interop – How to work with javascript promises in clojurescript?

I have a problem with js promises:
I am trying to convert this js code:

stripe.createToken(card).then(function(result) {
    if (result.error) {
      // Inform the customer that there was an error.
      var errorElement = document.getElementById('card-errors');
      errorElement.textContent = result.error.message;
    } else {
      // Send the token to your server.
      stripeTokenHandler(result.token);
    }

And I have the following:

(go
     (let (result (

But I get "No ReadPort.take protocol method! Defined for object type: (object promise)"

How can I do the js .then () part in cljs?

javascript – Error Express + Firebase SDK with promises

I am trying to create an application with server authentication using Passport. For that, it seemed good to us to set up a register to test. The problem I have is that when I send the data via Postman to register a user, it returns Ya existe un usuario con ese correo electrónico when this is not the case.

Here is my code:

import { Router } from 'express';
import database from '../config/database';
import * as bcrypt from 'bcrypt';
import passport from '../passport';

const router = Router();

router.post(
    '/registro',
    (req, res) => {
        const email = req.body.email.trim();
        const telefono = req.body.telefono.trim();
        const { nombre, password } = req.body;
        const errors = {};

        if (!email.length && !telefono.length) {
            return res.status(422).json({ error: 'Debe ingresar al menos un correo electrónico o número de teléfono' });
        }

        if(!password.trim().length) {
            errors.password = 'La contraseña es obligatorian';
        }

        if (email && !(/^w+((.-)?w+)*@w+((.-)?w+)*(.w{2,3})+/).test(email.toLowerCase())) {
            errors.email = 'El correo electrónico no es válidon';
        }

        if (telefono && !(/^(+)?(()?(0-9){3}())?(-s.)?(0-9){2}(-s.)?(0-9){4,6}$/im).test(telefono)) {
            errors.telefono = 'El número de teléfono no es válido';
        }

        if (Object.keys(errors).length) {
            return res.status(422).json(errors);
        }

        const ref = database.ref('usuarios');
        if (email.length) {
            ref.orderByChild('email').equalTo(email).once('value')
                .then(snapshot => {
                    if (snapshot.val() !== null) {
                        res.status(400).json({ error: 'Ya existe un usuario con ese correo electrónico' }); // acá termina
                    }
                });
        } else {
            ref.orderByChild('telefono').equalTo(telefono).once('value')
                .then(snapshot => {
                    if (snapshot.val() !== null) {
                        res.status(400).json({ error: 'Ya existe un usuario con ese número de teléfono' });
                    }
                });
        }

        const usuario = {
            ...req.body,
            tipo: 'usuario',
            fechaCreacion: Date.now(),
            fechaActualizacion: Date.now()
        };

        ref.push(usuario)
            .then(ref => {
                ref.once('value')
                    .then(snapshot => {
                        const usuario = snapshot.val();
                        usuario.key = snapshot.key;
                    });
            })
            .catch(error =>
                res.status(500).json({ error: error.message }));

    }
);

router.post(
    '/ingreso',
    (req, res, next) => {
        const { emailTelefono, password } = req.body;

        const usuario = emailTelefono.trim();

        if (!usuario.length || !password.length) {
            res.status(401).json({ error: 'Credenciales incorrectas' });
        }

        let tipo = null;

        if (/^w+((.-)?w+)*@w+((.-)?w+)*(.w{2,3})+/.test(usuario.toLowerCase())) {
            tipo = 'email';
        }

        if (/^(+)?(()?(0-9){3}())?(-s.)?(0-9){2}(-s.)?(0-9){4,6}$/im.test(usuario)) {
            tipo = 'telefono';
        }

        if (!tipo) {
            res.status(401).json({ error: 'Credenciales incorrectas' });
        }

        req.body.tipo = tipo;

        next();
    },
    passport.authenticate('local'),
    (req, res) => {
        const { 
            emailTelefono,
            password,
            rememberMe,
            tipo = 'email'
        } = req.body;

        const usuario = emailTelefono.trim();

        const ref = database.ref('usuarios');

        ref.orderByChild(tipo).equalTo(usuario).once('value')
            .then(snapshot => {
                const resultados = snapshot.val();
                console.log(resultados);
                const (key) = Object.keys(resultados);
                const usuario = resultados(key);

                bcrypt.compare(password, usuario.password)
                    .then(result => {
                        if (!result) {
                            res.status(401).json({ error: 'Credenciales incorrectas' });
                        }

                        const infoUsuario = {
                            key,
                            nombre: usuario.nombre,
                            usuario: usuario.email,
                            telefono: usuario.telefono,
                            tipo: usuario.tipo
                        };

                        res.json(infoUsuario);
                    })
                    .catch(error => {
                        res.status(500).json({ type: 'password', error: error.message });
                    })
            })
            .catch(error => {
                res.status(500).json({ type: 'database', error: error.message });
            })

    }
);

export default router;

I tried to add return every res.status().json() but I understand that its scope is in the promise and not in the function (add return to the promise ref.orderByChild('email').equalTo(email).once('value') didn't work either).

