The Real Reasons People Join Forex – General Forex Questions & Help

the most logic reason is to make profit, keep it, and repeat. any traders should think that way, each traders willing to be a succesfull one. while the success of a Forex trader directly depend on his or her trading skilled, experience, knowledge and determination. On the other hand, a good trading broker is another important point for a trader to be a regular profitable Forex trader. by the way, after joining in Forex, I try many brokers to find a suitable trading condition match my trading system, it’s almost a years i held my ecn account with Armada Markets which ensure best trading facilities. honestly, their trading environment are friendly use for any trading strategies.

Unable to invite people who like my business page to join my group

Hi Greenhorn,

I got the same message, trying to set up a group and link my page with 1600 followers to it. My page though has recently been shadow-banned. Could that be the reason? I am apparently in FB jail. 🙁 I searched the internet for a solution but apart from you, I found noone experiencing the same kind of problem. One can get shadowbanned because one posts too much in too little time, but also for political content. This can last a day, two days, a week up to six weeks, I read. FB won’t tell you. I think this is the reason our groups can’t invite our fans, because our posts are hidden to them. Our entire fanbase is locked off from our page, as it were. Only people visiting our page can see and like our posts. Did you in the meantime, find a solution? All the best Nilufar

 

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postgresql – VERY slow lateral join on relatively small database

My database consists of apps and their reviews (schema below). I’m trying to answer the following question:

Given a series of dates from the earliest reviews.review_date to the latest reviews.review_date (incrementing by a day), for each date, D, which apps had the most reviews if the app’s earliest review was on or later than D?

This is the query that I’ve come up with to try and answer that question:

select
  review_windows.review_window_start,
  id,
  slug,
  review_total,
  earliest_review
from
  (
    select
      date_trunc('day', review_windows.review_windows) :: date as review_window_start
    from
      generate_series(
        (
          SELECT
            min(reviews.review_date)
          FROM
            reviews
        ),
        (
          SELECT
            max(reviews.review_date)
          FROM
            reviews
        ),
        '1 day'
      ) review_windows
    order by
      1 desc
  ) review_windows
  left join lateral (
    SELECT
      apps.id,
      apps.slug,
      count(reviews.*) as review_total,
      min(reviews.review_date) as earliest_review
    FROM
      reviews
      INNER JOIN apps ON apps.id = reviews.app_id
    where
      reviews.review_date >= review_windows.review_window_start
    group by
      1,
      2
    having
      min(reviews.review_date) >= review_windows.review_window_start
    order by
      3 desc,
      4 desc
    limit
      2
  ) apps_most_reviews on true;

It is extremely slow and I’m not sure why. If I want any kinds of results I use week instead of day in the generate_series call and even then that might take a minute or even longer.

Where should I start when debugging a performance issue like this?

Visualized query plan here

There are ~5K rows in apps and ~400K rows in reviews so it’s a mystery to me why this is taking so long.

Running the individual subquery that is run for each entry in the lateral join given a single date only takes 161 ms (below) and the subquery for generate_series only takes 4 ms. I’m clearly doing something very wrong. Any help would be much appreciated!

Individual subquery with an explicit date

SELECT
  apps.id,
  apps.slug,
  count(reviews.*) as review_total,
  min(reviews.review_date) as earliest_review
FROM
  reviews
  INNER JOIN apps ON apps.id = reviews.app_id
where
  reviews.review_date >= '2018-04-17'::date
group by
  1,
  2
having
  min(reviews.review_date) >= '2018-04-17'::date
order by
  3 desc,
  4 desc
limit
  2

apps

Schema

|   | column_name | data_type    | is_nullable | foreign_key |
|---|-------------|--------------|-------------|-------------|
| 1 | id          | int4         | NO          |             |
| 2 | name        | varchar(255) | NO          |             |
| 3 | slug        | varchar(255) | NO          |             |

Indexes

| index_name      | index_algorithm | is_unique | column_name |
|-----------------|-----------------|-----------|-------------|
| apps_slug_index | BTREE           | t         | slug        |
| apps_pkey       | BTREE           | t         | id          |

reviews

Schema

|   | column_name   | data_type    | is_nullable | foreign_key     |
|---|---------------|--------------|-------------|-----------------|
| 1 | id            | int4         | NO          |                 |
| 2 | rating        | int4         | NO          |                 |
| 3 | review_date   | date         | NO          |                 |
| 4 | reviewer_name | varchar(255) | NO          |                 |
| 5 | review_body   | text         | NO          |                 |
| 6 | app_id        | int4         | NO          | public.apps(id) |

Indexes

| index_name                  | index_algorithm | is_unique | column_name   |
|-----------------------------|-----------------|-----------|---------------|
| reviews_reviewer_name_index | BTREE           | f         | reviewer_name |
| reviews_review_date_index   | BTREE           | f         | review_date   |
| reviews_pkey                | BTREE           | t         | id            |
| reviews_app_id_index        | BTREE           | f         | app_id        |

consensus – In blockchain, if no new members join the network can we prove that there will not be anymore forks before a certain point in history?

