Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a stopover in the UK?

Why yes.

This UK government website will tell you if you need a visa to transit through the UK. You enter your nationality, your destination and all the visas you already hold, and it will tell you if you need a transit visa or not. It also includes instructions for requesting it.

In summary (but check the exceptions):

  • You must arrive and depart by plane, and your outward flight must be booked and confirmed.
  • You don't need a transit visa if you don't need a visa for sightseeing in the UK.
  • A transit visa comes in two forms: the direct airside transit visa (DATV) which is limited to 24 hours and you must remain "airside" (ie cannot go through the & Immigration) and a visitor visa in transit, valid for 48 hours and allowing you to change airports (and terminals at airports where you cannot do this on the airside).
  • You must have all the necessary documents for your final destination, including visas.
  • You are exempt from needing a transit visa under certain conditions. These can be found at https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa. As of September 26, 2018, the conditions are as follows:

Exemptions

You do not need a visa if you have any of the following:

  • a visa for Canada, New Zealand, Australia or the United States (this can be used to travel to any country)
  • a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • a common format residence permit issued by a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • a residence permit issued by Canada after June 28, 2002
  • a uniform format category D visa for entry into a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • an Irish biometric visa (marked "BC" or "BC BIVS" in the "Notes" section)
  • a Scheme Schengen Approved Destination Scheme (ADS) group tourism visa when the holder travels to the Schengen country which issued the visa
  • a plane ticket from Schengen area, if you can prove that you entered Schengen area in the past 30 days on the basis of a valid Schengen ADS visa
  • a valid U.S. Temporary Immigrant Visa I-551 issued by the United States (a wet ink pad version will not be accepted)
  • a valid permanent U.S. resident card issued by the U.S. on or after April 21, 1998
  • an expired USA I-551 permanent resident card issued by the United States on or after April 21, 1998, with a valid letter I-797 authorizing the extension
  • a valid autonomous American immigration form 155A / 155B issued by the United States (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

All visas and residence permits must be valid.


You may be eligible for "visa-free transit" if:

Transit without a visa

You may be eligible for "visa-free transit" if:

  • you arrive and depart by plane (and)
  • have a confirmed connecting flight that leaves on the day of your arrival or before midnight the day after your arrival (and)
  • have the correct documents for your destination (for example a visa for this country)

One of the following should also apply:

  • you are traveling to (or on a part of a reasonable trip to) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and have a valid visa for that country
  • you are traveling from (or on a part of a reasonable trip from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and have a valid visa for that country
  • you are traveling from (or on a part of a reasonable trip from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and it has been less than 6 months since your last entry in this countries with a valid entry visa
  • you have a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • you have a common format residence permit issued by a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • you have a residence permit issued by Canada issued after June 28, 2002
  • you have a uniform format category D visa to enter an EEA country or Switzerland
  • you have an Irish biometric visa (marked "BC" or "BC BIVS" in the "Remarks" section) and an air ticket to the Republic of Ireland
  • you are from the Republic of Ireland and it has been less than 3 months since your last authorization, on the basis of a valid Irish biometric visa, to land or be in Ireland
  • you have a valid U.S. permanent resident card issued by the U.S. on or after April 21, 1998
  • you have a valid USA I-551 Temporary Immigrant Visa issued by the United States (a wet ink pad version will not be accepted)
  • you have an expired USA I-551 permanent resident card issued by the United States on or after April 21, 1998, with a valid letter I-797 authorizing the extension
  • you have a valid autonomous US immigration form 155A / 155B issued by the United States (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

You will not be able to transit without a visa if a border forces officer decides that you are not eligible for immigration rules. You can apply for a transit visa before traveling if you are unsure if you are eligible for visa-free transit.

Electronic visas or electronic residence permits are not acceptable for transit through immigration control without a visa.

All visas and residence permits must be valid.

Australian paper confirmation forms are not accepted.

If you need more information than that provided by this website, you will need to check with your airline or contact UKVI. Home Office Billing Procedures – A Guide for Carriers also provides advice on the most subtle points of the rules (it is aimed at professionals, not passengers, but explains in detail when a visa is or is not not necessary).

Airside transit

In London Heathrow, London Gatwick and Manchester, if you come from outside the United Kingdom or Ireland and you are going to another country (neither the United Kingdom nor Ireland) , it is possible to transit without entering the United Kingdom and via the UK Border Control, you can stay on the airside. . There is no airside hotel and the transit areas close at night, so if you have an overnight layover you have to go through UK Border Control. A detailed guide is available on the Heathrow Airport website.

