Hasselblad: Which lenses mount on which cameras?

Im interested in the Hasselblad digital system and I would like to know which lenses mount on which cameras. Im especially interested in the H4D and H5D cameras. Which lenses are compatible with these cameras?

film – What is causing the light leak in my Hasselblad A12 back?

After finding very similar pictures of leaks online, and talking to an experienced repair guy, I found out that the leak is caused by an improperly closing auxiliary shutter.

The Hasselblad V series has two flaps on the back of the body, which need to make a proper seal together to prevent light that is coming through the viewfinder from reaching the film plane. In my body, these just don’t touch perfectly snugly.

photo

How much travel time will I use with Canon tilting lenses on a Hasselblad x1d with an adapter?

The Hasselblad X1D II is equipped with a sensor of 43.8 mm x 32.9 mm. This gives a diagonal of just under 55mm and an aspect ratio of 4: 3 or 1.333: 1.

With the two objectives in question, and assuming that you want to preserve focus in infinity using the 44mm lens distance recording:

  • You give up pretty much the possibility of all Move with the TS-E 45mm f / 2.8 because you only have 1.5 mm to resell at each corner of the frame. Most lenses are designed to leave about as much space between the absolute edge of the image circle and the usable part of the picture circle.
  • You would have a little more leeway with the use of the TS-E 24mm f / 3.5L II (make sure and confirm that the measurement you use of the 67mm picture circle applies to one of the two variants of the 24mm TS-E you are using). thinking). You would normally have about 4.5mm at each corner to play (4.5mm + 1.5mm = 6mm x 2 = 12mm), but this is in the diagonal direction of the sensor. If you want to move in a horizontal direction from the long side of the sensor, you can move about 3.6 mm in both directions. Moving vertically relative to the long side of the sensor, you would be limited to about 2.7 mm of movement.

And what would be the corresponding focal length, approximately?

The focal length of each lens will not change, it will always focus on 24mm and 45mm lenses. The larger size of the sensor will give a larger angle of view that the same goals would look on a camera 35mm / FF. Your "culture factor" would be about 0.8X. Using the 43.8 x 32.9 mm sensor would give similar results. diagonal viewing angles such as the 19mm and 35mm lenses would result in the use of a 35mm / FF camera. Keep in mind that the aspect ratio is different. The largest sensor measures 4: 3 or 1.333: 1, while the smaller 35mm / FF sensor measures 3: 2 or 1.5: 1. This gives you a slightly more vertical coverage and a slightly less horizontal coverage with the Hasselblad. after the application of "cropping". factor "that you would get with a 35mm / FF camera.

cannon – Tilt shift with Hasselblad x1d

The Hasselblad X1D II is equipped with a sensor of 43.8 mm x 32.9 mm. This gives a diagonal of just under 55mm and an aspect ratio of 4: 3 or 1.333: 1.

With the two objectives in question, and assuming that you want to preserve focus in infinity using the 44mm lens distance recording:

  • You give up pretty much the possibility of all Move with the TS-E 45mm f / 2.8 because you only have 1.5 mm to resell at each corner of the frame. Most lenses are designed to leave about as much space between the absolute edge of the image circle and the usable part of the picture circle.
  • You would have a little more leeway with the use of the TS-E 24mm f / 3.5L II (make sure and confirm that the measurement you use of the 67mm picture circle applies to one of the two variants of the 24mm TS-E you are using). thinking). You would normally have about 4.5mm at each corner to play (4.5mm + 1.5mm = 6mm x 2 = 12mm), but this is in the diagonal direction of the sensor. If you want to move in a horizontal direction from the long side of the sensor, you can move about 3.6 mm in both directions. Moving vertically relative to the long side of the sensor, you would be limited to about 2.7 mm of movement.

And what would be the corresponding focal length, approximately?

The focal length of each lens will not change, it will always focus on 24mm and 45mm lenses. The larger size of the sensor will give a larger angle of view that the same goals would look on a camera 35mm / FF. Your "culture factor" would be about 0.8X. Using the 43.8 x 32.9 mm sensor would give similar results. diagonal viewing angles such as the 19mm and 35mm lenses would result in the use of a 35mm / FF camera. Keep in mind that the aspect ratio is different. The largest sensor measures 4: 3 or 1.333: 1, while the smaller 35mm / FF sensor measures 3: 2 or 1.5: 1. This gives you a slightly more vertical coverage and a slightly less horizontal coverage with the Hasselblad. after the application of "cropping". factor "that you would get with a 35mm / FF camera.

