dnd 5e – Does the Simic Hybrid’s Manta Glide let them glide after a high jump to double their movement and avoid opportunity attacks?

Rules as written: Yeah, this seems to be the case.

The rules for High Jumps state:

When you make a high jump, you leap into the air a number of feet equal to 3 + your Strength modifier (minimum of 0 feet) if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing high jump, you can jump only half that distance.

When calculating your standing jump height, you have to factor in the “Round Down” rule from the introduction to the Player’s Handbook:

Whenever you divide a number in the game, round down if you end up with a fraction, even if the fraction is one-half or greater.

So with a strength of 14, you have a modifier of +2, your standing jump height is 2 feet, so a 2 foot fall from the apex of your jump translates to 4 feet of lateral movement. This works just fine if you are measuring distance to the foot, but it is unclear how this functions if you are playing on a fixed 5-foot grid. In this case, you will have to ask your DM.

Rules as intended: This makes for a significantly overpowered feature, and the narrative image is ridiculous.

This, to me, seems to be a bug in the feature. If we take the feature to mean “double all your movement for free”, then it is absolutely broken. It goes from being a good feature in a specific context, to being a blanket improvement in any context where movement is measured.

Further, it is even more powerful than if a feature just said “Your speed is doubled”. A racial feature that said “your speed is doubled” would already be extremely powerful, but this feature is essentially that, with the fall protection.

Further, as written, it does prevent opportunity attacks: the part of the move where you leave the creature’s reach isn’t actually using your movement, which is sort of a cherry on top of an already broken feature. This simply cannot be the proper application of the feature, because that would make it far and away the most powerful feature in the game. Compare it to the Mobile feat:

  • Your speed increases by 10 feet.
  • When you use the Dash action, difficult terrain doesn’t cost you extra movement on that turn.
  • When you make a melee attack against a creature, you don’t provoke opportunity attacks from that creature for the rest of the turn, whether you hit or not.

Mobile is generally regarded as a very good feat. Allowing Manta Glide to work as you have described makes it a vastly superior version of the Mobile feat.

Mobile increases your speed by 10 feet, Manta Glide doubles it. Mobile lets you cancel difficult terrain if you take the Dash action, Manta Glide lets you do it for free. Mobile lets you prevent opportunity attacks from a creature you attack, Manta Glide lets you prevent opportunity attacks from any creature for free.

There is no way this is the correct interpretation. Manta Glide should simply not be allowed to function this way.

Also, the mental image of a character jumping a bit then gliding a few feet as their primary locomotion pattern seems quite silly to me, but that’s mostly an opinion of mine. Maybe you think that’s cool. That’s okay. The primary issue here is that this reading of the feature is so overwhelmingly powerful that it cannot be correct.

pathfinder 1e – Does using scent to “note the direction” provoke an attack of opportunity?

Does a creature with the scent ability who uses their move action to note the direction of a scent provoke an Attack of Opportunity?

The Scent special ability allows that:

When a creature detects a scent, the exact location of the source is not revealed—only its presence somewhere within range. The creature can take a move action to note the direction of the scent. When the creature is within 5 feet of the source, it pinpoints the source’s location.

Scent’s description doesn’t say one way or the other, and I can’t find a general rule like “move actions generally do (not) provoke unless they say otherwise”. The description of AoOs says:

Some actions, when performed in a threatened square, provoke attacks of opportunity as you divert your attention from the battle. Table: Actions in Combat notes many of the actions that provoke attacks of opportunity.

The table is silent on scent. My next thought was to check Perception’s active use, but it’s mum on AoOs, too (simply “Intentionally searching for stimulus is a move action.”).

dnd 5e – Does moving by means of a bonus action provoke opportunity attacks?

The rules unfortunately use natural language and seemingly contradict themselves. Ask the GM

First some rules quotes on bonus actions and reactions:

Various class features, spells, and other abilities let you take an additional action on your turn called a bonus action.

Certain special abilities, spells, and situations allow you to take a special action called a reaction.

