dnd 5e – Question about Teleport Ability of Monsters

dnd 5e – Question about Teleport Ability of Monsters – Role-playing Games Stack Exchange

monsters – Did gnolls reproduce differently in previous editions?

Per the AD&D 1e MM, they were like other humanoids1

While Original D&D didn’t go into this kind of detail (and thus the question’s answer is mu for that edition) the AD&D 1e MM treated them the same way as most giant class creatures (which was most of the humanoids plus ogres, ettins, trolls, and giants2).

In the second paragraph of the MM entry on gnolls, we find:

The lair will also contain females and young equal to 50% and 200%
respectively of the number of males present (MM, p. 46)

See this similar entry for goblins

… females and young equal to 60% and 100% respectively of the number of male goblins encountered (MM, p. 47)

And this entry for orcs

… females equal 50% of the number of males, young equal to 100% of
the number of males (MM, p. 76)

Entries for bugbears, hobgoblins and ogres are similar. In that respect, when the game first treated them as more than an entry on the monster’s appearing table (Original D&D) they were certainly what D&D 5e would class as a humanoid like a hobgoblin or an orc, with their lair being populated by mates and young in varying proportions to the male population.

From the above we can infer, with confidence, that they reproduced like other humanoid creatures for that edition.

Yeenoghu was a demon, stats as a monster

It is worth noting that the first exposition on the gnoll deity Yeenoghu he was a “demon lord” in the MM; as a deity, he arrives in a book published three years after the MM, Deities and Demigods but they didn’t go into much detail in that entry, basically telling the DM “see the MM”.

I’ll compare that treatment to AD&D 2e’s MM when I am where I can access it. May be a day or two. Somewhere along the line, their connection with hyenas (which is alluded to in the AD&D 1e MM) was expanded upon.

From the 3.5 SRD, they are certainly painted as something a lot different from the other humanoids:

A gnoll is a nocturnal carnivore, preferring intelligent creatures
for food because they scream more.

As I no longer have my 3.5 MM, I’ll just leave that there as a pointer to differentiating them from the goblins, orcs, and hobgoblins who are a lot more like humans that gnolls were.


1 In 1e ‘humanoid’ applied to orcs, bugbears, gnolls, goblins, etc and ‘demi human’ applied to halflings, elves, gnomes, dwarves, etc).
2Giant class creatured, per PHB p. 24 (Ranger description) were bugbears, ettins, giants, gnolls, goblins, hobgoblins, kobolds, ogres, ogre magi, orcs and trolls. The ranger had bonus to damage against these kinds of creatures, an early version of ‘favored enemy’ of 5th edition).

dnd 4e – What’s the order of operations when multiple game elements check that a monster’s dropped to 0 hp?

I’m considering for my PC the epic destiny Keeper of the Everflow, in part, because of the level 30 epic destiny feature turning the wheel that, among others, grants the following ability:

When you reduce an enemy to 0 hit points, you can choose to have that enemy reincarnated in the world as a natural creature with no memory of its past life. You have no control over where and how the enemy reincarnates. (Heroes of Shadow 154)

The reason that I want this ability is that I hate game elements like this iron golem juggernaut power:

Toxic Death (when first bloodied and again when the iron golem juggernaut drops to 0 hit points) ✦ Poison
Close burst 5; +31 vs. Fortitude; 3d10 + 6 poison damage, and ongoing 10 poison damage (save ends). (Monster Manual 2 135)

I’m kind of sick of monsters that I already killed still trying to kill me, and stopping them from doing that will make me happy, even if it’s only for a few encounters. However, before I take this destiny, I want to make sure of something: Do the rules offer an order of operations for how game elements like the two game elements above interact?

For example, when I reduce the golem’s hp to 0 does the golem’s toxic death power activate then my turning the wheel ability kicks in? Or does the turning the wheel ability essentially negate the toxic death power because when I reduced the golem to 0 hp it was immediately “reincarnated in the world as a natural creature with no memory of its past life” therefore the golem’s now a giraffe, platypus, or axolotl that (presumably) can’t explode into a cloud of poisonous gas?


Note: I know that Keeper of the Everflow isn’t a great epic destiny for my battlemind, but my 2 years of weekly D&D 4e gaming leads me to believe that the game is awfully forgiving of players making for their characters merely average choices, and the Keeper destiny is at least an average battlemind choice according to this guide, the most comprehensive battlemind guide I can find. However, that guide refers to the turning the wheel feature as a “flavour-only capstone,” and I’m not sure if that’s because the guide’s author just never fought exploding dead monsters (so it sounded like “flavour-only” to the author) or because the rules say somewhere that monsters first explode (or whatever) then reincarnate (or whatever). By the way, if there’re alternatives to this level 30 epic destiny class feature that my human battlemind can take that’ll prevent dead monster explosions at a lower level or with a lower resource cost, answers are free to point those out.

dnd 5e – Which CR 5-13 monsters can I use against an all-flying party?

If I run a 5e game for a crow-man party who naturally have all-day flight as part of their basic movement modes, which existing published monsters / encounter types am I left with who have either flight or ranged abilities that are equally dangerous as their melee abilities?

Basically, can I cobble together encounters out of the existing flyers/traps/social/archers for those levels (5-13) or am I going to need to get creative and modify/create new monsters and encounters to fight this party?

In other words,1 are there a significant number of enemies in dnd 5e that can present a credible challenge despite not having flight, if facing a flying party? There are all manner of spellcasters and the like who can in the edition I’m most familiar with, but I’m uncertain about 5e, especially at the levels I’m referring to.