I have been thinking about making the code asynchronous so that there is no promising scope but I am not sure it will work.
Reading the documentation implies that the return that I put before should work …

Any idea what's going on? Thank you

Implement N Work Queue Using Promises in JavaScript

Write a code that will process a list of strings. The treatment will be a promise and it will be resolved in 1 to 10 seconds for example. Workers should not take more than limiting the strings and once one of the workers is free, he should take another chain until the list is complete. And detect the ready-made condition.

const limit = 2 // limit of promises started at the same time
let inProgress = 0 // number of in progress workers
let queue = () // list of strings that should be processed

Fill in random strings.

for (let i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
    queue.push(randomString(10))
}

console.log('queue', queue)

A function which will return a promise which will be resolved in a random time.

const func = text => {
    return new Promise((res) => {
        var randTime = Math.floor(Math.random() * 9000) + 1000
        console.log('working on', text)
        setTimeout(res, randTime, text)
  })
}

And the processing function.

function process() {
  if(inProgress == limit) {
    return false
  }

  if (queue.length === 0) {
    if (inProgress === 0) {
        console.log('all done')
    }
    return false  
  }

  let item = queue.pop()
  inProgress += 1

  func(item).then(result => {
    console.log('result', result);
    inProgress -= 1
    process()
  });

  process()
}

process()

node.js – Streaming Promises in NodeJS

Imagine a typical HTTP service that performs async database queries. If HTTP requests are received faster than the database can complete the queries (for example, because the disk or database network is slow), the promises accumulate in the loop of the database. 39 events and likely cause a memory pressure, trigger an exchange, a hang, etc. The HTTP service stops generating requests if the server can not consume them fast enough.

As a possible solution, I thought that an "asyncLimit" property of the database context (or something else) might indicate that IncomingMessage.reader.pause () should be called. Anyway, the database query would still be submitted because you can not just drop it at this point. But after a while, the pause () ing streams must limit the requests. After a long enough period, Kernerl's buffers will fill up, customers' buffers will fill up and customers will stop sending data. Then something can call or not call resume () depending on the state of affairs (DOS?).

So, how would you handle this scenario?

Of course, all asynchronous calls can accumulate in the event loop and cause problems. It would therefore be useful if the solution is generic to the async / wait idiom, which is probably very different. If async / wait is considered a stream of streaming Promises, the flow control of readable.pipe () could be a source of inspiration.

javascript – Promises and calls to your service from Svelte's website

What is the best way to write the following javascript code to the promised help?

Method 1:

Dashboard.svelte





{#was promise}
    

...expect

{: then number}

The number is {number}

{: catch error}

{Error message}

{/expect}

Proxy.js

function fetchRandomNumber() {
    return fetch(`tutorial/random-number`);
}

Method 2:

Dashboard.svelte





{#was promise}
    

...expect

{: then number}

The number is {number}

{: catch error}

{Error message}

{/expect}

Proxy.js

function fetchRandomNumber(callback) {
    fetch(`tutorial/random-number`)
      .then(function(response) {
        return response.text();
      })
      .then(function(json) {
        return callback(null, json);
      })
      .catch(function(ex) {
        return callback(ex);
      });
}

Both methods work well but I do not know what is the best practice to use. Or if there is another way, thank you for recommending it. Some questions here:

  1. Should we use callback with promise or not?
  2. I wanted Proxy.js to be as general as possible so that I could use it for different pages. With that, method 1 seems ineffective because I have to handle exception and json each time. Is there a way to do that?
  3. The transformResponse () method can have different implementations on different pages. That's why I can not move the code in Dashboard.svelte to Proxy.js.
  4. Method 2 somehow manages the exception messages and things to places. Dashboard.svelte and Proxy.js. So, is it inefficient?

Javascript Promises and Web Workers (multithreading)

I have about 9,000 images in a web page that need to be loaded when the page loads. They are currently being salvaged with the help of Promise and Resolution.

There is code that runs when all promises are resolved.

Is the loading of images done on the main wire? If I encapsulate the promise in a web tool, will it be faster? Also, if it's faster, do you have resources on how to proceed?

Thanks in advance!

An application on the Play Store promises to cut without root access, but I doubt that it works even

My phone is new, so I can not locate it because I do not want to cancel my warranty for the moment. Cutting my phone would not make a significant difference either. Since most other apps on the Play Store promise to run Trim only with root access, I do not think this app can do it without root, but if it's possible, it will not work. is the best thing I can get. Can any one please excuse my stupidity and confirm if this app actually works? It will be really useful.

Link to the application:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lagfix.fstrimmer

[ Politics ] Open question: What did Trump accomplish as prize? What promises did he keep?

[ Politics ] Open question: What did Trump accomplish as prize? What promises did he keep? .

ecmascript 6 – Using the finally method in JavaScript promises

In general, it's a simple example of Promise in JavaScript

let app = new Promise ((solve, reject) => {
leave number = 2
result = (number% 2 === 0)? right wrong
solve (result)
reject (0)
})

Who through the variable app we access what you are processing and you can return to us

app.then (res => {
console.log (res)
}). catch ((e) => {
console.log (e)
})

Where we identify what follows

  • so returns the result when the promise is resolved correctly
  • to catch deal with the possible mistake that faces the promise and for which he is not able to return a positive result

However, by finally searching, I find that you can chain another method called finally who according to the same source serves for and I quote:

Return a promise When resolved, be successful or rejected

Then I generate this example

let app = new Promise ((solve, reject) => {
leave number = 2
result = (number% 21 === 0)? true: fadlse
solve (result)
reject (0)
})

app.then (res => {
console.log (res)
}). catch ((e) => {
console.log (e)
}). finally (() => {
console.log ("processed successfully or failed")
})

Who of course having fadlse will give me this error

[object Error] {…}

But the method finally it is treated according to the above definition and it is returned to me

"Treated successfully or failed"

I say that I do not seek an opinion, but since finally returns something independent that the promise whether it is resolved or not, what is the practical use of this method?

Why can not Trump keep his promises?

He is currently building the wall … The construction actually began last year.

It has increased tax revenues, but spending has gone up. If you look back, Trump is complaining that congressional spending was too much, but to avoid a total shutdown in 2017, he still signed the budget ….

Bring back jobs? Have not you heard about the manufacturing jobs that have come back … those who, according to Obama, have gone forever?

And the economy …… HA! …. The economy is healthier than it has been for decades

You really seem not to have paid attention to reality.

.