit frequently) it is probably not indexed.
If your site hasn’t been live for more than a few months, the search engines
may not trust it enough to index much content from it yet.

Has the content been excluded by the webmaster?

This step is especially important if you are taking over a site from
someone else and there is an issue with a specific page or directory:
check for
robots.txt
and META
robots

exclusions and remove them if you want crawlers to index the content
being excluded.

Is there a technical issue preventing your content from being indexed?

If you have an established site but specific content is not being
indexed (there are no web crawler hits on the URLs where the content
resides) the webmaster tools provided by Google and Bing may provide
useful diagnostic information.

Google’s Crawl
Errors

documentation provides extensive background on common problems for web
crawlers which prevent content from being indexed and, if you use
Google Webmaster Tools, you will receive an alert if any of these
issues are detected on your site.

Correct errors and misconfigurations as quickly as possible to ensure
that all of your site’s content is indexed.

Is the content low quality?

Search engines don’t index most pages they crawl. They only index the highest quality content. Search engines will not index content if:

  • It is spam, gibberish, or nonsense.
  • It is found elsewhere. When search engines find duplicate content, they choose only one of the duplicates to index. Usually that is the original that has more reputation and links.
  • It is thin. It needs more than a couple lines of original text. Preferably much more. Automatically created pages with little content such as a page for each of your users are unlikely to get indexed.
  • It doesn’t have enough reputation or links. A page may be buried too deep in your site to rank. Any page without external links and more than a few clicks from the home page is unlikely to get indexed.

Is some of your content indexed, but not all?

If your site has hundreds of pages, Google will almost never choose to index every single page. If you site has tens of thousands of pages, it is very common for Google to choose to index only a small portion of those pages.

Google chooses the number of pages to index from a site based on the site’s overall reputation and the quality of the content. Google typically indexes a larger percent of a site over time as the site’s reputation grows.

html – How do search engines treat spaces that are not U+20?

A problem with writing HTML pages for agglutinative languages, is that search engines generally work poorly when trying to parse them. Often-times, searches with correctly written concatenated words will be suggested rewritten to the incorrect form.

Example of Google replacing correctly concatenated word form with incorrect word form

In the above example, Google suggests that splitting the word ‘solcellepanelforskning’ (‘research on solar panels’ would be the correctly spelt word, which of course it isn’t. Now, for those writing web pages, this matters. You need to write your headings in a way that yields the most hits to your page. There are generally only three options here that I am aware of:

  1. Train search engines.
  2. Incorrectly space the words, but use letter-spacing to make it look right.
  3. Incorrectly space the words, but with either ​ (zero width space) or  (zero width no-break space).

1: Train search engines

It may not be a meme, but training Google to prefer giraffes is documented. Ads is one thing, but the number of hits a page gets will get the more attention from Google or other search engines. This is in other words, doable, but it requires labour and lots of it.

2: CSS-trick letter-spacing

The trick is simple enough to execute (combination of span class and a similar class performing the desired spacing), but this has to issues: You get messy HTML for one, but what is even worse, is that oral readers will incorrectly insert a pause between words, where there should be none. An example of this in English, would be the difference between ‘every day’ and ‘everyday’.

3: Zero width spaces

These have the advantage of removing the need for a special class defined in CSS, yielding a somewhat (though admittedly not much) less messy HTML code. However, considering that this are not standard, this could perhaps cause problems with rendering on some devices. Further, you still get the issue (I would assume) with oral readers, as stated in 2 supra.

How do search engines treat none-  spaces? And for bonus points, which of options two and three would be the better choice, if one desires compatibility across renderers, both visual and oral ones?

seo – Acquired domain name linked to bad reputation on search engines due to previous owner

If a example.com is purchased, but has a history of fraud or some other heinous crime by its previous owners, such that search engine results show 10 pages and more of complaints from defrauded investors or victims on various web forums, what can they new owner and webmaster of the domain do to clean up those search results, or be able to separate itself from its checkered history which has no connection whatsoever to the new owner?

Is negative SEO the only thing that can be done? what else? especially to prevent those victims from claiming that their abuser is back online?

What Are The Top 5 Search Engines 2021?