Are there official or unofficial rules for drugs and addiction in Call of Cthulhu?

I’m playing the 7ed version of Masks of Nyalethotep(sp?). I decided to have my character a laudanum user as he’s an opium addict, because I was certain there were rules about narcotics and drug addiction in Call of Cthulhu.

But now I can’t find any in the main rulebooks (I have 5th to 7th edition), investigator and keeper handbooks, or other sourcebooks and campaigns I have.

Are there any official or unofficial rules for PCs using narcotics and for addiction?

If there are, which book are they in?

At the last session, myself and the GM decided to give my PC a penalty dice on skill and characteristic rules and movement, and to reduce the effects of Sanity rolls (sometimes he won’t make them, if he does the sanity costs might be reduced), when he’s under the influence of laudanum.

UPDATE: The rules don’t have be official or for 7E (I’ll convert or adapt rules from earlier editions).

dnd 5e – Did the UA “revised” Beastmaster Ranger make it into any official source book?

The “Ranger, Revised” was never fully incorporated. It remains one of the few UA articles that I see as having real value, and which I use in my world.

It usefully revised the PHB ranger archetypes of Hunter and Beast Master, plus added a new one of Deep Stalker.

Later books added several new archetypes, which were better designed and fixed many of the original problems. The Gloom Stalker in the Xanathar’s Guide is similar to the Deep Stalker in the UA article, but better designed.

So, in my world, if you choose to be a Ranger, you need to have some idea of what archetype you’re going to pick at 3rd level. If you’re going to pick Hunter or Beast Master, I’ll let you use the “Ranger, Revised” template. If you’re going to pick any of the others, you’ll use the standard Ranger template.

dnd 5e – Where can I find information about the characters named in official D&D 5e books?

There is some information in their respective books, but it’s not much, I’m afraid.

Introduction in Tasha’s Cauldron to Everything:

Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything offers a host of new options for DUNGEONS & DRAGONS, and our journey through those options is accompanied by the notes of the wizard Tasha. Creator of the spell Tasha’s hideous laughter, Tasha’s life is one of the most storied in the D&D multiverse. Raised by Baba Yaga, the Mother of Witches herself, Tasha adventured across the world of Greyhawk and became the friend and sometimes enemy of other famous adventurers, like Mordenkainen. In time, she ruled as the Witch Queen and later changed her name to Iggwilv – a
figure of legend who is whispered about, feared, and admired.

There are also notes from Tasha spread among the book, from which we learn that her aliases are Natasha the Dark, Hura of Ket, Baba Yaga’s Daughter or witch by excellence, and that she loves insects, for example.

Introduction in Xanathar’s Guide To Everything

Beneath the bustling city of Waterdeep, a beholder crime lord keeps tabs on everyone and everything—or so the beholder thinks. Known as Xanathar, this bizarre being believes it can gather information on everything in the DUNGEONS & DRAGONS multiverse. The beholder desires to know it all! But no matter what the beholder learns and what treasures it acquires, its most prized possession in all the multiverse remains its goldfish, Sylgar.

Again, we can learn some things from his notes throughout the book, like he’s glad to live underground because there is no weather, or that he’s not sure whether he likes music or not.

No short introduction here, but we can learn some things from the notes at the beginning of the book:

Mordenkainen is an Oeridian wizard from the world of Greyhawk who travelled the multiverse with his apprentice Bigby to observe conflicts of all sorts.

Sprinkled throughout the book are observations and musings from two denizens of the Forgotten Realms: the legendary explorer Volothamp Geddarm (Volo to his friends) and the Archmage of Shadowdale himself, Elminster Aumar.

Here again, some notes throughout the book give hints about the personality of Volo.

security – How do I identify an airport’s official free Wi-Fi network?

Non-paranoid solution: Ask an airport employee or check the airport’s website.

Summary: While it’s a good idea to be mindful about network security, joining the “official” WiFi network doesn’t make your connection any more secure. Instead, use a VPN or stick to fully encrypted services, such as HTTPS websites. For more details, see the rest of the answer below.


If the network is open access and doesn’t require a key to join, then all packets are unencrypted and absolutely anyone can sniff out everyone else’s traffic. If there’s a key, things are a bit more difficult, but likewise not secure. To quote an excellent answer from SuperUser.SE:

With WEP encryption, it’s super simple. Everything’s encrypted with the key you needed to know to get on the network. Everyone on the network can decode everyone else’s traffic without even trying.

With WPA-PSK and WPA2-PSK, it’s a little trickier, but not too hard. WPA-PSK and WPA2-PSK encrypt everything with per-client, per-session keys, but those keys are derived from the Pre-Shared Key (the PSK; the key you have to know to get on the network) plus some information exchanged in the clear when the client joins or re-joins the network. So if you know the PSK for the network, and your sniffer catches the “4-way handshake” another client does with the AP as it joins, you can decrypt all of that client’s traffic. If you didn’t happen to capture that client’s 4-way handshake, you can send a spoofed de-authenticate packet to the target client (spoofing it to make it look like it came from the AP’s MAC address), forcing the client to fall off the network and get back on, so you can capture its 4-way handshake this time, and decrypt all further traffic to/from that client. The user of the machine receiving the spoofed de-auth probably won’t even notice that his laptop was off the network for a split second.