I would like to know if we can allow new members to join with the promise that they will not attempt to create a new fork however hard it may prove to be, before a certain point in history. To this effect; if no new members join the network for let’s say a month, can we prove that there will not be anymore forks before a certain point in history?

I frankly feel the two statements are paradoxical. Actually I want to know if we can add a rule to the blockchain to say if it ran for a month with at most N number of nodes and all did not fork, then the network won’t allow forks before that point in time, starting from let’s say 2 months later.

python – Como hcer INNER JOIN entre 5 modelos en DJANGO

Tengo 4 modelos:

as_assistence
as_expenses
as_concept_expenses
fac_invoice
fac_costumer

    class as_asisstence(models.Model):
    idRecord = models.ForeignKey(as_record, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    
    class as_record(models.Model):
    idCompany = models.ForeignKey(as_company, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    idOpening = models.ForeignKey(User, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)   
    
    class as_expenses(models.Model):
    idAssistence = models.ForeignKey(as_asisstence, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    idTypeExpenses = models.ForeignKey(nom_type_expenses, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)

    class as_concept_expenses(models.Model):
    idExpenses = models.ForeignKey(as_expenses, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    idProvider = models.ForeignKey(as_company, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    idFacSupplierInvoice = models.ForeignKey(fac_supplier_invoice, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)

    class fac_supplier_invoice(models.Model):
    idSupplierCustomer = models.ForeignKey(fac_supplier_costumer, blank=True, null=True, on_delete=models.CASCADE)

    class fac_supplier_costumer (models.Model):
    ...

Necesito enlazar , usando DJANGO, desde fac_supplier_costumer hasta as_record, ya lo he intentado haciendo INNER JOIN pero x alguna razon no me deja hacerlo entre mas de 4 tablas.

dnd 5e – What is the best way to help a new player join a mid-level party?

First, consider what you’re trying to determine. Here are some suggestions:

  • Is the player comfortable with the game, DM, and other players, enough to enjoy playing?
  • Is the player comfortable with the basic rules?
  • Is the player comfortable with the character’s backstory?
  • Is the player comfortable with the character’s specific abilities?
  • What notable events in the character’s backstory inform their Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws?
  • What is the character’s place in the world?
  • What is the character’s place in the plot?
  • What parts of the world don’t the party usually see?

Fortunately, there’s a great way to determine all of the above.

I suggest running a session that focuses on two or three formative events from this character’s past.

The Rules

It should be clear to everyone that nothing is being set in stone until the end of the session. What half-orc wizard? Of course her character has been a halfling barbarian the whole time. No idea who you’re talking about. You can even start with blanks on her character sheet and fill them in as you go (particularly for Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws).

I wouldn’t necessarily state it outright, but this is also a good way to trial run the game for her. If it turns out she doesn’t like it, you can always declare the session null and void. No harm, no foul.

The Players

The people attending can (should!) be the whole party. There is no point in keeping secrets from them, though there may be a point to keeping secrets from their characters. This can also be a nice break for your normal weekly game (but get buy in from those players first!). If your player isn’t comfortable with having everyone there, consider just one or two other players. I’d advise against one on one, because it can be very intimidating to new players to have the GM looking expectantly at you every few minutes while you draw a blank.

The other players, if any, can have some fun here as well. Let them try out one-off characters, whether as PCs or NPCs. This can be great fodder for bringing in new characters to your main story line. Note that their characters don’t even need to be in any kind of party or relationship with the main character. A chance encounter of the same-place-at-the-same-time variety is enough. Maybe they’re on the same side in a bar brawl, or got matched against each other in a tournament of some kind.

The Plan

The goal is to answer as many of the opening questions as possible. The tool to do that is to run a session. To ease the player into things, try running a combat and a non-combat encounter at each of levels one, three, and five or six. The idea is to give her the one to N leveling experience in a condensed form. This is helped by the fact that it’s her flashback session, so she should get half or more of the group’s focus, as opposed to the 1/5 she can expect in a normal five player session.

