product identification – What edition of traveller is this?

I have an PDF of a traveller core rulebook, but I can’t seem to figure out what edition it is. There is a character sheet in the back, but I haven’t been able to find the sheet anywhere else.

The cover looks like this:
enter image description here

And the Character Sheet looks like this:

enter image description here

I haven’t been able to find a definite publication date.

product identification – Does anyone know the name of this RPG featuring possessed villagers in the Yorkshire Dales ca. 1980’s?

Years ago as a youngster I played an RPG book that was set in the Yorkshire Dales. I recall the story goes; you as the main character travel up to a remote Yorkshire mining village from London to visit a friend.

The village, surrounding areas and the mines have been overtaken by locals who have become possessed turning into zombies and other monsters. The weapons you have available are things like shotguns and kerosine bombs. I remember it begins by you walking up a country road to your friend’s house after journeying up to Yorkshire, it describes the moon being too high in the sky for the time of year as the starting narrative. A zombie/possessed man attacks you jumping out of the hedgerow on the roadside as the first enemy you face. You find the friend’s house abandoned and note left behind for you.

I would love to know the title of this book as I can’t find it online by a descriptive search, it was probably published in the 1980’s. I loved playing it as the concept and narrative were brilliant. I recall it was not one of the Steve Jackson / Ian Livingstone franchise titles but was an independent publication possibly published before they cornered the market on RPG books. If anyone can help me identify this book I’d be most grateful.

product identification – Help me identify these 20-sided dice with assorted numbers from 4 to 72

I went and Googled for the numbers, and the first (and currently only) result was US patent 7815191B2 titled “Equals: the game of strategy for the basic facts”. The abstract reads:

“An open rectangular prism with rotating cubes on dowel rods, two 12-sided dice, and three 20-sided dice invented with an accompanying method of use to function as a game to assist students in remembering the basic math facts including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.”

and further on, in the “detailed description of the invention”, the dice are described as follows (emphasis mine):

“5. The dice: The 12-sided dice are a different color from the 20-sided dice. The numbers are clear so that there is a way to understand the difference between the numbers on the dice. Dice 1 and 2 are dodecahedrons. Dice 3, 4, and 5 are icosahedrons.

  • A. Dice 1 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 3, 5, & 7
  • B. Dice2 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 4, 6, & 8
  • C. Dice3 printed numbers: 4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 24, 28, 35, 36, 42, 49, 54, 56, 64, & 72
  • D. Dice 4 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 18, 24, 25, 27, 30, 32, 36, 40, 45, 48, 63 & 81
  • E. Dice 5 printed numbers: 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 16, 21, 25, 27, 28, 32, 35, 36, 42, 48, 49, 54, 56, 64, & 72″

So I guess that’s where they’re from.


Ps. While there seem to be quite a few math games named “Equals” (such as this one), searching for the full title of the patent works better and turns up a bunch of sites that sell (or at least used to sell) the game in question.

Alas, it seems like the game’s original web site (playequals.com) no longer works, but the Wayback Machine does have an archived copy.

There also (thanks, Someone_Evil) appears to be a new site located at playequals.jimdofree.com which includes some YouTube videos (#1, #2) demonstrating the gameplay — although, alas, apparently only the simplest game mode, using only the two 12-sided dice. The site even has a combined PDF product flyer for all of its products, which contains the best picture of the actual game that I’ve been able to locate so far, including all of the dice:

Picture of "Equals: the game of strategy for the basic facts"


Pps. The patent describes four different game modes: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Of these, only the multiplication mode actually uses the 20-sided dice:

“C. Multiplication:

To set up the board: Have each player choose a side. Each side has 2 sets of numbers with a symbol in the middle. Choose the multiplication symbol in the middle of the sets of numbers so that it faces up. Choose the numbers 1-9 on both sides of the multiplication symbol so that they face up.

