dnd 5e – Can a trickery cleric’s illusory duplicate make opportunity attacks if the cleric has the War Caster feat?

The cleric’s Trickery Domain subclass has the Channel Divinity feature “Invoke Duplicity” which creates an illusory duplicate of the cleric and provides the following abilities:

For the duration, you can cast spells as though you were in the illusion’s space, but you must use your own senses. Additionally, when both you and your illusion are within 5 feet of a creature that can see the illusion, you have advantage on attack rolls against that creature, given how distracting the illusion is to the target. (PHB, pg. 63)

Can this duplicate make opportunity attacks? Or, more precisely, can the cleric make opportunity attacks through their duplicate?

If the cleric has the War Caster feat, they are able to use certain spells as opportunity attack “replacements”:

When a hostile creature’s movement provokes an opportunity attack from you, you can use your reaction to cast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack. The spell must have a casting time of 1 action and must target only that creature. (PHB, pg. 170)

This would be necessary for allowing opportunity attacks via the duplicate because the cleric can only cast spells through them, not make weapon attacks there. (Spells with 1-action or 1-bonus-action casting times cannot be used as opportunity attacks, as discussed by Sage Advice here.)

So I think this comes down to a question of reach. Does the illusory duplicate extend the cleric’s reach to include the 5 feet around the duplicate because the duplicate allows the cleric to cast spells “as though (they) were in the illusion’s space”? They are allowed to make melee spell attacks within 5 feet of the duplicate, after all. Or is the cleric’s reach limited to the 5 feet around them, personally?

dnd 5e – Can a trickery cleric’s illusory duplicate make opportunity attacks?


There are two requirements that must be met for opportunity attacks.

According to the Player’s Handbook:

In a fight, everyone is constantly watching for enemies to drop their guard. You can rarely move heedlessly past your foes without putting yourself in danger; doing so provokes an opportunity attack.

You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. To make the opportunity attack, you use your reaction to make one melee attack against the provoking creature. (PHB, pg. 195)

So, assuming you have a reaction available, to be able to make an opportunity attack, 1) a hostile creature must move out of your reach, and 2) you must be able to make a melee attack.


Melee attacks can be made via the duplicate, but there are complexities to keep in mind.

The duplicate doesn’t make weapon attacks, but the cleric can cast spells through it
(as described in the text quoted in the question). Because clerics have access to melee spell attacks (e.g. from Inflict Wounds), they are able to make melee attacks through the duplicate.

Bonus Action Spells and Reactions on Your Turn

In the rare case of using a reaction during your turn (as opposed to on someone else’s turn in a round), there is a limitation to be aware of:

A spell cast with a bonus action is especially swift. You must use a bonus action on your turn to cast the spell, provided that you haven’t already taken a bonus action this turn. You can’t cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action. (PHB, pg. 202)

Therefore, once you cast a bonus action spell on your turn, you may then only cast a 1-action cantrip for any spell-based opportunity attack that later happens during that turn.

Unfortunately, clerics do not (as of yet) get access to any cantrips that are melee spell attacks, so a cleric with no cantrips from other sources (such as multiclassing or the Magic Initiate feat) has no ability to make spell-based opportunity attacks during their turn if they have already cast a bonus action spell.

The War Caster Feat

The limitation to melee attacks becomes irrelevant if the cleric has the War Caster feat. With it, certain spells that are not melee attacks may be used in place of a standard opportunity attack:

When a hostile creature’s movement provokes an opportunity attack from you, you can use your reaction to cast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack. The spell must have a casting time of 1 action and must target only that creature. (PHB, pg. 170)

Although this replaces an opportunity attack rather than altering it, that difference is largely semantic.

The Bottom Line

The cleric is capable of casting spells through their duplicate that would be eligible to be used as opportunity attacks.


The interpretation of reach is critical.

Having confirmed that the cleric can make eligible attacks through the duplicate, we’re left with the question of reach.