There is also an issue with the recently discovered KRACK attack, which makes it possible to decrypt traffic on unpatched clients even if you don’t know the network’s password. However, it’s not too relevant for public WiFi, as everyone in the area knows the pre-shared key.
If we go beyond simple traffic capturing there are various MITM attacks including ARP cache poisoning, DNS spoofing, HTTP session hijacking, fake captive portals, etc. Some of them are possible even without running a rogue access point. And if someone does run a fake AP they might as well use the official SSID to stay undetected.

The only way to be truly protected is to use a VPN whenever you are joining an untrusted network or at least use websites with SSL to avoid someone sniffing out your private data. Using a VPN can also have the benefit of making sure you’re always seeing the Internet as if you’re browsing from home, rather than facing arbitrary censorship and regional restrictions on online content.

Are there official rules for drugs and addiction in Call of Cthulhu?

I’m playing the 7ed version of Masks of Nyalethotep(sp?). I decided to have my character a laudanum user as he’s an opium addict, because I was certain there were rules about narcotics and drug addiction in Call of Cthulhu.

But now I can’t find any in the main rulebooks (I have 5th to 7th edition), investigator and keeper handbooks, or other sourcebooks and campaigns I have.

Are there any official rules for PCs using narcotics and for addiction?

If there are, which book are they in?

At the last session, myself and the GM decided to give my PC a penalty dice on skill and characteristic rules and movement, and to reduce the effects of Sanity rolls (sometimes he won’t make them, if he does the sanity costs might be reduced), when he’s under the influence of laudanum

adb – “Official” vs “Unofficial” custom ROM from the XDA forums?

I have a Lenovo Vibe K5 Plus(a6020a46 3GB RAM variant) which I’d like to root and install a custom ROM on.

On the XDA forum dedicated to custom ROMS for this device there is a plethora of options including some marked “Official” and some “Unofficial”.

Should I choose the “Unofficial” build of ‘LineageOS’, which as I understand is the most popular ROM, so maybe it will have the best community support? Other popular “Unofficial” builds include ‘Pixel Experience’ and ‘Orange Fox.’

Or should I choose one of the “Official” build like that of ‘Arrow OS’ though it is not that popular?

Will a more popular but “Unofficial” ROM provide better community and hardware support or will an “Official” ROM build be better in terms of support and stability?

A related thread I found on XDA forums talks about the differences in Official and Unofficial ROMs but it is for the same ROM(eg: diferent versions of Paranoid Android). Also the the thread does not address the issue that I have asked about.

I am still quite new to all things Android so please give your valuable suggestions on how I can improve my knowledge and questions posted here.

blockchain – What is the official explorer and value API for Bitcoin?

I am new to cryptocurrency development, and I have noticed that Bitcoin has an official wallet for both Desktop and Mobile (correct me if I am wrong).

My question is, does Bitcoin have an official explorer and value API (such as Bitcoin to fiat conversion) too? If not, are there services or APIs for developers that are recommended and widely used?

Official website for bitcoin – Bitcoin Stack Exchange

What is the official website for bitcoin?

Bitcoin isn’t a lawful entity but a collection of interoperable stuff.

Bitcoin.org is registered by the creator of Bitcoin and currently managed by those who maintain Bitcoin Core, the node implementation that is considered to be the “reference” one. Hence I suggest using Bitcoin.org

Bitcoin.com is owned by Roger Ver, who is interested in promoting Bitcoin Cash as Bitcoin. The website is supported by Bitcoin Cash fans and hated by Bitcoin users. (Citation needed?) You just need to be careful, what they have on their website Bitcoin Cash will not be applicable to Bitcoin. It might happen that “your transaction can’t be found” because you’re on their Bitcoin Cash explorer. When you’re sure that you chose the correct coin, there is no downsides of using it.

✅OFFICIAL – Trafee.com – Smartlinks of new generation | NewProxyLists

Trafee.com – smartlink of new generation!

We present Trafee.com – one of the top affiliate networks with innovative traffic monetization. Absolutely automatic smartlink system, without a million managers, maximum profit from your clicks!

  • We work as a partner company till the 2017 year
  • We work World Wide with effective landing pages
  • We have 4 active vertical for this moment (adult dating, gay dating, adult games, cams)
  • We cooperate with the direct advertisers and add best offers every day
  • We pay weekly without hold , minimal payment amount is 100$
  • We have a great support team who help you with activation and answer for all questions

AND In our network we have smartlink and it works automatically. Smartlink find offer individually based on your traffic volume and quality

We invite you to join us and start earning here
Contact your personal affiliate manager after registration! We wish you good results!

topnetwork.jpg

Is there any downside in purchasing high-speed train tickets in China via the official website, instead of third-party agencies?

I read that high-speed train tickets in China might be purchased online either via the official website or third-party agency such as chinahighlights.com or china-diy-travel.com. Is there any downside in purchasing high-speed train tickets in China via the official website, instead of third-party agencies? I wonder whether purchasing via the official website is always preferable or going through some third-party agency has some upside (e.g., price, ticket availability, etc.).