So I would certainly assume this means bonus actions and reactions are both actions. Meanwhile, countless features throughout the game use phrases such as “as an action” or “using your action” or similar and these refer to your actual, big action.

Except when they don’t, such as One With Shadows and the SAC:

When you are in an area of dim light or darkness, you can use your action to become invisible until you move or take an action or a reaction.

Q. Does using a bonus action break invisibility from a warlock’s One with Shadows invocation?

A. Taking a bonus action breaks the invisibility of a warlock’s One with Shadows. A bonus action is an action.

Why would One With Shadows actually mention reactions at all but not mention bonus actions? It must be that bonus actions are actions and reactions are not. According to Crawford, this is the case:

Actions and reactions are different. If an effect, like the haste spell, shuts off one, it doesn’t necessarily shut off the other. 

But then why are bonus actions considered actions? The rules text that supports this seems extremely similar to the text about reactions. Furthermore, why is there this rule, if bonus actions are actions:

anything that deprives you of your ability to take actions also prevents you from taking a bonus action


Putting it all together, the opportunity attack rules state:

You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport, or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

So what happens if you move using your bonus action? The written rules are really a lot of a mess. At times they assume bonus actions are actions (One With Shadows), at times they assume they are not (“as an action” and the rule on the inability to use bonus actions when you cannot use actions), and at times they assume reactions are not actions (listing both out in various features). Meanwhile, the text that supports that bonus actions are actually actions is almost identical to the description of reactions, so why would we interpret these phrases to have completely different meanings?

I don’t see any real way to reconcile all of these rules in a coherent manner. They unfortunately used natural language, which didn’t help here, and picking through them for a RAW gets mixed results. I say, ask the GM.


At my own tables, using your bonus action to move provokes opportunity attacks, whether this is a houserule or not, I could not say.

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dnd 5e – If a Swashbuckler rogue’s melee attack misses a creature, does the Fancy Footwork feature still prevent opportunity attacks by the creature?

The targeted enemy can’t make opportunity attacks

As you’ve quoted, the relevant part of the Swashbuckler rogue’s Fancy Footwork feature description says (SCAG, p. 135; XGtE, p. 47):

During your turn, if you make a melee attack against a creature, that
creature can’t make opportunity attacks against you for the rest of
your turn.

The only requirement for the feature is that you “make a melee attack” against a creature on your turn; it doesn’t specify that the attack has to hit (or miss), so it doesn’t. Therefore, if you make a melee attack against a creature on your turn, then that creature can’t make opportunity attacks against you for the rest of that turn. That’s all there is to it.

Rules designer Jeremy Crawford reiterated this fact in an unofficial tweet from May 2016:

does the Fancy Footwork feature of the Swashbuckler rogue require the melee attack to be successful?

Fancy Footwork works whether or not your attack hits.

This tweet just repeats what’s already self-evident from the feature description: you just have to make the attack – you don’t have to hit.


As a sidenote, Fancy Footwork doesn’t even require an attack roll, since it doesn’t mention hitting or missing; it just says you need to make a melee attack against a creature. This means that even trying to grapple or shove a creature is enough to qualify for the benefit of Fancy Footwork, since both shoves and grapples are described as “special melee attacks”.

This fact is also reinforced in a Q&A about the interaction of the third benefit of the Mobile feat, which works similarly (as you note): Does a Grapple or Shove count as an attack for the third benefit of the Mobile feat?

dnd 5e – Does teleporting into the reach of a character with the Polearm Master feat provoke an opportunity attack?

Yes, an opportunity attack is triggered.

The rules for how teleportation works with opportunity attacks without polearm master are as follows:

You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

(PHB p.195) (emphasis added).

So in normal circumstances it would be impossible for a teleport to trigger an opportunity attack. However, the polearm master feat states:

While wielding a glaive, halberd, pike, or quarterstaff, other creatures provoke an opportunity attack from you when they enter your reach.

(PHB p.168) (emphasis added).