Reach is described as follows:

Most creatures have a 5-foot reach and can thus attack targets within 5 feet of them when making a melee attack. Certain creatures (typically those larger than Medium) have melee attacks with a greater reach than 5 feet, as noted in their descriptions. (PHB, pg. 195)

I see two possible interpretations of reach regarding the duplicate:

  1. Extended Reach – Because the illusory duplicate allows the cleric to cast spells “as though (they) were in the illusion’s space,” that duplicate expands the cleric’s reach to also include the five feet around it. This is no different than how wielding a glaive expands a character’s reach from 5 feet to 10 feet. As such, a creature leaving the “reach of the duplicate” (which is actually the extended reach of the cleric) would trigger an opportunity attack.

  2. Personal Reach – The description of opportunity attacks mentions that they’re caused by “everyone constantly watching for enemies to drop their guard.” However, the illusory duplicate is unable to watch for anything, and the cleric doesn’t perceive anything from the duplicate’s perspective. Instead, the cleric must “use (their) own senses.” Because the cleric doesn’t have the same personal awareness of the space around their duplicate that they do of the space around their own physical body, an enemy moving out of what would be the duplicate’s reach cannot trigger an opportunity attack from the more distant cleric.

Each DM will have to decide which interpretation they prefer.

dnd 5e – When casting Infestation as an opportunity attack with the War Caster feat, how does the forced movement affect the targets turn?

With the War Caster feat, you are allowed to cast a spell as a reaction when a target provokes an opportunity attack. The infestation cantrip states that the creature

moves 5 feet in a random direction if it can move and its speed is at
least 5 feet.

Does that creature then end its turn, or does the creature simply move 5 in a random direction and then continues its turn as normal?

The description also states:

if the direction rolled is blocked, the target doesn’t move.

Does this mean that in this specific scenario the target loses its movement, or is it simply referring to the 5 feet forced by the spell itself?

dnd 5e – Does a Boggle using Dimensional Rift to attack provoke an Opportunity Attack?

No opportunity attack happens.

I agree with the rules interpretation of this answer. An opportunity attack occurs “…when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach.” The Boggle’s withdrawal after an attack does not involve moving out of the target’s reach, so no opportunity attack is made on that basis.

Nor is this simply a technicality.

I disagree with the other answer that this is merely a technicality and that opportunity attacks could be allowed for this use of dimensional rift.

First, I observe that an opportunity attack is not just about moving out of reach. That is a necessary but not sufficient condition. The creature moving also must do so without taking the Disengage action, and without having any other feature that would limit or eliminate opportunity attacks against them (e.g. Barbarian’s third-level Eagle Spirit totem, which imposes disadvantage to opportunity attacks against the Barbarian).

There are clearly a number of specifics in the rules that offset the “moving out of reach” aspect that would normally allow an opportunity attack.

Second, it is not a logical inconsistency that an opportunity attack depends on moving out of reach but must take place before the creature is actually out of reach.

Indeed, the presence of the Disengage action makes more clear why an opportunity attack happens. It is not the movement itself, but the nature of the movement. I.e. to move away from a hostile creature in an unguarded way. The entire movement is done in an unguarded way and thus invites the opportunity attack.

The risk to the moving creature is present as soon as they try to move, thus the attack can occur before they actually move away.

The action economy is used to balance this risk, by allowing a creature to spend an action to eliminate it. Narratively, this movement is done more carefully, in a way that prevents the opportunity attack. It doesn’t mean there’s an inconsistency between the rules and the narrative movement.

Likewise, it’s easy to see that the Boggle is not really moving away per se, and does not have the unguarded aspect of their movement. They are no more moving away than a fighter is moving away after they attack with a sword when they bring their sword back close to their body. Even taking into account that the Boggle ultimately winds up inaccessible by the target of their attack, there’s no inconsistency in disallowing an opportunity attack on the Boggle as they finish their attack and move back to the other side of the rift.