You can skip level one if you think the player is comfortable enough with the bare basics. Level three is recommended because that’s when most classes get their iconic and differentiating archetypes. Full casting classes also get second level spells, which is a good introduction to their resource management. Level five gets martial types an extra attack and casters third level spells. If the chosen class has a cool and exciting ability at level six, just go with it. That one level shouldn’t make a big difference in combat or anything, and if it helps her get a feel for the class, then why not?

After each level, ask a quick question or two on how she’s feeling about everything. If a the character made a big decision, or better yet had a strong instinctive reaction, take a look at the Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws. Remember, nothing in the character is set in stone yet, and it’s totally fine to take a half hour or so to roll up a new character.

When you’re done with the session, you can level up the character to be in line with the rest of the party. I’d suggest the lowest, but at your discretion you can put her at the average instead.

The DM

As mentioned above, this is a great way to answer a variety of questions about the character, like where that trinket or magic item came from, how they got a scar, or why they hate corn. It can also answer things like why they have a vendetta against Vile MacEvil-Visage or one of his henchmen.

Your job as DM is to have a good idea of how those encounters will work together to bring the character into an alliance with the party. Don’t just have a generic goblin encounter here when the party is fighting a lich in the future.

dnd 5e – What is the best way to help a new player join a high-level party?

First, consider what you’re trying to determine. Here are some suggestions:

  • Is the player comfortable with the game, DM, and other players, enough to enjoy playing?
  • Is the player comfortable with the basic rules?
  • Is the player comfortable with the character’s backstory?
  • Is the player comfortable with the character’s specific abilities?
  • What notable events in the character’s backstory inform their Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws?
  • What is the character’s place in the world?
  • What is the character’s place in the plot?
  • What parts of the world don’t the party usually see?

Fortunately, there’s a great way to determine all of the above.

I suggest running a session that focuses on two or three formative events from this character’s past.

The Rules

It should be clear to everyone that nothing is being set in stone until the end of the session. What half-orc wizard? Of course her character has been a halfling barbarian the whole time. No idea who you’re talking about. You can even start with blanks on her character sheet and fill them in as you go (particularly for Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws).

I wouldn’t necessarily state it outright, but this is also a good way to trial run the game for her. If it turns out she doesn’t like it, you can always declare the session null and void. No harm, no foul.

The Players

The people attending can (should!) be the whole party. There is no point in keeping secrets from them, though there may be a point to keeping secrets from their characters. This can also be a nice break for your normal weekly game (but get buy in from those players first!). If your player isn’t comfortable with having everyone there, consider just one or two other players. I’d advise against one on one, because it can be very intimidating to new players to have the GM looking expectantly at you every few minutes while you draw a blank.

The other players, if any, can have some fun here as well. Let them try out one-off characters, whether as PCs or NPCs. This can be great fodder for bringing in new characters to your main story line. Note that their characters don’t even need to be in any kind of party or relationship with the main character. A chance encounter of the same-place-at-the-same-time variety is enough. Maybe they’re on the same side in a bar brawl, or got matched against each other in a tournament of some kind.

The Plan

The goal is to answer as many of the opening questions as possible. The tool to do that is to run a session. To ease the player into things, try running a combat and a non-combat encounter at each of levels one, three, and five or six. The idea is to give her the one to N leveling experience in a condensed form. This is helped by the fact that it’s her flashback session, so she should get half or more of the group’s focus, as opposed to the 1/5 she can expect in a normal five player session.

You can skip level one if you think the player is comfortable enough with the bare basics. Level three is recommended because that’s when most classes get their iconic and differentiating archetypes. Full casting classes also get second level spells, which is a good introduction to their resource management. Level five gets martial types an extra attack and casters third level spells. If the chosen class has a cool and exciting ability at level six, just go with it. That one level shouldn’t make a big difference in combat or anything, and if it helps her get a feel for the class, then why not?

After each level, ask a quick question or two on how she’s feeling about everything. If a the character made a big decision, or better yet had a strong instinctive reaction, take a look at the Ideals, Bonds, and Flaws. Remember, nothing in the character is set in stone yet, and it’s totally fine to take a half hour or so to roll up a new character.

When you’re done with the session, you can level up the character to be in line with the rest of the party. I’d suggest the lowest, but at your discretion you can put her at the average instead.

The DM

As mentioned above, this is a great way to answer a variety of questions about the character, like where that trinket or magic item came from, how they got a scar, or why they hate corn. It can also answer things like why they have a vendetta against Vile MacEvil-Visage or one of his henchmen.

Your job as DM is to have a good idea of how those encounters will work together to bring the character into an alliance with the party. Don’t just have a generic goblin encounter here when the party is fighting a lich in the future.

dnd 5e – What is the best way to help a new player join a higher level party?