To play: Roll dice 3, 4, and 5 at the same time. (These dice have 20 sides). Select one of the numbers rolled to be the product of two numbers on opposite sides of the multiplication symbol. Choose a number on each side of the multiplication symbol that when multiplied will equal one of the numbers rolled. (…)”

Given this, we can have some insight into how the numbers on the 20-sided dice were chosen: they’re all products of two numbers between 1 and 9 inclusive, with the factors distributed somewhat uniformly across the interval:

begin{array}{|c|c|c|}
hline
textbf{Die 3} &
textbf{Die 4} &
textbf{Die 5} \
hline
begin{aligned}
4 &= 1 times 4 = 2 times 2 \
5 &= 1 times 5 \
7 &= 1 times 7 \
10 &= 2 times 5 \
12 &= 2 times 6 = 3 times 4 \
15 &= 3 times 5 \
16 &= 2 times 8 = 4 times 4 \
18 &= 2 times 9 = 3 times 6 \
20 &= 4 times 5 \
21 &= 3 times 7 \
24 &= 3 times 8 = 4 times 6 \
28 &= 4 times 7 \
35 &= 5 times 7 \
36 &= 4 times 9 = 6 times 6 \
42 &= 6 times 7 \
49 &= 7 times 7 \
54 &= 6 times 9 \
56 &= 7 times 8 \
64 &= 8 times 8 \
72 &= 8 times 9 \
end{aligned} &
begin{aligned}
1 &= 1 times 1 \
2 &= 1 times 2 \
3 &= 1 times 3 \
6 &= 1 times 6 = 2 times 3 \
8 &= 1 times 8 = 2 times 4 \
9 &= 1 times 9 = 3 times 3 \
12 &= 2 times 6 = 3 times 4 \
14 &= 2 times 7 \
18 &= 2 times 9 = 3 times 6 \
24 &= 3 times 8 = 4 times 6 \
25 &= 5 times 5 \
27 &= 3 times 9 \
30 &= 5 times 6 \
32 &= 4 times 8 \
36 &= 4 times 9 = 6 times 6 \
40 &= 5 times 8 \
45 &= 5 times 9 \
48 &= 6 times 8 \
63 &= 7 times 9 \
81 &= 9 times 9 \
end{aligned} &
begin{aligned}
4 &= 1 times 4 = 2 times 2 \
6 &= 1 times 6 = 2 times 3 \
8 &= 1 times 8 = 2 times 4 \
9 &= 1 times 9 = 3 times 3 \
12 &= 2 times 6 = 3 times 4 \
16 &= 2 times 8 = 4 times 4 \
21 &= 3 times 7 \
25 &= 5 times 5 \
27 &= 3 times 9 \
28 &= 4 times 7 \
32 &= 4 times 8 \
35 &= 5 times 7 \
36 &= 4 times 9 = 6 times 6 \
42 &= 6 times 7 \
48 &= 6 times 8 \
49 &= 7 times 7 \
54 &= 6 times 9 \
56 &= 7 times 8 \
64 &= 8 times 8 \
72 &= 8 times 9 \
end{aligned} \
hline
end{array}

(FWIW, the only numbers that occur on all three dice are 12 = 2 × 6 = 3 × 4 and 36 = 4 × 9 = 6 × 6.)

We can even calculate the exact probability of each number from 1 to 9 being a possible choice for a multiplicand on the first roll using a quick AnyDice script, which produces the following output:

Results: 1: 52%, 2: 61%, 3: 63%, 4: 68%, 5: 46%, 6: 68%, 7: 59%, 8: 63%, 9: 61%

It turns out the 1 and 5 are the least likely factors to work, which kind of makes sense for a game intended to teach multiplication, since multiplying by those numbers is particularly easy in base 10.

I doubt that any particularly deep statistical analysis went into the game design, though. Most likely the inventor just took a single-digit multiplication table and distributed the products more or less randomly across three 20-sided dice, doubling or tripling specific ones that they considered most pedagogically relevant.

product identification – Help me identify these 20-sided dice with random numbers from 4 to 72

I went and Googled for the numbers, and the first (and currently only) result was US patent 7815191B2 titled “Equals: the game of strategy for the basic facts”. The abstract reads:

“An open rectangular prism with rotating cubes on dowel rods, two 12-sided dice, and three 20-sided dice invented with an accompanying method of use to function as a game to assist students in remembering the basic math facts including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.”

and further on, in the “detailed description of the invention”, the dice are described as follows (emphasis mine):

“5. The dice: The 12-sided dice are a different color from the 20-sided dice. The numbers are clear so that there is a way to understand the difference between the numbers on the dice. Dice 1 and 2 are dodecahedrons. Dice 3, 4, and 5 are icosahedrons.

  • A. Dice 1 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 3, 5, & 7
  • B. Dice2 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 4, 6, & 8
  • C. Dice3 printed numbers: 4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 24, 28, 35, 36, 42, 49, 54, 56, 64, & 72
  • D. Dice 4 printed numbers: 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 18, 24, 25, 27, 30, 32, 36, 40, 45, 48, 63 & 81
  • E. Dice 5 printed numbers: 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 16, 21, 25, 27, 28, 32, 35, 36, 42, 48, 49, 54, 56, 64, & 72″

So I guess that’s where they’re from.


