An API to get the geographical coordinates and neighborhoods of a city?

Hello

I wonder if there is an API that lists the coordinates and names of neighborhoods of a particular city. I've seen some systems that use this feature, they load the paths polygons according to

geolocation – Transform the postal code into geographical coordinates in R

Hello

I have zip code data from different schools in Brazil, in an xlsx file. I would like to convert these data into geographical coordinates (latitude and longitude). The problem is that when I use the geocode () function, I only get the location of a school.

Geographical targeting of Facebook ads

Is the geographic targeting of Facebook ads appropriate for your business?

mysql – Save geographical points, in the controller, error in ajax

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I have a few points on the map, which are loaded by an Ajax query.

In my controller, I have this:

public function recogerForm(Request $request)
{

    $marker = new Marker;
    $marker->name = $request->nombre;
    $marker->address = $request->direccion;

    $marker->idG = $request->idG;

    $pos = strpos($request->LatLng, ',');
    $latitud = substr($request->LatLng, 1, $pos-1);
    $longitud = substr($request->LatLng, $pos+1,strlen($request->LatLng));

    $marker->lat = $latitud;
    $marker->lng = $longitud;
    $marker->idMarker = '1';//$request->id;

    $marker->save();

    return $request;
}

In my course, I have the following items:

Route::post('/bus','MapaProcesarController@recogerForm');

In my js:

 function save_marker(marker, place, i) {
//Save new marker using jQuery Ajax
var mLatLang = marker.getPosition().toUrlValue(); //get marker position
var myData = { id: i, name: place.name, address: place.vicinity, latlong: mLatLang, idG: place.id }; //post variables
console.log(myData);
$.ajax({
  type: "POST",
  url: "/bus",
  data: myData,
  headers: { 'X-CSRF-TOKEN': $('meta(name="csrf-token")').attr('content') },
  success: function (data) {

    var url = "/guardar";
    $form = $('
') $form.append(''); $form.append(''); $form.append(''); $form.append(''); $form.append(''); $form.append(''); $form.append('
'); $('.preForm').append($form); $(".nombre" + data.id).val(data.name); $(".direccion" + data.id).val(data.address); $(".LatLng" + data.id).val(data.latlong); $(".idG" + data.id).val(data.idG); $(".idMarker" + data.id).val(data.id); //console.log(myData); }, error: function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) { alert(thrownError); //throw any errors } });

When I try to insert into my database, Ajax commits an error if I delete the code from the database and leave it

return request

, that does not make me a mistake, why, why can not I save all the points of my database? On the other hand, if I do not save them, I have no problem?

Mineral basins – How to determine the geographical distribution of hashrate?

While blockchain.info provides a hashrate distribution, it is aggregated at the pool level, whereas I would like to know more about how hashrate is distributed between pool servers.

This is not possible to determine with certainty. When a Bitcoin block is exploited, there is no way to determine which node / pool is exploiting it. Block browser sites such as blockchain.info examine database database data during a transaction perhaps link the block to a particular pool. For example, if you look at the last extracted block 594 041, the coinbase transaction contains the coinbase data as follows:

037910091a4d696e656420627920416e74506f6f6c39331400332020d34beafabe6d6d38d664d05278d5312fc43b4a47d259012d94db2c113f41e0ee36a6711161138004000000000000006cbf008036030000

The first octet 0x03 indicates to put the next three bytes in the stack. Then bytes 0x791009 indicates the height of the block (594041 in this case) in little-endian. Then, if you look at the bytes 0x4d696e656420627920416e74506f6f6c it represents "Mined by AntPool" in ASCII. This is what explorers use to say that the block was undermined by Ant Pool. Nothing prevents me from exploiting a block tomorrow with the coinbase data that points to a particular pool when in reality it has nothing to do with them. Block Explorer sites will use these false data to indicate on their websites that the block has been undermined by the name of the pool in which I snuck.

Several aggregation Web sites, including blockchain.info, maintain low latency connections to thousands of nodes and log the IP address of the first connected node to relay each block.

These data are also unreliable. I can run a virtual private network, operate a block and relay it over the network with an IP address thousands of miles from my current location. In addition, you can run a complete Bitcoin node on your computer, which would completely hide your identity.

hashpower – Determination of the geographical distribution of hashrate

I would map the distribution of hashrate geographically, which would require knowing the winning miner's IP address for each block.
According to the article by Miller et al. See: https://www.cs.umd.edu/projects/coinscope/coinscope.pdf
Several aggregation Web sites, including blockchain.info, maintain low latency connections to thousands of nodes and log the IP address of the first connected node to relay each block. Is this information provided somewhere? While blockchain.info provides a hashrate distribution, it is aggregated at the pool level, whereas I would like to know more about how hashrate is distributed between pool servers.

Darkness world – Which geographical area would be the easiest start for vampire players: The masquerade today?

After talking with friends visiting a country around the world, I found myself thinking about "Where will it be easy to be a vampire?" (Yes, I know, I'm wondering strange questions), that I turn into "Which geographic area would be the easiest start for vampire players: The masquerade today?"

While searching, I decided to cut the world into 9 areas (I tried to use facts and only that, and it was really interesting):

  • Western Europe: Firearms are prohibited, so hunting is easier in the early hours of the night, but many people do not go out late at night.
  • Eastern Europe: more weapons and arms being allowed officially or indirectly, making hunting more difficult, but the government has more means of controlling information to facilitate the preservation of the masquerade, but Firstlight will find it too.
  • North America: The use of the weapon is allowed in most cases, making hunting more dangerous, but their people stay outside all night and it is easier to find prey, but all is open 24/7 so you can live without the need for a ghoul.
  • South America: like Eastern Europe, but with more nature, werewolves could kill you more often
  • Africa: the whole region is more or less at war, it is difficult to live as a human being
  • Middle East: The Antediluvians are here and wake up, so this is not a good place to be a Kindred (or a human being)
  • Northeast Asia: Most of Northeast Asia is Russia, so it is like Eastern Europe
  • South Asia: The government is strong, so it is easier to preserve the masquerade, but Firstlight will find you easier too. The Kuei-Jins are here so maybe it's hard to be a vampire
  • Oceania: the word "all the fauna and flora want to kill you" does not apply to you, and the control of weapons is enlarged, so hunting is easier

So I think Oceania is the easiest region to start as a vampire, followed by Western Europe and North America. But I may be wrong in the statements I made with my research (I only take 2 hours to do it).

og

BlackHatKings: General Discussion on PPC
Posted by: Jamesreimb
Post time: June 20, 2019 at 22:56.

Modified geographical target of my blog on the Google Search Console, how long will it take to see the results?

Changing the geographical targeting of my unlisted blog to my country about a month ago, but so far, I have seen no results, I have seen no effect of the change. How long will it take to see the effects of change?

terms of taxonomy – effective organization of the geographical state / region / content for entries

It's kind of a general question, but maybe someone has an idea.

I have a database that will have more than 300,000 entries. Each of these entries will have multiple entries for "location" – no specific locations, nor gps coordinators. These are regions, around the world. And there can be many locations for each entry.

The first attempt is to create a taxonomy of locations from which to choose, with a hierarchy of content -> sub-continent -> country -> state / department / province. In the input form for each element, a selection list extracts each region of the taxonomy and allows you to explore smaller regions in a next drop-down list, with each selection.

I did not think it would become such a burden for the system, but it certainly used such a large set of taxonomy terms in one vocabulary. Maybe someone found a lighter way to do it?