dnd 5e – Can I combine Haste, Green Flame Blade, Divine Smite, and Thunderous Smite like this?

Long Story Short: Not as such

Round 1: You cast haste. So far, so good, though I would then recommend using the extra action provided to make a weapon attack, boosted by Divine Smite if you wish.

Round 2a: Cast green-flame blade, using your Divine Smite for extra damage. So far, so good.

Round 2b: Extra attack from haste, Divine Smite for extra damage. Still working out fine.

Round 2c: Drop haste concentration to cast thunderous smite and attack. No can do. After dropping concentration on haste, the formerly hasted creature cannot move or take actions until after its next turn. While you can cast thunderous smite using a bonus action, you cannot make further attacks this turn, having consumed your extra hasted action, nor can you attack next round, due to the fallout from dropping haste. What this also means is that you cannot drop concentration in the middle and then cast/attack with thunderous smite, as the lack of actions start as soon as haste wears off.

Round 3: Can’t do anything of note due to the haste fallout, though you may maintain concentration on thunderous smite should you choose.

Round 4: You can finally make an attack to release that thunderous smite you’ve been holding onto.

Tl;dr: Just keep haste up and either multi-attack or green-flame blade and haste attack each turn, it’ll do more total damage. And it will also avoid wasting a 3rd level slot on what ends up being a 1-turn thing.

dnd 5e – Does a Javelin of Lightning allow a cleric to use Thunderous Strike?

To quote Naut Arch’s answer

It’s going to be up to the situation and up to the DM

There are no rules that specify who does what when it’s not a directly related cause and effect that can easily be traced back to a creature. Heck, it’s not even always cut and dry to trace back to a creature.

Because of that, the situations will matter and it will end up being a DM decision as to if the warlock is the source or something/someone else.


Personally, clearly the thrower of the Javelin is dealing damage

This specific case does not give any truly explicit indication of who/what is dealing the damage. That said, the weapon does state the following:

(…) Make a ranged weapon attack against the target. (…)

Where you, the attacker, the one using the Javelin, are making the attack. However, this is, technically, not 100% utterly and entirely explicitly stating that you are also the one dealing the damage. In fact, the same weapon later states (emphasis mine):

(…) the target takes damage from the javelin plus 4d6 lightning damage. (…)

I believe “from the Javelin” here is merely meant to convey that the target takes the regular damage as well as 4d6 lightning damage instead of just 4d6 damage, but this could still be construed as meaning the Javelin itself is dealing its normal damage and then also the 4d6 lightning damage.

The weapon’s description is not perfectly clear, but I would rule, in a heartbeat, that the one using the Javelin is dealing damage with said Javelin and thus they are the one dealing the damage. Perhaps the Javelin is also dealing the damage (after all, damage need not be caused by only one thing), but until a scenario arises where that call is required, I do not know how I would rule. I almost can’t imagine anybody even claiming the attacker isn’t the one dealing damage because it would be like arguing somebody swinging a sword isn’t dealing damage when they very much are.


What about the saving throw damage?

It is, of course, also ultimately up to the GM. That said, I would similarly, personally rule that this damage is also caused by the one attacking with the Javelin. They are the one who is dictating its path and choosing where the Javelin is sent, they have a great enough amount of agency in this scenario, they can, to me, meaningfully be said to be the causer or the damage, that I would conclude the damage can be considered to be being done by them as well.

dnd 5e – If I cast Thunderous Smite and Booming Blade, hit, and use Destructive Wrath to maximize damage, how many uses of Channel Divinity are expended?

How many uses of channel divinity should be expended in the following example?

Example:

  • A character is using that a weapon that deals 2d6 thunder damage on a hit.
  • They cast Thunderous Smite, using a bonus action.
  • Then cast Booming Blade (at 5th level), making a melee attack as an action.
  • On a hit, the weapon does a total of 2d6 + 1d8 + 2d6 thunder damage.

Thunderous Smite:

The first time you hit with a melee weapon attack during this spell’s duration, your weapon rings with thunder that is audible within 300 feet of you, and the attack deals an extra 2d6 thunder damage to the target.

Booming Blade:

At 5th level, the melee attack deals an extra 1d8 thunder damage to the target, and the damage the target takes for moving increases to 2d8.

Destructive Wrath:

When you roll lightning or thunder damage, you can use your Channel Divinity to deal maximum damage, instead of rolling.

I’m interpreting this as three separate rolls for thunder damage, each requiring a use of Channel Divinity to maximize. Instead of one use of Channel Divinity to maximize all of them at once.

One of the main reasons I’m thinking this, is because another use of Channel Divinity needs to be expended to maximize the secondary damage from Booming Blade, as it’s a completely separate roll.

dnd 5e – If I cast Thunderous Smite and Booming Blade, hit, and use Destructive Wrath to maximize damage, how many uses of Channel Divinity are expended?

How many uses of channel divinity should be expended in the following example?

Example:

  • A character is using that a weapon that deals 2d6 thunder damage on a hit.
  • They cast Thunderous Smite, using a bonus action.
  • Then cast Booming Blade (at 5th level), making a melee attack as an action.
  • On a hit, the weapon does an additional 1d8 + 2d6 + 2d6 thunder damage.

Thunderous Smite:

The first time you hit with a melee weapon attack during this spell’s duration, your weapon rings with thunder that is audible within 300 feet of you, and the attack deals an extra 2d6 thunder damage to the target.

Booming Blade:

At 5th level, the melee attack deals an extra 1d8 thunder damage to the target, and the damage the target takes for moving increases to 2d8.

Destructive Wrath:

When you roll lightning or thunder damage, you can use your Channel Divinity to deal maximum damage, instead of rolling.

I’m interpreting this as three separate rolls for thunder damage, each requiring a use of Channel Divinity to maximize. Instead of one use of Channel Divinity to maximize all of them at once.

One of the main reasons I’m thinking this, is because another use of Channel Divinity needs to be expended to maximize the secondary damage from Booming Blade, as it’s a completely separate roll.

dnd 5th – Is there a reason to focus on the Thunderous Punishment spell after using its effects?

You can focus on certain spells even after they will not bring you any benefit, for example the thunderclap spell states:

The first time you hit with a melee weapon attack for the duration of this spell, your weapon will ring with an audible thunder within 300 feet of you and the attack deals 2d6 additional Thunder damage to target. In addition, if the target is a creature, it must make a successful force save roll or be pushed about 10 feet from you and hit on the belly.

Nothing in the description of the spell would be beneficial to you if you decided to maintain your concentration after an attack.

Is there anything else besides the description of the spell where it might be useful? Maybe there is something that gives a bonus during the concentration or when it checks the concentration (saving throw Constitution), a saving throw in general?

Is there a reason to maintain concentration even after hitting a creature with thunderclap?


If this question is off topic because it is a list or is too broad, I will probably delete it because I do not see any other way to ask that question.