Virtual Machine – How to Design a Virtualization Infrastructure

I have a university mission that asks you to design the infrastructure for a company that wants to virtualize its servers.

It asks the number of hosts required, the number of virtual machines running on each of them, as well as the operation of each, cpu, ram, storage, and so on.

It provides you with a list of their current non-virtualized servers (at the end of the post).

I do not understand how I'm supposed to design the infrastructure without running a test to determine the amount of CPU / RAM / storage needed by each server. Would not that be a complete guess?


  • 2 x Active Directory domain controllers on Windows Server 2008 R2, (2 x Xeon 3.6 GHz, 8 GB RAM, 140 GB hard drive). These servers are used for authentication and authorization.
  • 3 x SQL Server 2003 database servers on Windows Server 2003 (2 x 2.8 GHz xeon, 4 GB RAM, 500 GB RAID array). These servers are used for database operations for Active Directory, Exchange, SharePoint, and their Client Design application.
  • 1 x Exchange 2007 mail server on Windows Server 2008 R2 (2x 3.6 GHz xeon, 8 GB RAM, 250 GB RAID-1 array);
  • 4 x Windows Server 2003 print and file servers (2 x 2.8 GHz Xeon, 4 GB RAM, 250 GB RAID-1 array);
  • 1 x SharePoint Server 2007 on Windows Server 2008 R2 (2x 3.6 GHz xeon, 16 GB RAM, 250 GB RAID-1 array);
  • 1 x Client Design and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) client application server on Windows Server 2008 R2 (2 x Xeon 3.6 GHz, 8 GB RAM, 250 GB RAID-1 array);
  • 2 x Red Hat Enterprise 5 Linux servers running Apache and TomCat (2 x Xeon 2.8 GHz, 16 GB RAM, 140 GB hard drive).