Would an American who lives in Japan be allowed into the Schengen Zone for non-essential travel?

TL;DR: you would probably be allowed in for Germany, but worth trying to confirm with German authorities. Below is for Germany but you can check other EU countries the same way.


reopen.europa.eu info for Germany:

As a third-country national coming from outside the EU and Norway,
Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, may I enter this country
without exceptional restrictions?

YES, WITH LIMITATION. Travellers from
Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia
and Uruguay will be able to enter without restrictions from 2 July.
That will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China — but only if
those countries also allow people from Germany to enter. For the
determination of the entry possibility, the previous location of the
travelers is decisive, not their nationality
. Regardless of the entry
options in Germany, a quarantine obligation based on the Infection
Protection Act applies in all federal states for incoming and
returning travelers from the risk areas specified by the RKI. With the
exception of passengers in transit traffic, this also applies in
principle to travelers with an important travel reason. An exception
to the quarantine applies to the current negative test. The most
important goal of all considerations remains to secure the further
containment of the pandemic.

Last update: 01-07-2020

See https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm whether Japan refuse travelers from Germany (depends to whom you’re married to, e.g. looks like Japan accepts travelers from Germany if spouse of nationals of Japan ).

https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm for Japan:

Published 01.07.2020

  1. Passengers who have transited through or have been in Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Rep., Chile, China (People’s Rep.), Chinese Taipei, Congo (Dem. Rep.), Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Rep., Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Eswatini, Finland, France, Gabon, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hong Kong (SAR China), Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Korea (Rep.), Kosovo (Rep.), Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macao (SAR China), Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova (Rep.), Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russian Fed., San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Uruguay, USA, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Vatican City (Holy See) or Viet Nam in the past 14 days are not allowed to enter until 31 July 2020.
    • This does not apply to nationals of Japan.
    • This does not apply to spouses or children of nationals of Japan if they can prove it.
    • This does not apply to residents of Japan with “Permanent Resident”, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National”, “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long Term Resident”, who have departed Japan with Re-entry Permission by 2 April 2020.
    • This does not apply to residents of Japan with “Permanent Resident”, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National”, “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long Term Resident”, who have departed Japan with Re-entry Permission between 3 April and 28 April 2020 and have only been in Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Cape Verde, Colombia, Djibouti, Dominican Rep., El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Maldives, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Qatar, Russian Fed., Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, St. Kitts and Nevis, Tajikistan, United Arab Emirates, Ukraine or Uruguay.
    • This does not apply to residents of Japan with “Permanent Resident”, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National”, “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long Term Resident”, who have departed Japan with Re-entry Permission between 29 April and 15 May 2020 and have only been in Afghanistan, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Cape Verde, Colombia, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Maldives, Pakistan, South Africa, Sao Tome and Principe, Tajikistan or Uruguay.
    • This does not apply to residents of Japan with “Permanent Resident”, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National”, “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long Term Resident”, who have departed Japan with Re-entry Permission between 16 May and 26 May 2020 and have only been in Afghanistan, Argentina, Bangladesh, El Salvador, Ghana, Guinea, India, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, South Africa or Tajikistan.
    • This does not apply to residents of Japan with “Permanent Resident”, “Spouse or Child of Japanese National”, “Spouse or Child of Permanent Resident” or “Long Term Resident”, who have departed Japan with Re-entry Permission between 27 May and 30 June 2020 and have only been in Algeria, Cameroon, Central African Rep., Costa Rica, Cuba, Eswatini, Georgia, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Iraq, Jamaica, Lebanon, Mauritania, Nicaragua, Senegal or St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
    • This does not apply to passengers with a Special Permanent Residence Permit. However, they must have a Re-entry Permit from a regional immigration officer.
    • This does not apply to US military personnel.
  2. A completed “Quarantine Questionnaire” must be presented upon arrival.
  3. Passengers and airline crew are subject to medical screening.
  4. Visa exemption for passengers with passengers with a British passport, Hong Kong (SAR China) passport, Macao (SAR China) passport is suspended.
  5. Visa exemption for nationals of Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czechia, Cyprus, Denmark, Dominican Rep., El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Italy, Korea (Rep.), Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay and Vatican City (Holy See) is suspended.
  6. Visa exemption for nationals of Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, Georgia, India, Kazakhstan, Lao People’s Dem. Rep., Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Qatar, Samoa, Solomon Isl., Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Viet Nam with a diplomatic, official or service passport is suspended.
  7. Visa exemption granted to passengers with an APEC Business Travel Card issued by Brunei Darussalam, China (People’s Rep.), Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russian Fed., Singapore, Thailand or Viet Nam, is suspended.
  8. Nationals of China (People’s Rep.) with a passport issued in Hubei Province or Zhejiang Province (China People’s Rep.) are not allowed to enter Japan.
    • This does not apply when passengers can prove that they have not been in Hubei Province and Zhejiang Province the last 14 days.
  9. Passengers who were in the cruise ship ‘Westerdam’ are not allowed to enter Japan.
    • This does not apply to nationals of Japan.
  10. Visas issued on or before 8 March 2020 by the Embassies, Consulates-General and Consulate of Japan in China (People’s Rep.), Hong Kong (SAR China), Korea (Rep.) or Macao (SAR China) are invalidated.
  11. Visas issued on or before 20 March 2020 by the Embassies, Consulates-General and Consulate of Japan in Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom or Vatican City (Holy See) are invalidated.
  12. Visas issued on or before 27 March 2020 by the Embassies, Consulates-General and Consulate of Japan in Bahrain, Brunei Darussalam, Congo (Dem. Rep.), Indonesia, Israel, Malaysia, Philippines, Qatar, Singapore, Thailand or Viet Nam are invalidated.
  13. Visas issued on or before 2 April 2020 by the Embassies, Consulates-General and Consulate of Japan in Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Rep., Chad, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cook Isl., Costa Rica, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominican Rep., El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini (Swaziland), Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Kuwait, Lao People’s Dem. Rep., Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Isl., Mauritania, Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States), Mongolia, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territory, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Russian Fed., Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles , Sierra Leone, Solomon Isl., Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Yemen, Zambia or Zimbabwe are invalidated.
  14. Passengers transiting through Tokyo (NRT) must transit on the same calendar day.