How big is the filter thread for a Hasselblad 80mm lens?

In addition @JindraLacko answer

There are actually two ways to get filters on Hasselblad 80mm lenses (and all blade lenses). The Bay 50 or Bay 60 mounts correspond to the sizes of the inner mount for the C / C T * or later CF lenses, respectively. The lenses also have the option of mounting an external bellows sun visor capable of holding gel-type filters of different sizes. This allows you to effectively mount any type of translucent plastic filter in front of the lens.

For reasons of completeness, the Hasselblad does not have thread size For example, the Bay system is the abbreviation of Bayonet. The filters are retained via a single notch that engages in less than a quarter of a turn.


The exception to the answer above is the 50mm lens that filters Series 8 filters and requires a mounting ring.

lens – Hasselblad 250mm mounted on my Nikon full frame camera … what is its effective focal length?

The Hasselblad lens (250mm) was designed for 120 or 220 roll film … if I successfully mount it on a 35mm full-frame camera, how long does the lens last?

250mm.

What is the effective focal length?

250mm.

Indeed, the "Effective Focal Length" is based on the viewing angle achieved by a particular focal length when used with full-frame 36 x 24 mm cameras (a / k / a format). 35mm "135).

It is used on a medium format camera using a frame size of 6 x 4.5 (a / k / a "645") with exposed dimensions of 56 x 41.5 mm, a lens of 250 mm would have an "effective focal length" of about 155 mm. would give the same diagonal angle of view as a 155mm lens on a 36 x 24 millimeter FF camera.

When used on a medium-format camera that uses a 6 x 6 frame size with apparent dimensions of 56 x 56 mm, a 250 mm lens would have an "effective focal length" of about 135 mm because it would give the same angle diagonal lens 135 mm lens on a 36 x 24 mm FF camera.

6 x 4.5 (a / k / a "645") is probably the most common image size for 120/220 movies. With the other formats, the width of 56 mm remains constant (because it is the maximum usable width of the short side of the film strip), but the length lengthens progressively in the direction of the length of the film.

80mm = 80mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 50mm on a 645 format camera.
100mm = 100mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 65mm on a 645 format camera.
250mm = 250mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 155mm on a 645 format camera.

Hasselblad's most popular devices used 120 exposed films with a 6 x 6 (56 x 56 mm) frame. Since the diagonal of a 6 x 6 frame is longer, the conversion factor changes.

80mm = 80mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 44mm on a 6 x 6 format camera.
100mm = 100mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 55mm on a 6 x 6 format camera.
250mm = 250mm on the FF camera, "effective focal length" of 135mm on a 6 x 6 format camera.

lens – Hasselblad 250 m / m mounted on my Nikon full frame camera … what is its effective focal length?

The focal length of a lens is a measure of its power of magnification. The focal length of a lens remains unchanged despite everything. In other words, swap an objective between different cameras of different formats and the size of the objects remains unchanged.

That being said, what changes is the angle of view. Think of a movie projected on a screen, we substitute different sizes of screen during the projection of the film. The size of the projected image of the objects does not change, but the screen size change encompasses different image sizes (formats).

The Hasselblad format would be 6 cm by 6 cm. The actual image on the frame of the film measures 56 mm by 56 mm. The diagonal measurement (angle-angle) of this format is 80 mm. If we mount an 80 mm, the lens offers a viewing angle of 53 ° diagonally and 38.5 ° horizontally.

Mount the same lens on a 35mm full-frame camera and this lens projects a 24 x 36mm image. The diagonal measurement of this rectangle is 43 mm. Since this format is smaller, only the central part of the projected image of the lens can be used. In other words, the size of the screen is reduced. Now the viewing angles are reduced to 30.3 ° diagonally and 25.4 ° horizontally.

Mount 100 mm and the viewing angle changes to 24.4 diagonally and 20.4 horizontally. Mount a 250 mm and diagonal angle of view will be 9.9 ° diagonally and 8.2 ° horizontally.

Photo Management – What can Hasselblad Phocus do with JPEGs?

I started using Hasselblad Phocus (3.3.6) to organize and clean my photo collection. After shooting mainly in JPEG, the items of the menu White Balance and Noise Filter are missing. I can not find anything in the documentation. Is it really true that these menu items are only active for RAW images?