Since teleporting into someone’s reach involves entering their reach we can assume that the prerequisites for an opportunity attack via the polearm master feat are met.

This interpretation of the rules relies on the belief that specific beats general and that the rules for a feat are more specific than the general rules regarding teleportation/opportunity attacks.

dnd 5e – Does teleporting into the reach of a character with the Polearm Master feat provoke an opportunity attack?

Yes, an opportunity attack is triggered.

The rules for how teleportation works with opportunity attacks without polearm master are as follows:

You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

(PHB p.195) (emphasis added).

So in normal circumstances it would be impossible for a teleport to trigger an opportunity attack. However, the polearm master feat states:

While wielding a glaive, halberd, pike, or quarterstaff, other creatures provoke an opportunity attack from you when they enter your reach.

(PHB p.168) (emphasis added).

Since teleporting into someone’s reach involves entering their reach we can assume that the prerequisites for an opportunity attack via the polearm master feat are met.

This interpretation of the rules relies on the belief that specific beats general and that the rules for a feat are more specific than the general rules regarding teleportation/opportunity attacks.

dnd 5e – Polearm Master opportunity attack

RAW

“…creatures provoke an opportunity attack from you when they enter
the reach
you have with that weapon.”

With a 10′ reach, and the creature “appears” (more on that in a second) within that reach, say 5′, then they have appeared within the reach, they have not “entered the reach”, which would be at 10′.

You cannot provoke an opportunity attack normally when moving within the reach (e.g. moving around the person) only when a creature “moves out of your reach”. For a polearm, that is extended to 10′. Therefore, the “entering” reach would be the same; 10′ not 5′ since reach weapons:

“adds 5 feet to your reach when you attack with it. This property also
determines your reach for opportunity attacks with a reach weapon.”

If the creature is “in a wall” (whatever that means), and moving towards the polearm master, then no opportunity attack is provoked because the polearm master cannot see the target.

“You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you
can see

Or if the polearm master is moving towards the hidden creature, then opportunity attacks do not apply anyway.

So, suddenly appearing 5′ from a polearm master (i.e. within the reach range) having been unseen when entering the reach range or approached by the polearm master does not appear to provoke an opportunity attack.

This would appear to apply if the creature is popping out of a hole, opening a door/panel, or some magical effects like “Meld into Stone”. If you appear right next to the polearm master (5′), opportunity attacks would not be provoked.

dnd 5e – Does teleporting into a Polearm Master’s reach provoke attack of opportunity?

Yes, an opportunity attack is triggered.

The rules for how teleportation works with opportunity attacks without polearm master are as follows:

You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

(PHB p.195) (emphasis added).

So in normal circumstances it would be impossible for a teleport to trigger an opportunity attack. However, the polearm master feat states:

While wielding a glaive, halberd, pike, or quarterstaff, other creatures provoke an opportunity attack from you when they enter your reach.

(PHB p.168) (emphasis added).

Since teleporting into someone’s reach involves entering their reach we can assume that the prerequisites for an opportunity attack via the polearm master feat are met.

This interpretation of the rules relies on the belief that specific beats general and that the rules for a feat are more specific than the general rules regarding teleportation/opportunity attacks.

dnd 5e – Does teleporting into a Polearm Master’s reach provoke attack of opportunity?

Yes, an opportunity attack is triggered.

The rules for how teleportation works with opportunity attacks without polearm master are as follows:

You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction.

(PHB p.195) (emphasis added).

So in normal circumstances it would be impossible for a teleport to trigger an opportunity attack. However, the polearm master feat states:

While wielding a glaive, halberd, pike, or quarterstaff, other creatures provoke an opportunity attack from you when they enter your reach.

(PHB p.168) (emphasis added).

Since teleporting into someone’s reach involves entering their reach we can assume that the prerequisites for an opportunity attack via the polearm master feat are met.

This interpretation of the rules relies on the belief that specific beats general and that the rules for a feat are more specific than the general rules regarding teleportation/opportunity attacks.