See also e.g. Boggle Tactics for another unofficial interpretation along these lines:

A boggle may open a Dimensional Rift (bonus action) that allows it to reach a victim and pummel him or her through the rift (Attack action), then run away (movement). It can do so without incurring an opportunity attack, because the target can’t attack back through the rift!

Franchise business opportunity

Things You Need To Look When Consider a Franchise Business

Franchises are one of the most successful businesses in the world. Buying a franchise provides a greater chance of success in the market and it’s also an incredible way to become a business proprietor.

Before buying a franchise, you need to understand a lot about the respective industry & market. You can also be getting help from a franchise consultant, who can give you the best fit options according to your requirements & needs.

Here in this article, let’s discuss about the factors you should look at when considering a franchise:

Get To Know Yourself and Values

Before deciding on any franchise opportunity, you need to know your values apart from investing the money. A Franchise is not just only making an investment. Ask yourself the following questions before taken into decision:
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  • What do you really want out of the franchise business?
  • What kind of lifestyle do you want?
  • What’s your level of risk appetite?
  • What kind of skills do you have?

Company Culture

In simple, company culture is a set of shared values, goals, practices, and attitudes that characterize an organization. Franchising was discovered to create a strategic advantage over others. The company culture plays a significant role in the profitability of the business. Choose the enthusiastic franchise brand, who can well-assist & support to run the business operations.

Brand Selection

Especially in a franchise business, brand image is very important that is to help establish a reputation in the market. Brand selection is directly reflected in the business, both in terms of image and long-term value.

Proven Track Record

For successful franchise has to be a proven concept and track record in their business performance. Choose a franchise that holds a broader market and several open locations that will show positive growth of business in different markets.

Profitability

Whether you’re profitable or not, a franchisor will collect some percentage of gross sales. Most brands generate revenue by accumulating the percentage of sales from each franchise. Therefore, selecting franchisor should be more focused on helping you sell to customers than selling to you.

Possible For Expansion

The real growth of franchising is occurred in running the business in multiple locations and territories. The true nature of profit in the franchise business only comes about when brands have room for expansion. Many brands allow you to purchase development rights, sanctioning to open multiple locations within concord time-frame.

Before you decide, start your search within yourself first then gone down the above-mentioned checklists. Be clear about what you want and important in your lifestyle & business. Better consult with experts alongside follow your intuition as well and choose wisely for your successful franchise business.

 

dnd 5e – For the Swarmkeeper ranger’s Gathered Swarm feature, does being moved by the swarm provoke opportunity attacks?

No, it doesn’t

The rules for opportunity attacks state the following (emphasis mine):

You don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

Gathered Swarm clearly states that the swarm moves you. Furthermore, this movement does not use your action (as it is a rider effect on an attack), and it doesn’t use your own movement. Therefore, you do not provoke an opportunity attack.

dnd 5e – Does the Swarmkeeper’s Gathered Swarm movement option provoke opportunity attacks?

No

The rules for Opportunity Attacks state the following (emphasis mine) :

You don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

Gathered Swarm clearly states that the swarm moves you. Furthermore, the movement does not use your action (as it is a rider effect on an attack) and it doesn’t use your movement. Therefore, you do not provoke an attack of opportunity.

dnd 5e – When are Opportunity Attacks provoked while holding a reach and a non-reach weapon?

What I find unclearly defined in the rules is how long the benefit to reach lasts when using a weapon with reach.

Consider again the text:

Reach. This weapon adds 5 feet to your reach when you attack with it.

Emphasis added.

Clearly we cannot believe that every time you swing a whip your reach increases, first to 10, then to 15, then to 20 and so on. This is obviously not the intended interpretation.

So, how long does the benefit to reach last? Your attack? Your turn? The entire round? Until your next turn? This much seems to be unclear when working strictly within RAW.

An overly-restrictive interpretation would be that when your opponent triggers the opportunity attack, you are not currently attacking with any weapon at all. In that case, your reach is 5 feet. If you take this interpretation, then opportunity the opportunity attack only occurs if the opponent moves out of your 5 foot reach.