dnd 3.5e – Are there any non-epic methods of time travel (years/decades/centuries) in third edition?

Are there any non-epic methods of time travel (years/decades/centuries, not smaller than a year) in third edition?

I’m not looking at short duration tricks, nor am I looking for anything that is a one-way trip. Please exclude theoretical optimization tricks.

I am looking for a way to travel a large temporal distance, and back again, preferably affecting the destination in question. Forwards or backwards in time is fine.

ID proof to present in airport for domestic travel

I have a color printout of a scanned copy of either card will it accept in airport for domestic travel

How has COVID-19 impacted religious visas for travel to the U.S.? [closed]

How has COVID-19 travel restrictions impacted religious visas for foreign religious workers to work in the U.S.? Has it become more difficult to get religious visas in the U.S.? Or do travel restrictions not correlate with ease of obtaining a religious visa?

Travel from UK to France as a non-European UK resident during Covid-19 restrictions

The guidance is reasonably clear, in both French and English. If the restrictions was based on citizenship, the website would state so, as it does in several other places.

It does however mention additional restrictions for British residents.

However, due to reciprocity:

If you are coming from the United Kingdom, no restrictions are in place but you will be asked to carry out a 14-day voluntary quarantine.

You should still be expempted of that based on another provision detailed further down:

Certain categories of persons, particularly those in transit to another country, will be exempt from the voluntary 14-day quarantine mechanism, unless they show symptoms:

Individuals in transit to another country;

It’s a good idea to have a proof of your residence in the UK and of your ability to return there of course.

air travel – What do I need to know to make my connecting flight? First time with a layover

Assuming your flights were booked as a single itinerary, you will not need to go back through security nor pick up any checked luggage in Denver. When your first flight lands:

  1. Get off the plane, taking your carry-on luggage with you (note 1)

  2. Look for a monitor displaying departing flights

  3. Find your second flight and note its gate number

  4. Go to that gate and wait until it is time to board. (note 2)

You should be given boarding passes for both flights when you check in in PDX (or online). If something happens and you lose your second boarding pass, it can be reprinted at the departure gate of your DEN-BNA flight.