Ps. While there seem to be quite a few math games named “Equals” (such as this one), searching for the full title of the patent works better and turns up a bunch of sites that sell (or at least used to sell) the game in question.

Alas, it seems like the game’s original web site (playequals.com) no longer works, but the Wayback Machine does have an archived copy.

There also (thanks, Someone_Evil) appears to be a new site located at playequals.jimdofree.com which includes some YouTube videos (#1, #2) demonstrating the gameplay — although, alas, apparently only the simplest game mode, using only the two 12-sided dice. The site even has a combined PDF product flyer for all of its products, which contains the best picture of the actual game that I’ve been able to locate so far, including all of the dice:

Picture of "Equals: the game of strategy for the basic facts"

How long does the identification process take?

I started a separate page as a Santa to be able to contact families as Santa because of all the COVID restrictions. I went to sign in and it’s asking for ID etc. well of course I gave my real ID. It’s been 2 days and I have had no response. If someone from Facebook is reading this my profile is Santa MacClaus.

How long does this process take?

Thank you all in advance.

product identification – Help me identify these dice

I have these dice. I don’t know where they came from or how I got them, and I can’t imagine what they are for. They are 20-sided dice but the numbers on the sides are bananas.

See image

enter image description here

Numbers on them are:
4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 24, 28, 35, 36, 42, 49, 54, 56, 64, 72

I really don’t see an overall pattern here. Opposite sides don’t add up to any consistent number. And for some reason I have two of these dice.

Laws requiring identification at hotel check-in

I know that in many non-US countries they require identification to check into hotels. However, in the United States I am not aware of any laws that require this. Do they exist?

The reason I ask is that I have attempted to anonymously check into hotels in the United States and found it very difficult to do. For example, one conversation went this way (note that this is an in-person conversation, I am literally standing right in front of the guy at the desk with my bags):

Desk: I need a credit card and a driver’s license.

Me: Why do you need to see a driver’s license?

Desk: To verify the credit card.

Me: I plan to pay cash.

Desk: I still need a credit card.

Me: Why?

Desk: To guarantee your room.

Me: I will pay cash UP FRONT for the full amount of the stay plus a
substantial deposit which will cover any miscellaneous charges.

Desk: I still need a credit card.

Me: Why?

Desk: I don’t know, I just need it.

I have had similar conversations at several different hotels. What is going on here? Is there some secret law or something that hotels have to record your identity in the United States?

Maybe a better question would be: is it possible to check into a hotel in the United States without a driver’s license and credit card?

Note I am talking about a walk-in, not making reservation. In other words just walking up to the hotel and attempting to check in, then and there, no reservation involved.

identity – Identification through digital signature. How safe is it?

Let’s say I want to give some data to Bob. I have his public key. I tell him to generate a digital signature for text “{some_stuff: 1, nonce: 2}”. After he does that and after I verify it’s the right signature, I give him the data. I use a different nonce for each session. Is there anything I need to be aware of? Is it pretty secure?

authentication – Craigslist type site for domain/website asks for my selfie with identification card – Unsafe?

Flippa is a website that lets sellers of domains and website list their properties for sale.
They do not handle funds, escrow d0t com and/or paypal handles the sales.
After taking my money for listing (250) I was able to sell my website.
When it came to finish sale, told me that in order to proceed to escrow d0t com that I must:
Upload selfie with my govt id, scan both sides of id, AND also do a “liveness video.”
I was a bit alarmed and looked in the their partner.
They use a company that does KYC verification. Find it strange flippa, a non-financial company, is using KYC.
Anyway the company they use claims to be based out of London.
Which is is not true, their address in London is paid virtual business office.
They are a Russian company, with russian founders and employees.
No hate on Russia but as an American I am not comfortable uploading all this private info JUST to complete a website sale!

Is this even legal for Flippa to do?
Flippa also says they store the information I sent them.
I don’t like that they only ask me to complete this AFTER they have my money.

TL;DR
A company that offers listing service for domains wants my selfie with my govt id. They use verification service that obscures that they’re based in Russia. Is this safe?

I wander somewhen treated face identification?

Does anyone by chance had the use of face detection using Buxtank ?