The breadth of choice during character creation and combat is usually the thing that overwhelms new players the most. I will give you a couple of ways I have simplified these options for new players I have played with. But first a disclaimer for your specific situation.

Does this player actually need help?

It’s great that you are proactively searching for a solution to a potential problem, that’s the sign of a good DM. However you have said the player has played a few ones shots, “gets the game and has been reading the rules”. To me that sounds like someone who might be capable of taking on an 8-10th level character without too many issues.

If you help them through the character creation process and maybe be a little lenient on them knowing the rules for the first few sessions, you may find you are worried over nothing. It’s best to check in with the player and see what level of help they feel they might need.

Simpler Character Creation

5th edition has done a good job of reducing the number of choices players need to make during character creation, it is one of the reasons the game is so popular with new players. Therefore I have found this to be much less of an issue than with a game like Pathfinder 1e.

There is a lot of good advice on helping players with character creation on this site and I won’t repeat it all here. It is worth reading the following questions for ideas:

My major advice for helping new players create characters is to let them changes their minds later. Inexperienced players have no way of knowing if a certain cool sounding ability is actually good or not. So I take the pressure off by letting them changes out choices later on once they learn more about the game and their character.

For my first time party I actually let them all completely re-stat their characters after reaching level 4 as many had use point-buy poorly and weren’t enjoying the way their characters worked. The players all loved this as it let them be the character they actually wanted to be rather than the one they thought they wanted to be before playing.

Simpler During Play

Many classes and characters have a huge variety of tools at their disposal during gameplay. The options can often paralyze new players as they struggle to choose what to do. I have successfully used a few tactics to help my players overcome this.

  1. List their options. If a new player is stuck in the “I don’t know what to do” phase, you can help by quickly giving them a short (2-4 item) list of options their character would be capable of doing. Sometime new players simply can’t think of what the options are so by laying them out like this you allow them to choose the best one for their circumstance.
  2. Spellcasting Loadouts. Usually the most likely classes to overwhelm new players are spellcasters. Choosing their spells for the day from an enormous list is complicated and confusing. The best solution for them is to help them create “spell loadouts”. A preset list of spells for a certain situation. You might create 3 loadouts, one for exploring, one for combat, and one for in town/social encounters. Doing so reduces the players options from 10+ choices of spells across varying levels to just a choice between 3 loadouts for that particular day.
  3. Identify a good default action. One thing I have done with my players is try to work out a decent default action to take in combat. If they are confused or unsure they just do that and it will always be a decent action to take. For example I have a Bard who used to struggle with options in combat, I gave her a magical crossbow and now her default action is “shoot crossbow, use bardic inspiration”.

Specific options and recommendations will vary based on the class they choose and the person playing it. Different players struggle in different situations and it can be good to come back and ask us for specific advice if they are encountering a particular issue.

A More Drastic Solution

The advice I have given above assumes you want to stick with the standard rules for your player, which would be my normal suggestion. However, if you have a player you think will really struggle, or a group of entirely new players I have another option.

My friend and I developed a set of homebrew/house-rules to create simplified characters that are as easy to play as first level characters but won’t get squished trying to play at higher levels. We call it “signature abilities”.

You give them the hitpoints, ability scores proficiency bonuses and appropriate equipment for the level you want them to be. Straight statistical bonuses are easy for new players to understand. There is no real difference between adding +3 and +8 other than you are more likely to hit, which is good.

Then, instead of giving them their full set of class abilities you choose a few that are the core features of their class. For fighter’s we granted Action Surge and Extra Attack, Bards we gave Bardic Inspiration and Vicious Mockery. Clerics and Wizards we gave a short list of spells 4-5 signature spells and a number of spell slot but dropped the spell level part to simplify the mechanics.

The goal is to give the feel of the class and let them do some cool things without being bogged down by the mechanics. This system has been a storming success. We developed it to run a one shot for 20+ players for a birthday party and we have used it multiple times since to introduce new players to the game.

As your player becomes more confident you can introduce more rules and mechanics back into their character. Eventually becoming a full character once they are ready. This system can slightly upset the power dynamics but it is focused on getting new players enjoying the game as quickly as possible. Which to me is really the goal.

mysql – getting last entry with ORDER BY with inner join not working

I just realized that this statement is no longer getting the last entry from attributes. I was working before I believe I had added the inner join. But adding this inner join I no longer get the last id entered from the attributes table.

SELECT attributes.*, attribute_entries.id AS attr_ent_id FROM attributes INNER JOIN attribute_entries on attribute_entries.FK_attribute_id = attributes.id ORDER BY attributes.id DESC LIMIT 1

Why wouldn’t this working anymore?