terminology – Please help me with this bitcoin sentence

enter image description here

The sentence (I need to add underneath the main paragraph) that I am unhappy with is:

If you are not awaiting any newly broadcasted deposits this message may not apply to you.

I am unhappy with my description (for the understanding of new/normal people)

Not many people would understand a ‘broadcast’ or the idea of being ‘new’

We understand what a ‘broadcast’ is but they don’t …

…and (I am trying to) relay that – new implies the tx has -1 confirmations (to enter the mem pool but not a block) but (as a normal person I would not get that)

This should be understood as ‘a transaction that you just sent’

But how to explain it in fewer words and simply, properly and professionally?

terminology – Are Product Designers UX Designers who also do Product Management? If not, what’s the diff between the 3?

I’m having to work with Product Managers for the 1st time and we seem to be in a push pull of who does what and who has the final say on this or that. Someone argued that it’s bc I’m a UX Designer rather than a Product Designer. Every time I read an article about the diff between UX and Product design I don’t quite get the difference…

However, if Product Designers take the responsibility of a Product Manager as well, then I understand the difference. Conducting user research, ideation workshops, designing as well as being responsible for the backlog (I don’t mean contributing, I mean responsible for making sure all the ACs are there etc), writing release notes… Having to attend all those meetings with different areas of the business I honestly don’t know how one would have the time to design and do all that. Only in this case I’d say yeah, I’m quite happy with the title of UX Designer!

Mind you: I work on a very complex B2B SaaS product, not a shoe shop… I think that might influence the answers…

terminology – What is a Problem Statement?

Typically Problem Statements are used to define and clarify the problem to be solved in the context of a UX design activity. There are a number of ways to structure or write this, but as long as the problem is written in a simple and clear statement then it is sufficient.

In contrast, a Hypothesis Statement is used to propose an explanation or a suggested solution to a particular question. It is used to help frame the way that the research is carried out, and typically in scientific research one would try to prove the hypothesis to be incorrect so as to avoid certain biases in the methodology and analysis. For example, if your hypothesis is that changing the button colour will improve usability, then you would typically set up some experiments to show that changing the button colour has no effect on usability. And if your data shows that it does have an effect then your hypothesis will have been proven to be valid.

You can define problem statements and hypothesis statements at different levels of detail, depending on the size of the project and the nature of the problems that you are trying to solve. So this can mean one general problem statement for the whole project, and different problems statements for major milestones or challenges to be solved.

Writing user stories is one of the techniques used in agile software development to help with requirements definition. From the Atlassian Playbook:

A user story is an informal, general explanation of a software feature
written from the perspective of the end user. Its purpose is to
articulate how a software feature will provide value to the customer.

Basically it is a good way to help frame the particular design problem from the perspective of the end-user, in terms of the goals that they want to achieve and without prompting what the solution should look like.

terminology – Scrolling Behavior – Mobile vs Desktop

We have some internal research that shows our users scroll much further down the page on mobile vs desktop. The page lengths are exactly the same in terms of the amount of products displayed – 3 across and 12 down.

When describing this behavioral difference I call it the ‘Facebook Phenomenon’ as in users just scroll endlessly without fully absorbing the information presented to them.

My question is, is there a UX/analytical term for this behavior? I made up the phrase ‘Facebook Phenomenon’ where I work but wondered if I’d subconsciously copied something I’d read.

terminology – Term “Eye load”?

I am missing a term to describe the mental load which is needed for a human to parse a large menu.

For example I want to switch to google forms:

eye-load--automcomplete-vs-searching-with-eyes

My eyes need to parse the symbols and/or text to find the right place to click.

I would call it “eye load” but I think this term does not exist.

If you compare this to an autocomplete solution, where a user can enter a text, then an autocomplete solution needs much less “eye load”.

Is there a common UX term for this?

terminology – Is there a common industry term to describe moving a task down in priority to an undefined “later” time?

A note for the moderators: this question is looking for INDUSTRY terminology (like SCRUM, Spike, Big O, Visitor Patter, etc) terminology, not opinions about how I should speak.

Let’s say that in our ticketing system a task will involve doing A, B, C, and D.

While doing the task, I find that doing C will require too large an investment for now and is not very high priority.

I have been saying something like “Let’s do A, B, and D, but I think we should punt on C for now”.

I looked up “punt on” and it seems to mean only to “not do”, not to put off until later. At least that’s what the results in Google told me.

Am I using “punt on” wrong? Is there a better term for this?

terminology – Is there an INDUSTRY STANDARD term to describe moving a task down in priority to an undefined “later” time?

A note for the moderators: this question is looking INDUSTRY STANDARD (like SCRUM, Big O, Visitor Patter, etc) terminology, not opinions about how I should speak.

Let’s say that in our ticketing system a task will involve doing A, B, C, and D.

While doing the task, I find that doing C will require too large an investment for now and is not very high priority.

I have been saying something like “Let’s do A, B, and D, but I think we should punt on C for now”.

I looked up “punt on” and it seems to mean only to “not do”, not to put off until later. At least that’s what the results in Google told me.

Am I using “punt on” wrong? Is there a better term for this?

terminology – Why a program written in computer language C is known as function

Thanks for contributing an answer to Computer Science Stack Exchange!

  • Please be sure to answer the question. Provide details and share your research!

But avoid

  • Asking for help, clarification, or responding to other answers.
  • Making statements based on opinion; back them up with references or personal experience.

Use MathJax to format equations. MathJax reference.

To learn more, see our tips on writing great answers.

terminology – What is the term for an image sequence with one fixed object in each image?

How is it called if I have movie or image sequence in which one central object is always fixed? For example, the same car in different landscapes, the same kitchen aid in different kitchens, etc.? This is typically used for product marketing movies and I would like to know how this is called. Youtube links, etc., would be appreciated!

terminology – What does ‘Impact on Distilled’ Mean?

I’m working a project around a checkout process and I’m using a prioritisation matrix to order which UX improvements to start on first based on a few conditions, these are:

  • Technical Feasibility
  • Design/UX Feasibility
  • Impact on User
  • Impact on Distilled

Can anyone explain what Impact on Distilled means in real terms? I can’t see to find anything that relates to this.