How we interpret the RAW verbiage in our campaign:

An alternative interpretation that I consider worth some merit requires an imaginative interpretation of “when you attack.” It is this: whichever weapon you use for the attack action should also be the weapon with which you make opportunity attacks.

Using this interpretation, even if fighting two-handed, it is unambiguous which weapon is used to perform opportunity attacks, and therefore unambiguous what your reach is for opportunity attacks. If two weapon fighting, you would use the same weapon used for your primary attack action, not the weapon used for your bonus action. In the whip/dagger combination, which is not compatible with two weapon fighting, you would use the weapon most recently used to attack.

Specifically addressing the whip/dagger situation, it is already understood that because a whip is not light, a character cannot use a bonus action to enable attacking with both weapons in a round. While not explicitly stated in RAW, I consider it a reasonable extension that a reaction also does not enable attacking with the second weapon.

dnd 5e – Does this lake event in the “Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden” adventure allow a grapple as an opportunity attack?

There is an event in Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden (an official D&D 5e adventure by Wizards of the Coast) that seems to allow for a grapple attack as an opportunity attack. In the Lake Events table on p. 30, it lists the following result for a roll of 15 on the d20:

A knucklehead trout (…) leaps out of the lake, makes a tail attack against one random character in the boat, and dives back into the frigid water. A character with a passive Wisdom (Perception) score of 13 or higher is not surprised by the fish and can use its reaction to make an opportunity attack against it or try to grapple the fish as it dives back into the water.

To me, this implies that the reaction is used to make an opportunity attack, but that attack can be substituted with the grapple special attack – which goes against the rules as written, which state that a grapple can only be done with the Attack action, not as an opportunity attack.

Now, if the character is before the fish on initiative, it could use the Ready action to ready an attack, then use that attack to grapple. But the text doesn’t mention Ready, nor does it state that the fish has lost initiative to the grappling character, which would be required to Ready a grapple. If the fish is earlier on initiative, the character could react with an opportunity attack but could not have an action (to grapple) already Readied.

Does this imply that you can grapple with an opportunity attack, or is it just a case of specific beats general, applying only to this specific fish-slap encounter?

Or is it just alluding to the Ready action, in a roundabout way? (If it is the Ready action, it requires the character was not surprised, rolled higher initiative, and correctly deduced that the fish was going to use a split move to approach, attack, and then retreat.)

Note: This situation does not follow the rules provided earlier for fishing for knucklehead.

dnd 5e – Does Icewind Dale allow a grapple as an opportunity attack?

There is an event in Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden, and official Wizards of the Coast Dungeons & Dragons 5e product, which seems to allow for a grapple attack as an opportunity attack.

“A knucklehead trout leaps out of the lake, makes a tail attack against one random character in the boat, and dives back into the frigid water. A character with a passive Wisdom (Perception) score of 13 or higher is not surprised by the fish and can use its reaction to make an opportunity attack against it or try to grapple the fish as it dives back into the water.”

To me this implies that the reaction is used to make an opportunity attack, but that attack can be substituted with the grapple special attack, which goes against RAW which state that a grapple can only be done with the Attack action, not as an opportunity attack.

Now, if the character is before the fish on initiative, it could use the Ready action to ready an attack, then use that attack to grapple. But the text doesn’t mention Ready, nor does it state that the fish has lost initiative to the grappling character, which would be required to Ready a grapple. If the fish is earlier on initiative, the character could react with an opportunity attack but could not have an action (to grapple) already Readied.

Does this imply that you can grapple with an opportunity attack, or is it just a case of specific beats general, applying only to this specific fish-slap encounter?

Or is it just alluding to the Ready action, in a roundabout way? (If it is the Ready action, it requires the character was not surprised, rolled higher initiative, AND correctly deduced that the fish was going to use a split move to approach, attack, and then retreat).

EDIT: this situation does not follow the rules provided earlier for fishing for knucklehead.