Persons holding any valid UK visa type and above a transit visa do not need an additional visa. This means that the person can transit on a category "C" (visitor), category "D" (PBS), etc.

The policy is not available on the net. I wrote to the policy unit using my lawyer's hat and got this answer …

enter description of image here

They are thinking on the inclusion of this in the written guidelines. Maybe they will, maybe not.

How can checked baggage be handed over to the next airline, in transit / stopover / stopover?

Is there a way to book two connected flights (from different airlines; each on an independent website):

  • without going through a third-party agency (online or not)
  • still be able arrange baggage transfer from one flight to another
  • without having to leave the transit area, pass border control just to collect your luggage from airline A, then check it in again with airline B, and have to pass border control again?

From my little experience, I know that the luggage transfer is managed directly from the airport; but that it happens automatically just if the PNR (registration of passenger name) is the same for both reservations.

How can a humble private human being do this?

Can it be arranged by calling specific airlines? (usually only the first airline checks baggage) Or by calling the stopover airport? Or using a special system?

I think the main thing is to make one airline aware of the following (which of course is not automatic, when making a separate reservation on different sites).

From this answer, it seems that it should be possible, without going through a third party CRS (Computer Reservation System).


I think this information could be really useful to many, in these times of COVID-19 / Coronavirus, with very few options for people to repatriate, and often with agencies having no viable routes. .

airlines – Economic long-haul flights with stopover

I believe your premises are defective.

First, many short-haul aircraft, such as the A320 family, have versions that can fly on ocean routes and other long-haul routes:

  • BA flew (or used to not know if it was still operating before COVID) an A318 reserved for business class between London and JFK. Heading west, it had to refuel in Shannon (Ireland), due to headwinds and the limited MTOW taking off from LCY (but this allowed an American pre-clearance, available in Ireland but not in the United Kingdom). To the east is (was?) A direct flight.

  • The Company offers A321neo in business class only between Paris and New York (ORY-EWR).

The main problem is that these transatlantic routes are close to the maximum range of these planes, so there is a bit of a trade-off between the "payload" (read: passengers) and the fuel, hence class flights business only.

But you still have some fairly long A32x flights, such as Bahrain to London Heathrow (Gulf Air, A320), Moscow to Tenerife (S7, A320neo), Reykjavik to Boston (WOW, A321), Sydney to Manila (Philippine Airlines, A321neo). Many of these are in the 3000nm range and take 6 to 9 hours.

Some also use various 737 models for such routes (although this has been made easier with the 737 MAX now grounded).

Next, some LCCs have planes capable of flying longer distances. Examples include WOW (now extinct, used to operate A330s), Norwegian (operating 787s), Aer Lingus (formerly owner, but switched to an LCC model, operating A330s, with A350s on order), Air Asia X and its derivatives (operating A330s))and many more.

Add a "refueling stopover" in most cases only increases costs. Landing and take-off consume a lot of fuel and time. Landing fees must be paid. If you have to make a detour, it costs fuel and time. It adds more possible reasons for disruptions (due to weather or other events). Just a bad overall idea for a cost-conscious airline when there are better alternatives.

Some LICs simply do not want to enter these markets because they feel that the operating margins are not good enough. Many routes are simply impossible due to historical limitations. The "real" low cost model (very basic equipment on board) may be OK for a few hours, but becomes quite difficult to sell on 10 or 12 hour flights, so they have to "tweak" the model a bit.

But, as noted above, the LCCs to do operate long-haul.

Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a stopover in the UK?

Why yes.

This UK government website will tell you if you need a visa to transit through the UK. You enter your nationality, your destination and all the visas you already hold, and it will tell you if you need a transit visa or not. It also includes instructions on how to request it.

In summary (but check the exceptions):

  • You must arrive and depart by plane, and your outward flight must be booked and confirmed.
  • You do not need a transit visa if you do not need a visa for a sightseeing tour in the UK.
  • A transit visa comes in two forms: the direct airside transit visa (DATV) which is limited to 24 hours and you must remain "airside" (ie cannot go through the & Immigration) and a visitor visa in transit, valid for 48 hours and allowing you to change airports (and terminals at airports where you cannot do this on the airside).
  • You must have all the necessary documents for your final destination, including visas.
  • You are exempt from needing a transit visa under certain conditions. These can be found at https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa. As of September 26, 2018, the conditions are as follows:

Exemptions

You do not need a visa if you have any of the following:

