usability – Select and remove accordion option

Context:

I have a website where you have the ability to select a delivery option but also read more information on each one and potentially have some custom options for each option too. Depending on the options they can become rather lengthy. This is the solution I have come up with.

My solution:

I have some delivery options in an accordion that shows information text text (and potentially other selectable options, lists etc) in them.

To select a delivery option (only 1) I have a ‘select’ button placed next to the accordion arrow. I also need the option to remove it and show its selected which is starting to get cluttered and it doesn’t feel like a good experience. See below:

enter image description here

Question(s):

Does anyone know of any better patterns for this or know how this can be improved?

interaction design – Tradeoffs in buy-in/uptake, retention, usability and engagement when splitting an app in two (or more)

I’m designing an app that, due to its nature, has 3-4 absolutely distinct but interacting role-types. However, importantly, a single person can be tagged with any combination of these roles. One possibility is to have a single app where a user can select the role-type through which they are currently interacting, and another approach is to have separate apps for the roles that coordinate data appropriately.

I’d personally lean towards distinct but communicating apps, but there are scenarios that will force a user to switch roles, hence in the multi-app scenario, switch apps. I am curious if anyone has looked at the effects of switching apps on how usable the “ecosystem of apps” is. Does having to switch apps occasionally affect usability, engagement, retention, confusion, initial uptake, etc? If so, is it known how much the number of switches per day/week modulates the effect?

usability – Order of list boxes in a dual list box

A dual list box is a component-based on two list boxes placed together that allows adding, removing, and ordering items.

According to Kaley from the nngrounp: “The Listbox on the left holds available options and the Listbox on the right represents selected items. The Add button moves an item from the available list to the selected list and the Remove button moves a selected option back to the available list, to deselect it. Users can also move options up and down to reorder elements in the list

My concern is the following, due to the normal order of reading of a user, it seems more natural to place the selected list box on the left instead of the right. Because the page scanning is faster when you only want to review while defining is the opposite.

enter image description here

So, my question is:

Does it matter the order of the list boxes? or it’s just to be consistent using always the same order because users will learn the pattern reading the labels?

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usability – How to label resources belonging to users in a two-sided marketplace?

I read great advice on “Your” vs “My” in user interfaces and ‘My Account’ or ‘Your Account’?

But neither deals with the special case of two-sided marketplaces.

Example – airbnb clone

Suppose a user could be both a guest and a host. And suppose the app has separate pages for ‘bookings as a guest’ and ‘bookings as a host’. What should each of these two pages be called? (please assume they’re both linked to from the navbar at top of page).

The best I came up with was ‘Bookings’ for bookings as guest and ‘Bookings-with-you’ for bookings as a host. But I’m not sure if that’s best practice, not too wordy, and still usable.

Note: a misunderstanding could be costly here. Example: if a user checks ‘Bookings’, sees none, and wrongly concludes they have no upcoming bookings (as a host), i.e. the user could accidentally assume that ‘Bookings’ meant ‘Bookings as a host’. Then they could be unprepared for an upcoming booking! (bad outcome)

So there’s some subtlety in the naming that really matters. Any help or advice on this?

usability – eCommerce -> After a digital course has been purchased, should I still show this course in category page?

I am developing an online course website based on WordPress.

Website has 30 courses in total.

Courses are divided into 5 categories (A, B, C, D, E).

There are 6 courses per category.

Each course also has a fixed price.

So once a user purchase a course,
user can only purchase it once because it`s a digital course.

In addition, course status can be either “not started”, “in progress” or “done”.

Therefore, users can access their “membership area” and
see courses divided into the following 3 sections based on user activity:

  • “Not started” section shows all courses that user did not start yet.
  • “In progress” section shows all courses that are in progress.
  • “Done” section shows all courses that user already completed.

Here is my question:

Once user purchase a course,
should I continue showing this course in categories page OR
should I remove this course from categories page?

For example,
Category A has 6 courses.
User just purchased 5 courses in this category.
Should category A page show all 6 courses with 5 of them tagged as “purchased” OR
should category A page show only 1 course, the course which user did not purchase yet?

usability – eCommerce -> Should I continue to show a digital course already purchased in category page?

I am developing an online course website based on WordPress.

Website has 30 courses in total.

Courses are divided into 5 categories (A, B, C, D, E).

There are 6 courses per category.

Each course also has a fixed price.

So once a user purchase a course,
user can only purchase it once because it`s a digital course.

In addition, course status can be either “not started”, “in progress” or “done”.

Therefore, users can access their “membership area” and
see courses divided into the following 3 sections based on user activity:

  • “Not started” section shows all courses that user did not start yet.
  • “In progress” section shows all courses that are in progress.
  • “Done” section shows all courses that user already completed.