If your flights were not booked as a single itinerary, things get more complicated, but I won’t go into that unless you confirm it’s the case.

Note 1: If your PDX-DEN flight was on a smaller regional aircraft, some of your carry-on luggage may have been “valet checked” or “gate checked” at the departure gate in Portland. If so, you need to pick it up in the jetway as you exit the plane in Denver, and take it with you to your next flight.

Note 2: DEN has three gate areas, A, B and C; every gate number includes the area letter (e.g. A31, B17). Most likely your DEN-BNA flight will depart from the same gate area where the PDX-DEN flight arrived, in which case you only need to walk east or west along the concourse in the appropriate direction until you find the gate. If you should need to go to a different gate area, they are connected by an underground train, which can be reached by going to the center of the concourse and taking an escalator or elevator down.

eu – Travel for UK Residents to the Schengen Area

During the COVID crisis, all UK nationals are allowed to travel to the EU. I am a South African national with long term residence in the UK and would normally require a Schengen visa to travel to Europe. Although the European Commission says that 3rd country nationals who are resident in EU member states (and the UK) are exempt from the travel restrictions, they do not mention how we are meant to obtain a Schengen visa as applications are currently closed, or if we need one at all.

The rules seem to fail to account for EU residents who would ordinarily need a Schengen visa to travel Europe. To compound my confusion the EU has decided today to open its borders to several countries such as Rwanda, Algeria, and Morocco whose citizens require Schengen visas to enter.

Does anyone have any advice/official sources that can help clarify this issue?

customs and immigration – UK to continental Europe and back, same rules for air or surface travel?

Short version: Are there separate (COVIS 19) rules for travel between the UK and the Netherlands, and Belgium or France, based on the mode of transport, (flights or ferries and trains.)

Long version: My long distance relation boyfriend and I usually meet each other a few times each year, him traveling to continental Europe (the Netherlands, Belgium, France) or me from the Netherlands to the UK and the other coming to the same place.
We select our mode of travel based on convenience, cost and a bit of environmental concern.

In these COVID 19 days we wonder whether there is a difference how quarantaine (or self isolation) rules work between the different modes of transport.

As we are each citizen in our own country, visa rules do not matter to us, but for completeness sake, if there is a real difference that can be included.

At the time of writing, there seems to be a huge difference in cancelation rates, with flights being cancelled more often than they happen but as I expect changing the quarantaine rules to change that, I want to keep that out of this question. I may ask a different question if it seems relevant.

air travel – Can I use a Thomas Cook headset on a British Airways airplane?

There was a time when airline headsets had two prongs. These couldn’t be used with your computer, phone or other headset-accepting devices. These days, most airline headsets have a single prong.

If Thomas Cook provided you double-prong headsets, and the BA plane has single-prong jacks, then you won’t be able to use them without an adapter. (While you can buy these adapters, they cost more than the headphones BA will probably be willing to sell you very cheaply. The adapters are useful for people who fly a lot with expensive headphones they want to use on a variety of planes.) It could be the other way around, too: you have single-prong headphones you can’t use on a double-prong plane. There are adapters for these, too, but again I don’t think it’s worth your getting an adapter in advance: if your old TC headphones don’t work on the BA plane, pay the pound or two for BA headphones and relax knowing you now have all the kit you need for any plane you might fly on in future.

What I expect is most likely is that you have single-prong headphones and that’s what the plane takes. If you want to be completely sure about the plane, provide more details of your flight, so that people who care about and know these sorts of things can tell you what to expect on the plane. (To be completely sure about your existing headphones, look at them.)

As for the “may” part of this, if your headphone fits the jack, no airline cares whether you bought it from them on a previous flight, from another airline on a previous flight, or from an electronics store.

air travel – May I use a Thomas Cook headset on a British Airways airplane?

You will be allowed to use them, whether they work depends on the plug on the headset and the actual plane you use.
And on whether BA have an in-plane entertainment system.

When you know which route you will fly you can ask for one us to tell you whether it is likely that it will be usefull.