  • a visa for Canada, New Zealand, Australia or the United States (this can be used to travel to any country)
  • a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • a common format residence permit issued by a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • a residence permit issued by Canada after June 28, 2002
  • a uniform format category D visa for entry into a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • an Irish biometric visa (marked "BC" or "BC BIVS" in the "Notes" section)
  • a Scheme Schengen Approved Destination Scheme (ADS) group tourism visa when the holder travels to the Schengen country which issued the visa
  • a plane ticket from Schengen area, if you can prove that you entered Schengen area in the past 30 days on the basis of a valid Schengen ADS visa
  • a valid U.S. Temporary Immigrant Visa I-551 issued by the United States (a wet ink pad version will not be accepted)
  • a valid permanent U.S. resident card issued by the U.S. on or after April 21, 1998
  • an expired USA I-551 permanent resident card issued by the United States on or after April 21, 1998, with a valid letter I-797 authorizing the extension
  • a valid autonomous American immigration form 155A / 155B issued by the United States (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

All visas and residence permits must be valid.


You may be eligible for "visa-free transit" if:

Transit without a visa

You may be eligible for "visa-free transit" if:

  • you arrive and depart by plane (and)
  • have a confirmed connecting flight that leaves on the day of your arrival or before midnight on the day of your arrival (and)
  • have the correct documents for your destination (for example a visa for this country)

One of the following should also apply:

  • you are traveling to (or on a part of a reasonable trip to) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and have a valid visa for that country
  • you are traveling from (or on a part of a reasonable trip from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and have a valid visa for that country
  • you are traveling from (or on a reasonable trip from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States and it has been less than 6 months since your last entry in this country with a visa of # 39; valid entry
  • you have a residence permit issued by Australia or New Zealand
  • you have a common format residence permit issued by a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • you have a residence permit issued by Canada issued after June 28, 2002
  • you have a uniform format category D visa to enter an EEA country or Switzerland
  • you have an Irish biometric visa (marked "BC" or "BC BIVS" in the "Notes" section) and an air ticket to the Republic of Ireland
  • you are from the Republic of Ireland and it has been less than 3 months since your last authorization, on the basis of a valid Irish biometric visa, to land or be in Ireland
  • you have a valid U.S. permanent resident card issued by the U.S. on or after April 21, 1998
  • you have a valid USA I-551 Temporary Immigrant Visa issued by the United States (a wet ink pad version will not be accepted)
  • you have an expired USA I-551 permanent resident card issued by the United States on or after April 21, 1998, with a valid letter I-797 authorizing the extension
  • you have a valid autonomous US immigration form 155A / 155B issued by the United States (attached to a sealed brown envelope)

You will not be able to transit without a visa if an officer of the border forces decides that you are not eligible under immigration rules. You can apply for a transit visa before traveling if you are unsure if you are eligible for visa-free transit.

Electronic visas or electronic residence permits are not acceptable for transit through immigration control without a visa.

All visas and residence permits must be valid.

Australian paper confirmation forms are not accepted.

If you need more information than that provided by this website, you will need to check with your airline or contact UKVI. Home Office Billing Procedures – A Guide for Carriers also provides advice on the most subtle points of the rules (it is aimed at professionals, not passengers, but explains in detail when a visa is or is not not necessary).

Airside transit

In London Heathrow, London Gatwick and Manchester, if you come from outside the United Kingdom or Ireland and you are going to another country (neither the United Kingdom nor Ireland) , it is possible to transit without entering the United Kingdom and via the UK Border Control, you can stay on the airside. . There is no airside hotel and the transit areas close at night, so if you have an overnight layover you have to go through UK Border Control. A detailed guide is available on the Heathrow Airport website.

Persons holding any valid UK visa type and above a transit visa do not need an additional visa. This means that the person can transit on a category "C" (visitor), category "D" (PBS), etc.

The policy is not available on the net. I wrote to the policy unit using my lawyer's hat and got this answer …

enter description of image here

They are thinking on the inclusion of this in the written guidelines. Maybe they will, maybe not.

Can I get a Schengen visa from a stopover country without a visa for the destination country?

You can apply for a Schengen visa with such an itinerary, but this increases the likelihood that it will be refused.

There are situations when a business traveler travels to a country, spends a few hours in a hotel near the airport and leaves. People with very expensive working hours who have to negotiate or sign a contract in person. If such a manager requests a visa for a single day, it could be granted – or more likely, the manager would already have a multiple entry visa during previous visits.