Here is my question:

Once user purchase a course,
should I continue showing this course in categories page OR
should I remove this course from categories page?

For example,
Category A has 6 courses.
User just purchased 5 courses in this category.
Should category A page show all 6 courses with 5 of them tagged as “purchased” OR
should category A page show only 1 course, the course which user did not purchase yet?

usability – Cross reference between tabs, a bad practice?

It depends on what your users need to view and/or see.

The article you reference hits on a key point on #3:

Use tabs only when users don’t need to see content from multiple tabs simultaneously. If people do need to compare the info behind different tabs, then having to switch back and forth puts an added burden on their short-term memory, increases cognitive load and interaction cost, and lowers usability compared to a design that puts everything on one big page.

If your users need to complete a process:

then moving between tabs can be difficult, because you’re asking the user to memorize information which is now out of their sight. The way around this is to put completed information inside the tab bar.
We see this with payment ‘step throughs’ on one page that act like an accordian (okay, not really tabs), where the status is put into the header (with icons like a checkmark to indicate complete).

If your users need to cross reference info for viewing only:

Tabs can work (but see quote above!). If there’s a logical coherence between the material being referenced, you might just want to group the content together (but I don’t know your use case).

Test with your users, and make sure that users don’t suffer understanding by not seeing simultaneous content.

Information can be sequenced in time or adjacent in space: Sequenced in time tradeoffs mean more memorization (if the content needs to be compared and analyzed.).

mockup

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups

Update: for eCommerce context as updated question.

You could use amazon’s example (and countless other sites) where the product page has the ‘related’ options.

The content can display either:

  • what users bought with this
  • what users also searched for
  • what the business owners are promoting (do we want to sell more movies than books? what’s our business goal?)

Amazon has a slider users can view horizontally. If you needed to, you could use some pills or tabs for filter by content type, or stack bands of content vertically (although that could get noisy!).

See this quick image:enter image description here

usability – What is the best alignment of the main container in a dashboard?

There is the ‘classic’ structure of typical business dashboards as you have described, and the patterns that are common for screen scanning can be applied. However, I think the scanning pattern is also influenced by how you structure and present the content on the screen, so it is a catch-22 in some ways depending on if you are creating a new design or modifying an existing one.

I think to provide a more complete answer you will need to fill some gaps, but in general my advice on dashboard design would be to consider some of the following points:

  • Blank, half-empty and full states: how will it look when the user sees it for the first time? What about when data is filling up, and also when the dashboard is completely full?
  • Purpose: for dashboards designed for decision-making (i.e. Business Intelligence) you need to avoid cluttering and highlight key information, so this could definitely affect your design and layout compared to a typical reporting or status tracking dashboard.
  • Widgets or visualization: depending on the number and type of ‘widgets’ used, there might be different alignment or layout strategies that are more appropriate than others.
  • Viewpoint: depending on the actual size of the screen and devices that you are designing for, knowing that on most desktop setups in the office have dual monitors and the scanning pattern would be compared to single monitors.

There are probably other factors too but I haven’t really experienced or look into it yet.

UPDATE (based on the screenshots provided)

You’d have to test this of course, but just thinking about the basic principles of good design (simple and clear) you would be creating additional lines of alignment and causing the user to move their gaze across the screen more with a centre aligned layout compared to a full screen one according to your design

enter image description here

Now I would necessarily say that citing the principles of design would be enough evidence to support your claims, but a quick test with some people and see how much quicker it is to locate and find contents on the page would probably do the trick.

usability – Why do websites of alcohol products ask for age by showing drop downs rather than simply asking if you are of legal drinking age?

In the US, alcohol advertising is regulated by state and federal guidelines, as well as industry standards for self-regulation. For example, the Distilled Spirits Council has a set of guidelines for responsible digital marketing. Here’s what they say about age verification:

Age affirmation is a process or a mechanism by which users provide their full
date of birth (month, day and year) and, when appropriate, country of residence
to affirm they are of legal purchase age. Age affirmation mechanisms may vary
depending upon available technology and examples could include, among other
things, an age affirmation page, an email or instant messaging age affirmation, or the use of a site’s “registered user” database of users of legal purchase age.

Why this standard and not an “easier” method? If I had to speculate, it would be so that all advertisers would have a clear, obvious method for verifying age that would both meet legal standards and prevent less-responsible advertisers from trying to game the system.

If the age verification process were not crystal clear, and an underage drinker injured himself or others after visiting an alcohol company’s website, that could open the advertiser up to legal liability. With a form that the user has to complete and submit, then the alcohol advertiser could argue that they have done their due diligence and met their legal and ethical responsibilities.