There were about ten ways to find enemies fitting specific criteria in 3.5e (searchable monster databases with definable keys, lists people made etc). I don’t know enough about 5e resources to find such means myself, but I’m assuming here they exist – and that people familiar with them will help me (and presumably, other people) avoid having to go and count things by hand ourselves.

I first looked through the bestiary by hand and was like, wait, surely, there’s a better way. Then I found a bunch of broken searchable monster 5e databases, and a forum thread arguing about aarokocra. At that point I decided not to reinvent the wheel.


1 Text from this point onwards collated from comments from original querent for context. Comments have seen minor revisions for the sake of clarity

dnd 5e – Roughly what percentage of CR 5-13 monsters am I excluding by taking an all-flying party?

If I run a game of 5e for a crow-man party who naturally have all-day flight as part of their basic movement modes, what % of the existing published monsters / encounter types am I left with who have either flight or an innate ranged capability commensurate with their melee capability? Basically, can I cobble together encounters out of the existing flyers/traps/social/archers for those levels (5-13) or am I going to need to get creative and modify/create new monsters and encounters to fight this party?

monsters – Are Griffin’s red or white meat

monsters – Are Griffin’s red or white meat – Role-playing Games Stack Exchange

monsters – Can Guenhwyvar communicate?

I realize this is a lore question, but I’ll try to answer with some rules (since I could not find anything based on lore):

According to the Forgotten Realms wikia:

Guenhwyvar was summoned through a detailed onyx figurine of a panther.(7) When summoned, the figurine emitted a gray mist which quickly solidified into the panther shape.(6) Guenhwyvar herself was described as a “huge black panther.”(8)

Indeed, it looks like she is a figurine from the same wiki:

Guenhwyvar is a unique figurine in that the statuette summons its creature rather than transforms into it. This could be due to the strange circumstances of its creation and the uniqueness of the beast, a particularly intelligent and powerful panther. She can be summoned by calling her name to the black onyx figurine, for up to twelve hours of every 48-hour period.

So she is a unique figurine of wondrous power.

In 5e, a “Figurine of Wondrous Power” states:

The creature is friendly to you and your companions. It understands your languages and obeys your spoken commands. If you issue no commands, the creature defends itself but takes no other actions.

This item in 3.5e:

The creature obeys and serves its owner. Unless stated otherwise, the creature understands Common but does not speak.

But as was pointed out in the comments, these books are older. The first was published shortly before the release of 2e.
A gnat figurine from 2e:

The gnat is telepathic …

The Panther looks to have been modeled after the onyx dog, based on the 1988 publication date of the first novel (The Crystal Shard)

Onyx Dog: When commanded, this statuette changes into a creature which
has the same properties as a war dog, except that it is endowed with
intelligence of 8-10, can communicate in the common tongue, and has
exceptional olfactory and visual abilities. (AD&D 1e, DMG p. 144)

Based on rules, it could have been possible, but as you can see from the other answer, the answer is no.

monsters – Are there any official references to the “a cat is a deadly encounter for a commoner” meme?

I have encountered several times the claim that cats are rather deadly encounters for any commoner and the difference between a commoner and an adventurer is, that the adventurer actually would have a fighting chance to survive a one on one encounter with a cat. That does not seem to hold true for a lvl 1 wizard, so wizards elongate their lives by petting cats instead of trying to kill them. Evil Hat claims that bags full of cats were Mage-killer weapons due to statistics for a long time – but apparently 5E seems to fix that – but yet again, that thread mentions, that cats are or used to be utter commoner-killers since at least AD&D 2nd Edition (or older). The Commoner-killing properties of cats even found their way into Order of the Stick and got it mentioned on TVtropes Cats are Mean under Tabletop, pointing to 3.5 as the source.

Is there an official source, like a Dragon magazine article or a blog post, that references this joke/story/meme? In case of multiple finds, the oldest official source wins.

dnd 3.5e – Alter Size Salient Divine Ability referring to Improving Monsters Size Increases?

The Alter Size Salient Divine Ability states

As a free action, the deity can assume any size from Fine to Colossal. The deity also can change the size of up to 100 pounds of objects it touches. If the deity has a familiar, personal mount, or personal intelligent weapon, the creature can change size with the deity if the deity touches it, but its weight counts against the deity’s weight limit. This is a supernatural ability.

Notes
This ability allows the deity to assume any proportions from the size of a grain of sand up or as much as 1,600 feet tall. A radical change in size can have great impact on the deity’s combat ability. The deity’s Strength, Armor Class, attack bonus, and damage dealt with weapons changes according to the size the deity assumes. The deity’s Strength score can never be reduced to less than 1 through this ability. Also note that use of this divine ability does not affect all the deities’ characteristics.

https://www.d20srd.org/srd/divine/divineAbilitiesFeats.htm#alterSize

Do the adjustments mentioned refer to the size adjustments for improving monsters table?

https://www.d20srd.org/srd/improvingMonsters.htm#sizeIncreases

The text of Alter Size states ‘The deity’s Strength, Armor Class, attack bonus, and damage dealt with weapons changes according to the size the deity assumes.‘ and ‘Also note that use of this divine ability does not affect all the deities’ characteristics.

So referring to the size increase table is it correct to assume the only adjustments made when considering that table are taken from the Strength column and AC / Attack column AND NOT any adjustment from the Dex, Con, Natural Armor columns?

The reason I ask is I’m currently in the process of 3.5-ising Nyarlathotep from CoC D20 and need to get it correct as an epic threat for my players.

dnd 5e – Should players know the name of monsters when they are encountered?

dnd 5e – Should players know the name of monsters when they are encountered? – Role-playing Games Stack Exchange

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