If a typical tourist does something like this, visa officers will likely think that the request it doesn't make any sense and deny it.


My advice: think about what you really want to do, long term.

You wrote in a previous question that you want to travel to Spain and that you to have a Romanian visa. Now you write that your Romanian visa has been refused and that you would rather go to Germany. (And possibly in Romania?) You have a file with the Romanian authorities. You may already have a file with the Schengen authorities, or you will have one once you have applied for a German visa. These files will be kept for a long time and it will be very difficult for you to come to Europe in the future if the authorities think you have lied to them.

If you want Trip In Europe, discover the tourist sites, then leave, start creating a travel history in your passports with successful visits to the countries of your region. Build your life where you live and document it. In a few years, apply for the tourist visa.

If you want immigrate in Europe and stay, look at the type of immigrants that Europe wants. Mainly highly qualified professionals, but also jobs like health professionals. Learn about the rules for all countries and choose the one that best fits your profile. It will not be easy, but coming this way is the safe route to citizenship.

usa – Flight to United Kingdom with stopover in the United States (March 2020)

I am an American citizen stuck in the Middle East. I have the option of returning to the United States on a repatriation flight, all other flights are canceled.

Will I be able to travel to the UK, where my spouse lives, or will I be quarantined on arrival (probably in New York)?

I know that unless someone is in my situation even these past few days, the answers will be speculative, but I would be happy to have any opinion.

My embassy is completely useless – they don't answer calls and don't send generic responses to emails.

reservations – Do I need a transit visa for a stopover in the Shengen area, I am a Cameroonian and permanent resident of Canada

Citizens of Cameroon generally do not need visas for airside transit to change planes in the Schengen area, as long as you do not need to go through them ;immigration.

However, if your airside transit is in France, Greece or Spain, these countries make require airside transit visas for Cameroonian citizens. If your transit is in one of these countries, your permanent residence in Canada should nevertheless exempt you from the visa requirement.

Air travel – Will a flight from Germany with a stopover in the United States to Jamaika be canceled?

Depending on the link to the Embassy that you have provided, entry to Jamaica will be denied. This will probably already be carried out by KLM staff in Frankfurt. This means that you will be denied boarding in the first place.

The only exception would be if you are (also) a Jamaican citizen.
You didn't mention when you fly, so if your flight will only be in a few weeks or even days, the situation may have completely changed. Then just wait and go day by day to see what the embassy has to say.

Based on your suggestion that you can still only travel to Atlanta, I suggest that you search for "skip a stage of a trip" here on this site. This usually turns out to be always bad (especially for a possible return flight which will be canceled by the airline). As in the United States, you should always check your baggage again during an international transfer, you can at least get your baggage and given the correct visa / visa for the United States, you can leave the airport and wait there for two weeks. Two weeks would be the minimum period that you would have to wait before being allowed to enter Jamaica. You would then have to buy a new ticket to Jamaica, of course, and your return flight would have been canceled and you would have to buy it too.

That said, it might be best to call the airline (Delta in this case, since you have booked with it) and see if it can reimburse you (in full).

International flight with stopover – recheck bags, customs?

I have a flight from Montreal to Newcastle UK, with a stopover in Amsterdam. I booked this flight via Delta – the first flight is operated by KLM, the second by KLM Cityhopper. Will I need to recheck my bag in Amsterdam, or will I have to go through customs in Amsterdam?

Likewise, my return flight from Newcastle to Montreal has a stopover in France – both flights operated by Air France (also booked with Delta). Do I have to re-register my bag or go through customs in France during this stopover?

If that adds / means anything, I'm an American citizen with an American passport.

trains – Do I have to go back to the same station after a Japan Rail stopover?

With a few exceptions, tickets at Japan Rail base fare allow stopovers. There is an excellent answer that explains when a ticket is eligible for layovers, but it is not clear from this answer or from the linked JR website if jump forward is allowed during a stopover.

Suppose I had to take the train from Nagasaki to Fukuoka and stop to visit the Yoshinogari Historical Park on my way. The park is located between two stations on the line that connects Nagasaki and Fukuoka, so my most efficient route would be to board the train in Nagasaki, to get off at Kanzaki (the closest station to Nagasaki), to visit the park , get on another train to Yoshinogarikoen (the closest station to Fukuoka) and continue to Hakata (or another station in the urban area of ​​Fukuoka).

Can I do this with a one-way ticket from Nagasaki to Hakata? Or do I have to go back to the same station where I left the front doors to resume my trip?